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3. Furnishing Statistics and Information.--A County or District Superintendent could furnish all statistics and school information needed from his district by the State Superintendent; and thus these necessary statistics would not be, as they now very frequently are, so erroneous as to make it necessary to return them repeatedly for correction, and sometimes utterly fail of securing the corrections desired. Such County or District Superintendent could collect and embody in his annual report a full statement of facts relative to the condition, progress and wants of his district-a sad want for which no means of supplying is now provided. The State Superintendent constantly feels the need of some such officer, familiar with a special locality-a county, for instance—to whom to apply for much needed information. The reports of the County Superintendents of Pennsylvania, appended to the State Superintendent's Annual Report, are full of interest, information, and suggestions, alike to the State Superintendent, the Legislature, and readers in general. 14. Adjusting Controversies.-Whoever knows any thing of the difficulties under which the State Superintendent now frequently labors in appeal cases-perhaps some important fact improperly or obscurely stated, which if fully known,might pro duce a very different decision--whoever knows any thing of such difficulties, knows very well how much more understandingly such cases could be examined and decided on the spot, with all the facts brought fully to view-perhaps relating to a schoolhouse site, the propriety of which could only be determined by a personal inspection. This would be a very important part of the labors of a County or District Superintendent, and from his im partial decision, few appeals would ever be made to the State Superintendent.

Super All things considered, I should think a County Superintendent, at least for many years to come, would prove more suitable to our condition than one for an Assembly District or Judicial Circuit. The most of the Assembly Districts be

nem unable to maintain such an officer in service for period; and a Judicial Circuit would be too large for a Superintendent to properly visit and inspect the schools, examine candidates for teachers' certificates, thoroughly learn the condition of the schools, adjust wranglings and difficulties, and infuse a spirit of emulation and enthusiasm among the people on the subject of popular education. - Let the County Superintendent be elected by the people at the Spring election, so as to keep the office as distinct as possible from party politics; or let him be appointed by the County Board of Supervisors, or by the State Board of Education upon proper recommendations of fitness and qualification; to serve for three years, subject to removal, for just cause, by the State Superintenden or State Board of Education; and the State to appropriate out of the School Fund income, or General Fund, as the Legis. lature may direct, one hundred dollars annually to each County Superintendent, on condition that the county should pay at least as much more, and such County Superintendent should devote at least three months exclusively to the duties of his office; and the State to appropriate an additional one hundred dollars annually to each County Superintendent who should devote at least six months during the year exclusively to the duties of his office, and the county pay him at least as much more; and for the purposes here specified, such sparsely settled counties as Douglas and La Pointe, could be coupled together, at least until the next Legislative apportionment, and one Superintendent made to serve for the united counties. As remuneration for the two members of the Examining Board, to be associated with the County Superintendent, for the purpose of examining and granting certificates to teachers, a reasonable fee could be charged for each such examination--not for granting certificates, for that might possibly prove a temptation to grant them to unworthy aspirants; or the county could allow them a reasonable compensation.

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TOWNSHIP GOVERNMENT. There is a revolution going on in our country regarding th: division of Townships into geographical districts. The distrio system has been so long in general use, that the people are slou to discover its inequalities and inconveniences, and hesitate to make a change, even when convinced of a better arrangement. That the Township system of school government has many and decided advantages over the old district plan, let facts and experience testify:

“As a general fact,” says HORACE MANN, in his Tenth An nual Report as Secretary of the Massachusetts Board of Education, the schools of undistricted towns are greatly superior to those in districted towns; and for obvious reasons. The first class of towns,--the undistricted, provide all the schoolhouses, and, through the agency of the school committee, employ all the teachers. If one good school house is provided for any section of the town, all the other sections, having contributed their respective portions of the expense to erect the good house, will demand one equally good for themselves; and the equity of such a demand is so obvious, that it cannot be resisted. If, on the other hand, each section were a separate district, and bound for the whole expense of a new house, if it should erect one, it would be tempted to continue an old house, long after it had ceased to be comfortable; and, indeed, as expe

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