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SPEECH OF THE EARL OF CHATHAM,

ON THE SUBJECT OF EMPLOYING INDIANS TO FIGHT AGAINST

THE AMERICANS.

7 I CANNOT, 14 my | lords, 14 I will not, | join in con- | gratu- | lation on mis- | fortune and dis- | grace. 1717 | This, my | lords, 14 is a | perilous 14 and tre- | mendous | moment; 1717 the smoothness of | flattery | cannot | save us in this | rugged and | awful | crisis. 17414714 It is now | necessary | 7 to in- / struct the throne in the language of truth. 14 41 1 We must, 11 4 if possible, | dis- | pel the de- lusion and darkness which en- velope it; 7 and dis- | play, 17 in its | full | danger 14 and genuine | colors, 17 the ruin which is | brought to our | doors. | 44144Can | ministers still pre- | sume to ex- | pect sup- | porty | in their in- | fatu- / ation ? | 14 Can parliament be so dead to its | dignity and duty, 17 as to give its sup- | port 1 4 to measures | thus ob- | truded and forced up- / on it? | 4 | Measures, 1 , my | lords, which have re- duced this late | flourishing | empire 4to scorn and con- | tempt? 1741 But | yesterday, 17 and | England | might have I stood against the / world; 17 now, 7 ) none so | poor | as to I do her | reverence! | 471 4 The people | (whom we at first de- / spised as | rebels, but | whom we now ac- | knowledge as I enemies), l are a- | betted a-1 gainst us, I sup- plied with | every | military | store, 17 their | interest con- | sulted,

and their am- | bassadors | enter- | tained by our in- | veterate | enemy; 170117 and | ministers do not, 17 and | dare not, I inter- / pose with | dignity | 7 or ef- | fect. | 711711 The | desperate state of our | army a- | broad 1 is in | part 1 | known. 177177 | No man | more highly es- | teems and honors the | English | troops than | I do: 1717 I know their | virtues 14 and their valor; 174141 | know they can a- | chieve anything but | impossi- / bilities; | 77 | and I know that the conquest of English A- | merica | is an impossi- | bility. 1 1741 You | cannot, / my | lords, you can- | not | conquer A- | merica. 17717 | What is your | present situ- / ation | there ? 1771 We do not know the worst: 171 | but we know that in three cam- | paigns we have done | nothing and suffered / much. 177! 44 | You may | swell every ex- | pense, 17 ac- cumulate every as- / sistance, | 4 and ex- | tend your | traffic to the | shambles of | every | German | despot; 14 | your at- 1 tempts will be for ever | vain and | impotent; 14

| doubly | so, in- | deed, 17 from this | mercenary | aid 14 on which you re- | ly; 71 74 | for it | irritates to an in- , curable re- | sentment, the minds of your adversaries, 1 to over- | run them with the mercenary | sons of rapine and plunder, 14 de- | voting | them and

their pos- | sessions to the ra- | pacity of | hireling | cruelty. 1471471

But, 17 my | lords, / who is the man, | that, in ad- | dition to the dis- | graces and mischiefs of the war, has dared to | authorize 14 and as- | sociate to our | arms | y the | tomahawk | 7 and scalping-knife of the | savage ? 1941 7 to call into | civilized al- | liance 17 the wild

and in human in- habitants of the woods ? | 471 4 to 1 • delegate 17 to the merciless | Indian 17 the defence of

dis- | puted | rights, | 7 and to | wage the horrors of his barbarous war | 1 | against our | brethren? 17414714 My | lords, I these e- | normities | cry a- | loud 1 for re- | dress and punishment. 144 | But, my | lords, 17 this barbarous | measure has been de- fended, 174 | not only on the principles of policy 17 and ne- | cessity, 17 but | also on | those of mo- / rality; 1 1 1 1 “for it is perfectly al- | lowable,” says | Lord | Suffolk, | 7 "to | use | all the | means which | God and nature | 7 have I put into our | hands."|77|77|I am as- | tonished !| 7 I am | shocked ! 17 to hear such | principles con- fessed; 1 411 to hear them a- | vowed in this house, or in this country. 14 4141 My lords, 141 did not in- | tend to en- ! croach so much on your at- | tention, | 71 | but I | cannot re- | press my | indig- | nation. 174111 | feel myself im- | pelled to I speak. 17114414 My | lords, 17 we are called upon, | 7 as members of this house, | 7 as | men, 14 as Christians,| 7 to pro- | test against | 7 such | horrible bar- | barity! 1441417 “That God and nature | have | put into our | hands!" | 74 | What i-|| deas of God and nature that , noble | lord may | entertain, | 41 | know not; 174 | but I | know that such de- | testable | principles 17 are equally ab- | horrent 1 7 to religion ! 4 and hu- | manity. 14714 | What, 11 4 to at- | tribute the sacred | sanction of God and nature 17 to the | massacres of the Indian | scalping-knife! | 7 to the | savage, | torturing | 7 and murdering his un- 1 happy | victims! | 4914 | Such | notions | shocky, every | sentiment of honor. 144147 | These a- | bomi- . nable | principles, and this | more a- | bominable a- | vowal of them, 17 de- | mand the most de- | cisive indig- | nation. 17417414 1 | call upon that I right 4 | reverend, 4 and | this most | learned Bench, to | vindicate the re- | ligion of their | God—41 4 to sup- | port the justice of their country. 174177171 | call upon the | bishops 17 to | inter- | pose the un- | sullied | sanctity of their | lawn; 1 771 upon the judges 1 to 1 inter- | pose the | purity of their | ermine, 17 to save us from this pol- | lution. i 4 717711 | call upon the honor of your | lordships, 4 to | reverence the dignity of your | ancestors, | and to maintain your own. 17417414 I call upon the spirit 14 and hu- | manity 1 of my | country, 14 to , vindicate the national character. 1 41 | I in- | voke the genius of the British | consti- | tution. 1471441 From the tapestry that a- | dorns | these | walls, 17 the im- | mortal | ancestor of this | noble | lord | frowns with | indig. | nation at the dis- | grace of his country. 17417914 In | vain did | he de- / fend the | liberty, 1 Y and es- | tablish

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