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the re- | ligion of | Britain, 1 Y a- I gainst the I tyranny of Rome, I if these I worse than | popish | cruelties, 14 and inquisi- | torial | practices, | 7 are en- | dured a- | mong us. 17 41741 To I send | forth the merciless | Indian, 1741 thirsting for | blood ! | 7 a- I gainst whom? 17714 your | protestant | brethren! 1471 4 to lay | waste their | country, 'to | desolate their | dwellings, 17 and ex- | tirpate their | race and name, 17 by the | aid and instrumen- | tality of these un- | governable | savages ! 14714

| Spain can no longer | boast pre- | eminence yin bar- | barity. 171144 | She | armed herself with | bloodhounds 14 to ex- | tirpate the / wretched | natives of | Mexico; 177/wemore | ruthless, I loose those | brutal | warriors 14 a- / gainst our countrymen | 7 in A. | merica, 1 en- , deared to us | 4 by | every | tie | 7 that can | sanctify hu- | manity. 1711441 I | solemnly | call upon your | lordships, I and upon every | order of men in the state, 1 7 to stamp upon | this 7 | infamous pro- | cedure

the in- | delible | stigma of the public ab- | horrence. I 74147 | More par- | ticularly, 1 41 | call upon the / venerable | prelates 17 of our re- I ligion, 17 to 1 do a- I way this in- | iquity: 147 | let them per- / form a lus- | tration |

to | purify the country 1 7 from this | deep 7 14 and deadly | sin. 17417717 My I lords, I am | old |

and | weak, 17 and at / present 14 un- | able to say | more; 171 | but my | feelings and | indig. | nation were | too | strong to have al- | lowed me to say | less. 17714 417 1 | could not have slept | this night in my | bed, nor | even re- 1 posed my head upon my | pillow, |

4, with- | out giving / vent to my steadfast ab- | horrence 14 of such e- | normous | 7 and pre- | posterous princi. ples. 17114

TIMON'S ADDRESS TO THE THIEVES.

Timon. Why should you want? Be-hold, the earth

hath | roots; | 7 With-| in this mile break | forth a hundred / springs :

The oaks bear | mast, the briars / scarlet | hips : / 7 The bounteous | housewife, nature, 1 on each | bush | Lays her | full | mess be- | fore you. I 471 Want? | 1

why I want ? | 1st THIEF. 4 We cannot | live on | grass, on | berries,

| water, 1 4 As | beasts, and | birds, and | fishes. | Tim. 7 Nor on the beasts themselves, the birds,

and | fishes:1771441 You must | eat men. Yet | thanks I must you | con, That you are | thieves pro- | fessed; 1 that you I work not In | holier / shapes : 1 | for there is boundless | theft In | limited pro- | fessions. 1 7 | Rascal | thieves, | Here's | gold: 1 Go, | suck the subtle | blood of the grape, /

Till the high | fever seethe your blood to froth, |

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CÆSAR'S PASSAGE OF THE RUBICON.

4A | GENTLEMAN, 14 Mr. / Chairman, / speaking of | Cæsar's be- | nevolent dispo- | sition, and of the re- | luctance with which he | entered into the civil | war, | 70b-|| serves, I “How long did he pause upon the brink of the | Rubicon ?" 147147 | How | came he to the brink of| that | river? 174114 | How dared he | cross it? | 74 17717 Shall | private men re- | spect the I boundaries of| private / property, 17 and shall a | man | pay no re- | spect to the boundaries of his country's | rights? 44177! How I dared he | cross that | river ? 117410! but he paused upon the brink. 1 7 | He should have | perished upon the brink | ere he had | crossed it! 1 7:14

| Why did he | pause? 144141 | Why does a | man's heart | palpitate when he is on the point of com- | mitting an | unlawful | deed ? | 77 | Why does the murderer, his | victim | sleeping be- | fore him, and his / glaring | eye | taking the measure of the blow, | strike | wide of the mortal | part ? | 7 Be- | cause of conscience ! | 7 'Twas that made | Cæsar | pause upon the brink of the | Rubicon. 171471

Com- / passion ! 177177 | What com- | passion ? 17 The com- | passion of an as- sassin, that feels a | momentary | shudder, | 7 as his / weapon be- I gins to cut! i

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