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* Document No. 132, House of Representatives, 3d Session, 27th Congress.

ex- | penditures of the Uni- | versity | during the | last | year, for the I general | purposes of the College, 17 the in- | struction of the under- | graduates, | and for the schools of law and di- | vinity, 14 a- | mount to | forty- 1 six | thousand nine | hundred and | forty- | nine dollars. 1 The cost of the 0- | hio for one year in | service, in | salaries, I wages, | 7 and pro- | visions, | 4 is | two | hundred and | twenty | thousand dollars ; 17 being | one hundred and | seventy- / five | thousand | dollars | more than the | an. nual ex. | penditures of the Uni- | versity; | more than | four | times as | much. 1741 In other / words, 1 for the annual | sum which is | lavished on one ship of the line, four insti- | tutions, like | Harvard Uni- | versity, | might be sus- | tained through- | out the country! ||

SUMNER.

INDUSTRY NECESSARY TO THE ATTAINMENT

OF ELOQUENCE.

. 7 The history of the world 1 7 is full of testimony |

to prove | how much de- / pends upon | industry; 174 | not an eminent | orator | has | lived | but is an example of it. 177 | Yet, in | contra- | diction to all | this, 1

the almost | uni- versal | feeling ap- | pears to be 14 that | industry | 7 can ef- . fect | nothing; 1 that | eminence 17 is the re- sult of accident, and that every one must be con- | tent to re- | main | just what he may | happen to 1 be. 1 | Thus / multitudes, 17 who come forward as teachers and | guides, suffer them- | selves to be i satisfied with the most in- , different at- | tainments, 14 and a miserable | medi- | ocrity, 17 with | out so much as in- | quiring | how they may | rise | higher, 144 | much | less | making | any at- | tempt to | rise.

For | any | other | art | they would have | served an ap| prenticeship, | 7 and would be a- | shamed to | practice it in public be- | fore they had | learned it. 1771 If I any one would | sing, 1 he at- | tends a | master, 1 Y and is | drilled in the very | ele- mentary | principles ; | 7 and | only | after the most la- | borious | process | dares to | exercise his voice in | public. 17 | This he | does, I though he has | scarce | anything to learn but the me- | chanical | exe- | cution of what | lies in | sensible | forms be- | fore the | eye. | 77 | But the ex- | tempore I speaker, / who is to in- | vent as well as to | utter, 1 7 to carry on an ope- | ration of the mind, 17 as well as to pro- | duce | sound, I 77 | enters upon the work with | out pre- / paratory | discipline, and then I wonders that he | fails. 177 | If he were | learning to play on the flute for public exhibition, 1 what | hours 1 hand | days would he spend 17 in I giving fa- cility to his fingers, | 7 and at- | taining the power of the swiftest and most ex- | pressive exe- | cution! 144If he were de- | voting him- | self to the organ, | what | months and | years would he | labor, / that he might | know its | compass, and be | master of its | keys, and be able to draw | out, at I will, all its | various combi- | nations of har- | monious / sounds, and its | full | richness and delicacy of ex- | pression !771

7 And | yet he will | fancy that the grandest, 1 the most / various, and most ex- | pressive of all | instruments which the | infinite Cre- | ator has | fashioned, by the , union of an | intel- | lectual | soul with the | powers of speech, I may be played upon with- | out | study or | practice. 1 471 4 He comes to it 1 | a | mere , unin

structed tyro, 4 and I thinks to manage | all its stops, 1 and com- | mand the whole | compass of its | varied 17 and | compre- | hensive power! | 4 he finds himself a | bungler | in the at- tempt, is mortified | 7 at his failure, and settles it in his mind for ever | that the at- | tempt is / vain. 1471471

Success in every | art, what | ever may be the natural | talent, 14 is always the re- | ward of industry and | pains. 1771 But the instances are / many, 1 of| men of the finest | natural | genius, / whose be- / ginning has / promised | much, but | who have de- / generated | wretchedly | as they ad- | vanced, 17 be- / cause they | trusted to their | gifts, 17 and | made / no | efforts to im- | prove. 17 | That there have never been other | men of equal en- | dowments with De- | mosthenes and I Cicero, 177 ) none would | venture to sup- | pose ; 1 but | who have / so de- | voted them- | selves to their ) art, |, or be- come equal in | excellence ? 1 717 If | those / great | men had been con- | tent like others to con- | tinue as they be- / gan, | - and had I never | made their | perse-1 vering | efforts for im- | provement, 1 7 | what would their | countries have benefited from their | genius, 17 or the | world have known of their fame? They would have been lost in the undis- | tinguished | crowd that sunk to ob- | livion a- | round them. 1771

H. WARE.

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