On Taxation: How it is Raised and how it is Expended

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J. W. Parker, 1860 - 255 páginas
 

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Página 28 - The subjects of every state ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible, in proportion to their respective abilities ; that is, in proportion to the revenue which they respectively enjoy under the protection of the state.
Página 178 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Página 244 - King's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows : — GRANTS OUT OF CONSOLIDATED FUND 1.
Página 238 - No scutage or aid shall be imposed in our kingdom, unless by the general council of our kingdom ; except for ransoming our person, making our eldest son a knight, and once for marrying our eldest daughter; and for these there shall be paid a reasonable aid.
Página 89 - It is true I cannot prevent the introduction of the flowing poison ; gain-seeking and corrupt men will for profit and sensuality, defeat my wishes ; but nothing will induce me to derive a revenue from the vice and misery of my people.
Página 131 - Taxes upon the sale of land fall altogether upon the seller. The seller is almost always under the necessity of selling, and must, therefore, take such a price as he can get. The buyer is scarce ever under the necessity of buying, and will, therefore, only give such a price as he likes. He considers what the land will cost him in tax and price together. The more he is obliged to pay in the way 01 tax, the less he will be disposed to give in the way of price.
Página 41 - Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the State.
Página 239 - That levying money for or to the use of the crown, by pretence of prerogative, without grant of parliament, for longer time or in other manner than the same is or shall be granted, is illegal.
Página 132 - For the general prosperity, there cannot be too much facility given to the conveyance and exchange of all kinds of property, as it is by such means that capital of every species is likely to find its way into the hands of those, who will best employ it in increasing the productions of the country. " Why,
Página 222 - The expenses of a war,' said Mr. Gladstone, ' are the moral check which it has pleased the Almighty to impose upon the ambition and the lust of conquest that are inherent in so many nations.

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