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civil power, in the late and

prefent reign, has been indebted to your counsels and wisdom.

But to enumerate the great advantages which the public has received from your

administration, would be a more proper work for an history than for an address of this nature.

Your Lordship appears as great in your private life, as in the most important offices which You have borne. I would therefore rather choose to speak of the pleasure You afford all who are admitted into your conversation, of your elegant taste in all the polite parts of learning, of your great humanity and complacency of manners, and of the

surprising influence which is peculiar to You in making every one who converses with your Lordship prefer You to himself, without thinking the less meanly of his own talents. But if I should take notice of all that might be observed in your Lordship, I should have nothing new to say upon any other character of distinction. I am,

MY LORD

YOUR LORDSHIP'S

MOST OBEDIENT,

MOST DEVOTED,

HUMBLE SERVANT,

THE SPECTATOR.

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The ,

I E Spectator's prefatory discourse, and account of

himself

Charaders of the members of the Spectator's Club

On public credit

3

Spectator's further account of himself and his design 4

On the Italian opera

On the abuse of the understanding

On the folly of superstition

7

On masquerades

8

On clubs, with the rules of the two-penny club 9

The Spectator recommends the perusal of his papers

Arietta's character; the story of Inkle and Yarico

Against telling stories of spirits and apparitions

On the Italian opera ; Nicolini's fine action

13

On the public diversions

* On female vanity

15

Dehgn of this work not to satirize particular per fons 16

An account of the Ugly Club

17

Farther account of the Italian opera

18

Ejay on envy

19
On impudence; the difference between English, Scorch,

and Irish impudence

On the professions of divinity, law and phyfic

Letters on the reigning taste of plays and operas

Wit, dangerous in an ill-natur'd or vicious man

23

On impertinence ; with letters from T. Kimbow, &c. 24

Letter from a valetudinarian

25

On the monuments in Westminster-abbey

On ambition, and the anxiety occa honed by it

27

On the absurdity of several signs in London

On the Italian recitativo and French opera

29

Letter from the amorous club at Oxford

30

Scheme for a Greek opera

31

Speculations on ugliness

32

On beauty ; the history of Lætitia and Daphne 33

The Spectator's resolution to go on in the cause of virtue 34

On humour

35

Letters from the playboufe, &c.

Character of Leonora, and catalogue of her library 37

T H E

SPECTATO R.

N° 1. Thursday, March 1, 1710-11.

Non fumum ex fulgore, fed ex fumo dare lucem
Cogitat, ut speciosa dehinc miracula promat.

Hor. Ars Poet. ver. 143.

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One with a flash begins, and ends in smoke;
The other out of smoke brings glorious light,
And (without raising expectation high)
Surprises us with dazzling miracles.

RoscoMMON.

I have

HAVE observed, that a reader seldom peruses a book with pleasure, till he knows whether the writer of it be a black or a fair man, of a mild or choleric disposition, married or a bachelor, with other particulars of the like nature, that conduce very much to the right understanding of an author. To gratify this curiosity, which is so natural to a reader, I design this paper and my next as prefatory discourtes to my following writings, and Thall give some account in them of the several persons that are engaged in this work. As the chief trouble of compiling, digesting,

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