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pre- | vailed, | and there was | plainly to be seen, ex- | pressed in the countenance of each of the sons, his | hopes of 1 being the lucky re- | ceiver of the de- / sired | prize. 1471

The old | man | put his | tremulous | hand | into the hat, | 7 and | drew out the name of | Anta- | nacio, 1 the i second son! 1771 My friends, I | hardly | know how to ex- | press to you the new | scene which I then broke | in upon me! 147 | Anta- | nacio, 1 upon | hearing his | name called, I broke into | praises 7 to the Om- niscient 1 7 for ac- cording him | such a | boon. 7414 With his | hands | clasped, and eyes di- | rected to heaven, | 7he re| peated over and over his I thanks, I then | fell upon his | knees before his | venerable parent, and 1 bathed his sandaled | feet with | tears of | frantic | joy. 1 4 414 The í other | brothers followed his ex- | ample, and em- | braced the feet of the good old | patriarch, 17 who re- | mained like a statue, op- | pressed with e- / motions 7 to / which he knew not how to give vent. 1741

Such a | scene | melted | all who I witnessed it, 17 a-1 mong / whom | were the lieu- | tenant of | police, the Al- | calde | Don Al- | tano, 17 and some other | friends. |

The brothers, then re- | tired, but soon re- | turned with a | fresh de- | mand, 17 which I was, that I should com- | mand that | since Anta- | nacio had been | favored by | lot with the charge of the | father, 1 7 they | could not be de- | prived of the pleasure of taking | out the / old | man to walk, by | turns, in the after- | noon; | 7 which | order I gave magis- | terially, / in / order to

gratify these simple, honest | people, 17 and they ) then re- | tired con- | tented. 1441

This | humble , family, of | Indian ex- | traction, 14 is! named | Villiavi- | cencio. 1 They are natives of the val. ley of Cho- | rillo, but at | present re- | side at | Callao.

MINOR MORALS.

It has been truly | said 1 that “the most | solemn and | fearful | interests of life | de- pend on | things in them- / selves | slight. 1 4714 The greatest I man that I ever | lived 4 was de- / pendent for character and happiness 74 | far more upon his | little | acts, 17 than upon his 1 great a chievements."|7914 The principle | here I stated 17 will ad- | mit of various illus- | trations. 17 The unspeakable / worth of | little things in conduct and / character, 1 7 the | mischief of disre- / garding their im. 1 portance y in our i- | deals of happiness, and in our en- | deavors after | moral and re- | ligious / progress, will | readily ap- | pear from a few con- | sider. I ations.

Generally | speaking, | happiness de- | pends / more on at- | tention to small 17 than to | great things. 1741 Want of self-con- | trol in | trifles, 17 the sensitiveness of | vanity, , petty | passions, | habits of o- | mission, | rather than of actual | wrong-doing-177 | these, per- | haps, | more than what are called | great | trials, | trouble our se- | renity. 17 | Crimes | cause | less / misery than | do these small neg- | lects and carelessnesses, 1 Yinto / which ! people , constantly | fall, 17 who have | not very | quick | moral per- | ceptions. 1771771

Who does not I know that one may never | violate one of the ten com- | mandments, 17 and 1 yet be / constantly the cause of an- | noyance to all con- | nected with him, |

by | thoughtless | disre- / gard of their | feelings, by careless / speech, | 7 an un- | comfortable | temper, 14 an in- ordinate self-| love, y by meanness in trifles, 17 by | slight de- / partures in these and other | ways 17 from the strict | law of justice and good | feeliny ? 1171 How many more | little stings there are | darted | than there are heavy | blows | struck at our | every day | comfort and en- | joyment! 1 7 On what | small | things does the | happiness of home de- / pend! | If | they be | lacking, | how | poorly do / such | things as competence, 17 re- / specta- | bility, | culture, 1 health, 1 sup- | ply their place! 14417 An in- | creased | modicum of patience | under the | minor ills of life; 1 7a | firm re- | solve | not to let | these / vex him so much; 1 4 a gentler | tone; 1 ya | readiness to do un- | asked | some little | favor, | make some little | sacrifice; 77 | small at- | tentions; the simple question | asked and answered as it should be 771 is it | well for my | character, 17 to say | nothing of others' | comfort, that | all the ar- | rangements and plans of this household | should revolve a- | round | my con- venience, 1 1o|my| taste, ex- | clusively, 17 as | if

there were no others to be consulted ? 17 | Is it too | much to say, | 7 that, in many cases, 17 a cor- | rection in | even one of these mi- | nute par- | ticulars, 17 would | bring a- | bout | that which the man or woman | covets | most, 17 | feels the want of | most, al happy | home. 1771771

The greatest obstacles which | hinder re- I ligious attainments and progress, | 7 are a- 1 mong / small things.

y To say nothing of the truth, that the most fla- . gitious | crime, 17 the lowest | depths of evil, I had a be- ' ginning in | what was | trifling, 14 the | bad ef- fect of | little o- | missions, 1 yin- dulgences, | carelessness, 17 can hardly be ex- | aggerated. 1771 7 It would | seem as 1 if it were not very difficult | 7 to reach a certain point of moral at- tainment. There is a certain | general | average of character, which con- / sists in ex- | emption from what is | heinous, | 77 | positively im- | moral in conduct, which | many | reach. 1441 But how | few I go be- / yond it ! 17 How | few | are there whose | lives are a con- | tinual | progress 1 y in the di- | vine | life; 1 al gradual, per- | haps, but | none the less certain ad- | vance in | love to | God and | man. 141

7 Per- haps the very | narrow | defi- | nition of the single | word "sal- | vation," has something to do with |this. 17 | Many | seem con- | tent with | saving them- | selves from what they | deem the retri- | butions of a | thoroughly | evil and 1 sinful | life, 14 for- 1 getting that sal- | vation, in the | large, | true sense of the term, 14 means | growth, | progress, 14 de- | liverance from | all that

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