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wounds / self- | love, 1 yor | shocks, per- | haps, a | too fas- | tidious | taste, 1 or | irritates temper, there are calls for self-con- | trol, 1 for the softening of | slight as- | perities, 1 for | wise 1 silence, 1 yor | prudent | speech, 1 for | some slight re. | linquishment, | all of which are | tests of | Christian | character— 4 | some of them the very | hardest | tests to , which | character I could be sub- | jected. 1471

Let re- | ligionists / speak as I slightingly as they | may in | these days, / when, in some / quarters, re- | ligious ex: | citement and ma- | chinery seem to have taken the place of the old, | unosten- | tatious, | private, I simple | ways of 1 piety-147 | let them I speak | slightingly of all as- | surance and | evidence 17 which I do not come from | mystical | raptures, | he | cannot be | very | far from the right | path, 14 at | least from its | entrance, 17 who, be- | cause he | wishes to be a child of God, 17 suc- | ceeds in | even | such a little thing as this 94 | being | gentle, | where he was once | harsk; | truthful, where he was once | careless in | speech; 17 for-| giving, | where he was once vin- | dictive. 47 | Yes, I even though his whole | struggle to | this / end may have been a- | mong | trivial de- | tails, | having, ex- cept as re- gards him- | self, ! meagre re- sults. 1771

When a man | says, in | common | phrase, / It is a | great | thing to be re- | ligious, 17 he | speaks | truly. 177 | But it is not always | doing what | he calls a great thing, i 7 or in | placing him-1 self in the way of con- | spicuous and | striking | instrumen- | talities, y that he | is to seek to be re- I ligious. from | thee ; 1 1 but the night | shineth as the day: 1 4714 the darkness and the light 71 are | both a- I like to / thee. 1741471

77 | If, when he | speaks | thus, he | means | that there is | something | so mo- | mentous, 177 | so vast, a- | bout re- | ligion, 17 that it is to be sought ex- | clusively a- | mid | influences and e- | motions | lying | out of common ex- | perience, 14 and every-day | effort, 177 | he is in error.

Re- | ligion is | vast, 177 | infinite 1 Y in its | scope. I But these terms do not at- | tach to | this | simple | question :- Shall I do | right or / wrong, as it | meets me to- | day? 1 4 Yet, / who shall | say that I that I question is not a mo- | mentous one? 1741 It is not a | great | thing to make a small | sacrifice of comfort, or | ease, or | interest, | 7 for the sake of a principle, or an- | other's | happiness. It is not a great | thing to I say to one's | self, I will do I thus much— 4 I will | break off to. | day 17 that one | bad habit. 471

This is not doing a great deal, 7 and yet | on my a- | bility to do it, de- / pends the question, I whether I shall | do | anything? 14 | whether I shall | ever be a re- | ligious | man or | no? 177 | whether I | shall or shall | not | even be- / gin to be a re- | ligious / man? 1741

“Gather | up the fragments,” | 7 said | Jesus. 1 714 The soul that is | truly I wise 4 is prudent, 441 thrifty. 17 It ) gathers | up | what the others | disre- | regard. 17714 It will | waste | nothing, 17 fore-l go ! nothing, which helps | character. 1791

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SUMNER ON WAR.

7 An- | OTHER | prejudice in favor of war | Mis | founded on the | practice of | nations, | past and present. 17717 There is no crime or e- | normity in morals, which | may not find the sup- | port of human ex- | ample; 1791 often on an ex- | tended | scale. 1771 But it | cannot be | urged in our day, 177 | that we are to look for a | standard of duty 4 in the conduct of | vain, | fallible | man. 147 14 It is not in the power of man by | any | subtle | alchemy, 14 to trans- | mute / wrong into | right. I 471 Be- | cause I war is ac- | cording to the | practice of the world, it cannot follow | that it is | right. 1971

For | ages 14 the world / worshipped | false / gods; 17 but | these gods were | not less | false because | all | bowed be- | fore them. 17417 At | this | moment the larger / portion of man- | kind are | Heathen; 1 but | Heathenism is | not | true. 144714 It was once the practice of nations to slaughter | prisoners of war; 1 7 but even the spirit of | war re- | coils now from this | bloody | sacrifice. 1 71 In | Sparta, | theft, | 4 in stead of being

| judged as a | crime, / was, by a per- / verse mio- rality, 14 like | war it- | self, I dignified | into an | art and an ac- | complishment; 1 717 like I war | it was ad- | mitted | into the system of | youthful edu- | cation; , and it was en- | lightened, like | war | also, by an | instance of un- | conquerable | firmness, which is a bar- | baric | counterfeit of | virtue. 1771 4 The Spartan | youth who al- | lowed the stolen | fox be- | neath his | robe to | eat into his heart, 17 is an ex- | ample of mis- | taken | fortitude, | not un- I like that which we are | asked to ad- | mire in the / soldier. 17 7 | Other illus- | trations of this character | crowd upon the mind; 17 but I will not dwell upon them. 14714 We | turn with dis- | gust from | Spartan | cruelty, and the | wolves of Ta | ygetus; 1 from the awful | cannibalism 17 of the Fee- | jee | Islands; 1 from the pro- | fane | rites of in- | numerable | savages ; 1 7 from the crushing | Juggernaut; 1 7 from the | Hindoo | widow | lighting her | funeral | pyre; 1 from the Indian | dancing at the stake. 1471 But | had not | all these in their re- / spective | places and | days, 1 like | war, the sanction of es- | tablished | usage? 1771

But it is often | said, 1741“Let us | not be wiser than our fathers.” 14 | Rather let us | try to ex- | cel our | fathers in | wisdom. Let us | imitate | what in them was | good, but not | bind ourselves, | as in the chains of fate, by their im- | perfect ex- | ample. | 77 | Principles are | higher than | human ex- | amples. 11714 Ex- | amples may be followed | when they ac- | cord with the | admo- | nitions of duty. 1471 4 But he is un- I wise and wicked

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