Ontologies for Software Engineering and Software Technology

Capa
Coral Calero, Francisco Ruiz, Mario Piattini
Springer Science & Business Media, 12 de out de 2006 - 340 páginas

Communication is one of the main activities in software projects, many such projects fail or encounter serious problems because the stakeholders involved have different understandings of the problem domain and/or they use different terminologies. Ontologies can help to mitigate these communication problems.

Calero and her coeditors mainly cover two applications of ontologies in software engineering and software techonology: sharing knowledge of the problem domain and using a common terminology among all stakeholders; and filtering the knowledge when defining models and metamodels.

The editors structured the contributions into three parts: first, a detailed introduction into the use of ontologies in software engineering and software technology in general; second, the use of ontologies to conceptualize different process-related domains such as software maintenance, software measurement, or SWEBOK, initiated by IEEE; third, the use of ontologies as artifacts in several software processes, like, for example, in OMG’s MOF or MDA.

By presenting the advanced use of ontologies in software research and software projects, this book is of benefit to software engineering researchers in both academia and industry.

 

O que estão dizendo - Escrever uma resenha

Não encontramos nenhuma resenha nos lugares comuns.

Páginas selecionadas

Conteúdo

72 SQL Evolution
198
2003
201
731 The Data Types Subontology
202
732 The Schema Objects Subontology
204
74 Example
209
75 Conclusions
212
References
214
8 The Object Management Group Ontology Definition Metamodel
217

173 Ontology Alignment and Merging
25
174 Ontology Evolution and Versioning
31
175 Ontology Evaluation
32
176 Ontology Implementation
34
18 Conclusions
38
19 Acknowledgements
39
2 Using Ontologies in Software Engineering and Technology
49
22 Kinds of Ontologies
50
221 Heavyweight Versus Lightweight Ontologies
56
23 A Review of the Uses in SET
57
231 Ontology Versus Conceptual Model
63
232 Ontology Versus Metamodel
64
233 Ontologies in Software Engineering Environments
65
234 Representing Ontologies Using Software Engineering Techniques
67
235 Experiences and Lessons Learned in Software Engineering Research
69
24 A Proposal of Taxonomy
73
241 Ontologies of Domain
74
242 Ontologies as Software Artifacts
76
25 Review and Classification of Proposals in the Literature
79
252 Proposals of Ontologies as Software Artifacts
86
References
95
Issues and Techniques
103
32 History and Principles of the SWEBOK Project
105
321 Hierarchical Organization
107
322 Reference Material and Matrix
108
33 The Ontology of the SWEBOK from a Conceptual and ConsensusReaching Perspective
109
34 The Ontology of the SWEBOK as a Formal Artifact
112
35 Fundamental Elements of the Ontology of the SWEBOK
114
352 Models Specifications and Methods
116
353 Theoretical Standpoints and Guidelines
117
36 Conclusions
119
References
120
4 An Ontology for Software Development Methodologies and Endeavours
122
42 Ontology Architecture
125
422 Usage and Ontology Domains
127
423 Product and Process
131
43 EndeavourRelated Concepts
133
431 HighLevel View
134
432 The Process Side
135
433 The Product Side
137
434 The Producer Side
140
Conclusion
141
44 MethodRelated Concepts
142
442 Duality in the Method Domain
143
443 Applying the Methodology
148
References
149
5 Software Maintenance Ontology
153
52 Software Maintenance
154
53 An Ontology for Software Maintenance
156
531 Overview of the Ontology
157
532 The System Subontology
158
533 The Computer Science Skills Subontology
160
534 The Maintenance Process Subontology
162
535 The Organizational Structure Subontology
165
536 The Application Domain Subontology
166
541 Quality Validation
167
542 Relevance Validation
168
55 Putting the Maintenance Ontology to Work
169
56 Conclusion
171
References
172
6 An Ontology for Software Measurement
174
62 Previous Analysis
177
63 A Running Example
178
64 The Proposal of Software Measurement Ontology
179
65 Conclusions
194
References
195
2003
197
81 Introduction
218
82 Why a MOF Ontology Metamodel?
219
822 Why MOF?
220
823 Why Not UML?
221
83 The Ontology Development Metamodel
222
831 RDFOWL Metamodel
224
832 Topic Maps
228
833 Common Logic
231
834 General Structure of Metamodels
233
84 Profiles and Mappings
235
842 UML Profiles
236
843 Mappings
238
844 Mapping CL
240
845 Interaction of Profiles and Mappings
241
85 Extendibility
242
852 Semantic Domain Models
243
853 nary associations
244
87 Acknowledgments
245
References
246
9 Ontologies Metamodels and the Model Driven Paradigm
248
92 Models and Ontologies
253
922 Whats in an Ontology?
255
93 Similarity Relations and Metamodelling
257
931 Metamodels
258
932 Metametamodels
260
933 The Metapyramid the Modelling Architecture of MDE
261
94 MDE and Ontologies
262
941 Domain and UpperLevel Ontologies
263
942 Relationship of Ontologies and System Models on Different Metalevels
264
943 Employing Domain Ontologies in the MDA
265
944 Conceptual Benefits of an OntologyAware Metapyramid
267
945 Tools Based on an OntologyAware Metapyramid
268
946 The megaModel of OntologyAware MDE
269
95 Related Work
270
96 Conclusions
271
10 Use of Ontologies in Software Development Environments
275
102 From SDE to DOSDE
277
103 DomainOriented Software Development Environment
279
1032 Task Ontology in DOSDE
280
Verbal Description
282
1033 Mapping Domain and Task
287
1034 Using Knowledge Throughout the Software Development
288
104 From DOSDE to EOSDE
292
105 EnterpriseOriented Software Development Environments
294
1051 Enterprise Ontology
296
106 Tools in DOSDE and EOSDE
300
1061 Domain Theory Browser
301
A Yellow Pages Software Tool
302
A Software Tool for Human Resource Planning
304
107 Conclusion
305
References
306
11 Semantic Upgrade and Publication of Legacy Data
310
112 Global Approach to DatabasetoOntology Mapping
314
113 Mapping Situations between Databases and Ontologies
315
114 The R2O Language
319
1141 A Mapping Description Specified in R2O
320
1142 Description of Database Schemas
321
1143 Definition of Concept Mappings
322
1144 Describing Conditions and Conditional Expressions
324
1145 Describing Transformations
325
1146 Attribute and Relation Mappings
326
115 The ODEMapster Processor
330
1161 Ontologies in the Funding Domain
332
Semantic Publishing and Navigation
334
117 Conclusions and Future Work
335
118 Acknowledgements
337
Direitos autorais

Outras edições - Visualizar todos

Termos e frases comuns

Sobre o autor (2006)

Francisco Ruiz is associate professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM) and Vice-Director of the Alarcos Research Group. He has been Dean of the UCLM Computer Science School for seven years and Data Processing Director at the same University for four years. His current research interests include: business process management systems, software process technology and modeling, software maintenance, and software projects planning and managing.

Coral Calero is Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM). Her research interests are: software quality metrics, quality models, web and portal quality, databases and data warehouse quality and software architectures.

Mario Piattini is a Certified Information System Auditor and a Certified information System Manager by ISACA (Information System Audit and Control Association) as well as a Full Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, in Ciudad Real, Spain. He leads the ALARCOS research group of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, in Ciudad Real, Spain. His research interests are: advanced databases, database quality, software metrics, security and audit, software maintenance.

Informações bibliográficas