The Midsummer Medley: A Series of Comic Tales ... in Prose and Verse, Volume 2

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H. Colburn & R. Bentley, 1832
 

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Página 181 - Britannia's golden mine, a rich Peru ! How his eyes languish ! how his thoughts adore That painted coat, which Joseph never wore ! He shows, on holidays, a sacred pin, That touch'd the ruff, that touch'd Queen Bess's chin...
Página 145 - L'art de tromper les yeux par les couleurs, L'art plus heureux de séduire les cœurs, De cent plaisirs font un plaisir unique.
Página 178 - Love is merely a madness; and, I tell you, deserves as well a dark house and a whip as madmen do...
Página 1 - CRY Holiday! Holiday! let us be gay, And share in the rapture of heaven and earth ; For see ! what a sunshiny joy they display, To welcome the Spring on the day of her birth; While the elements, gladly outpouring their voice, Nature's Paean...
Página 1 - Holiday! Holiday! let us be gay, And share in the rapture of heaven and earth ; For see! what a sunshiny joy they display, To welcome the Spring on the day of her birth; While the elements, gladly outpouring their voice, Nature's Paean proclaim, and in chorus rejoice!
Página 175 - The Queen of Night, whose large command Rules all the sea, and half the land, And over moist and crazy brains, In high spring-tides, at midnight reigns, Was now declining to the west, To go to bed and take her rest...
Página 166 - He told us he had been thirty years employing his thoughts for the improvement of human life. He had two large rooms full of wonderful curiosities, and fifty men at work ; some were condensing air into a dry tangible substance by extracting the nitre and letting the aqueous or fluid particles percolate; others softening marble for pillows and pin-cushions ; others petrifying the hoofs of a living horse to preserve them from foundering.
Página 98 - On the Downs you are like an old jacket, Hung up in the sunshine to dry ; In the town you are all in a racket, With donkey-cart, whiskey, and fly.
Página 179 - The lunatic, the lover, and the poet," says Shakspeare, (who very properly lumps them together) " are of imagination all compact ;" and elsewhere he observes, " Love is merely madness, and deserves as well a dark house and a whip as madmen do ; and the reason why they are not so punished and cured is, that the lunacy is so ordinary that the whippers are in love too.
Página 74 - It is bristled with thorns, I confess; But so is the much-flatter'd Rose : Is the Sweetbriar lauded the less Because amid prickles it grows ? 'Twere to cut off an epigram's point, Or disfurnish a knight of his spurs, If we foolishly wish'd to disjoint Its arms from the lance-bearing Furze. Ye dabblers in mines, who would clutch The wealth which their bowels enfold, See ! Nature, with Midas-like touch, Here turns a whole common to gold.

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