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But who is here ? Lysander on the ground:
Dead or asleep. I see no blood, no wound:
Lyfander, if you live, good Sir, awake.
Lys. And run thro' fire I will, for thy sweet sake.

[1'aking.
Transparent Helen, nature here shews art,
That through thy bosom makes me see thy heart.
Where is Demetrius? Oh, how fit a word
Is that vile name, to perish on my sword !

Hel. Do not say so, Lyfander, fay not so ;
What tho’ he love your Hermia? Lord, what tho'?
Yet llermia still loves you; then be content.

Lys. Content with Hermia? no: I do repent
The tedious minutes I with her have spent;
Not Hermia, but Helena I love :
Who will not change a raven for a dove?
The will of man is by his reason sway'd;
And reason says, you are the worthier maid.
Things, growing, are not ripe until their seafun;
So !, being young, 'till now ripe not to reason;
And, touching now the point of human skill,
Reason becomes the marihal to my will,
And leads me to your eyes ; where I o'erlook
Love's stories, written in love's richest book,

Hel. Wherefore was I to this keen mock’ry born?
When at your hands did I deserve this scorn:
Is't not enough, is't not enough, young man,
That I did never, no, nor never can,
Deserve a sweet look from Demetrius' eye,
Bat you must flout my insufficiency?
Good troth, you do me wrong; good sooth, you
In such disdainful manner me to woo :
Bot fare you well. Perforce I must confess,
I thought you Lord of more true gentleness:
Oh, that a Lady, of one man refus’d,
Should of another therefore be abus'd !

[Exitó
Lys. She sees not Hermia; Hermia, sleep thou there ;
And never may'st thou come Lysander near;
For as a surfeit of the sweetest things
The deepest loathing to the stomach brings ;,

Or..

do ;

E ti

Or as the hereGes, that men do leave,
Are hated molt of those they did deceive;
So thou, my surfeit and my heresy,
Of all be hated, but the most of me!
And all my pow'rs address your love and might
To honoor Helen, and to be her knight. [Exit.

Her. Help me, Lysander, help me! do thy best
To pluck this crawling serpent from my breaft:
Ay me, for pity, what a dream was here?
Lifander, look, how I do quake with fear;
Me-thought, a serpent eat my heart away;
And you sat smiling at his cruel prey :
Lysander ! what remov'd i Lysander, Lord!
What, out of hearing gone? no found, no word ?
Alack, where are you? - speak, and if you hear,
Speak, of all loves ; (I swoon almost, with fear.)
Noi-then I well perceive, you are not nigh;
Or death, or you, I'll find immediately.

(Exit. 23@o200030002043000.000

А с Т. IIF.

SCENE, the Wood.
Enter Quince, Snug, Bottom, Flute, Snout, and

Starveling.
The Qeeen of Fairies lying aseep..

В оттом.
RE we all met ?
A

Quin. Pat, pat; and here's a marvellous convenient place for our rehearsal. This green plot shall be our stage, this hauthorn-brake our iyring house, and we will do it in action, as we will do it before the Duke.

Bot. Peter Quince, Quin. What say'st thou, bully Bottom ? Bot. There are things in this comedy of Pyramus and Thisoy, that will never please. First, Pyramus must draw a sword to kill himself, which the Ladies cannot abide. How answer you that?

draw

Snout. By’rlaken, a parlous fear? Star. I believe, we must leave the killing out, when all is done.

Bot. Not a whit, I have a device to make all well ; write me a prologue, and let the prologue see in to say, we will do no harm with our Twords, and that Pyramus is not kill'd indeed ; and for more better assurance tell them, that I Pyramus am not Pyramus, but Burtom the weaver ; this will put them out of fear.

Quin. Well, we will have such a prologue, and is hall be written in eight and fix.

Bot. No, make it two more ; let it be written in eight and eight. Snout. Will not the Ladies be afraid of the lion? Star. I fear it, I promise you. Bot. Masters, you ought to consider with yourselves; to bring in, God field us, a lion among Ladies, is a molt dreadful thing; for there is not a more fearful wild-fowl than your lion living; and we ought to

Snout. Therefore another prologue must tell, he is. not a lion.

Bet. Nay, you must name his name, and half his face must be seen through the lion's neck; and he himlelf muft speak through, saying thus, or to the same defect; Ladies, or fair Ladies, I would wish you, or I would.. requeft you, or I would intreat you, not to fear, not to tremble; my life. for yours ; if you think, I come hither as a lion, it were picy of my life ; no; I am nosuch thing, I am a man as other men are; and there, indeed, let him name his name, and tell them plainly ho is Snug the joiner.

Quin. Well, it shall be fo; but there is two hard things

, that is, to bring the moonlight into a chamber; for, you know, Pyramus and Thisby met by moonlight.

Snug. Doth the moon shine that night we play our play?

Bot. A kalendar, a kalendar! look in the almanack; find out moon-shine, find out moon-fhine,

Quins.

look to it.

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Or as the hereges, that men do leave,
Are hated molt of those they did deceive:;.
So chou, my surfeit and my heresy,
Of all be hated, but the most of me!
And all my pow'rs address your love and might
To honoor Helen, and to be her knight.

[Exit.
Her. Help me, Lyfander, help me! do thy best
To pluck this crawling serpent from my breaft:
Ay me, for pity, what a dream was here?
Lyfander, look, how I do quake with fear ;;
Me-thought, a serpent eat my heart away ;.
And you fat smiling at his cruel prey:
Lysander ! what remov'd i Lyfander, Lord !
What, out of hearing gonez no found, no word ?
Alack, where are you? - speak, and if
Speak, of all loves; (I swoon almoft, with fear.)
No--then I well perceive, you are not nigh;
Or death, or you, I'll find immediately.

[Exit B00010.00.00.0

you hear,

A CT III.

SCENE, the Wood.
Enter Quince, Snug, Bottom, Flute, Snout, and

Starveling
The Qeeen of Fairies lying adeep.

В оттом.
RE we all met ?

Quin. Pat, pat; and here's a marvellous con venient place for our rehearsal. This green plot shall be our stage, this hauthorn-brake our tyring house, and we will do it in action, as we will do it before the Duke.

Bot. Peter Quince,

Quin, What say'st thou, bully Bottom ? Bot. There are things in this comedy of Pyramus and Tbify, that will never please. First, Pyramus must

ART

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draw

draw a sword to kill himself, which the Ladies cannot abide. How answer you that?

Snout. By’rlaken, a parlous fear? Star. I believe, we must leave the killing out, where all is done.

Bot. Not a whit, I have a device to make all well; write 'me a prologue, and let the prologue fee in to say, we will do no harm with pur Twords, and that Pyramus is not kill'd indeed; and for more better assurance tell them, that I Pyramus am not Pyramus, but Bortom the weaver ; this will put them out of fear.

Quin. Well, we will have such a prologue, and is Mall be written in eight and fix.

Bot. No, make it two more ; let it be written in eight and eight.

Snout. Will not the Ladies be afraid of the lion ?
Star. I fear it, I promise you.

Bot. Masters, you ought to consider with yourselves; to bring in, God lield us, a lion among Ladies, is a most dreadful thing; for there is not a more fearful wild-fowl than your lion living; and we ought to

Snout. Therefore another prologue must tell, he is not a lion.

Bit. Nay, you must name his name, and half his facer must be seen through the lion's neck; and he himleif muft speak through, saying thus, or to the fame defe&t; Ladies, or fair Ladies, I would wish you, or I would.. request you, or I would intreat you; not to fear, not to trumble; - my life for yours ; if you think, I come hither as a lion, it were picy of my life; no, I am nosuch thing, I am a man as other men are; and there, indeed, let him name his name, and tell them plainly ho is Snug the joiner.

Quin. Well, it shall be for; but there is two hard: things, that is, to bring the moon-light into a chamber; for, you know, Pyramus and Thisby met by moons, light.

Snug. Doth the moon shine that night we play our play?

Bot. A kalendar, a kalendar! look in the almanack; find out moon-shine, find out moon-thine,

look to it.

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