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The park is very extensive, but nature has in a great degree with held those beauties and that variety by which alone the true picturesque is constituted.

There is a small artiliçial lake, but it seldom comes into the composition of the landscape. It is not visible from the house, nor from the more frequented parts of the park. The embellished division of these grounds is a series of linear terraces, flanked by piantations of shrubs and evergreens, and adorned with a few small buildings, of no other merit than as they afford shelter and mark the distances. Near the wall a path'serpentines under a close covert. Lord Bathurst was engaged in converting an uncultivated down into its present state, at the same time that his friend, Lord Cobham, at Stowe, was creating Ely: sian fields. The sameness of the ground ai Cirencester rendered a picturesque effect difficult, if not wholly impracticable: and the performance confers on Lord Bathurst a superior credit. That of priority of design is certainly due to him, for till the art of modern gardening had been introduced by Kent and Browne, and applied in so universal a degree, this park had no rival, excepting those at Stowe and Mr. Pelham's at Esher. With a liberality, by which the old nobleman was distinguished through life, he extended the advantages of his place to the public, by allowing uninterrupted access, an indulgence which has been continued by his successors.

Connected with the park, about two miles on the road to Stroudwater, a majestic woodland stretches itself, called Oakley, planted by Lord Bathurst, the shade of which he lived to enjoy with philosophic calmness.

Ingentem meminit parvo qui germine quercum,
Æquævumque videt consenuisse nemus.

Claudian.
A neighbouring wood born with himself he sees;
And loves his own contemporary trees.

Cowley. There are ten very ample and extensive avenues diverging from a centre, but their terminations are not made, in every instance, by objects of importance. These were planted in a radiated form, in emulation of the grove of Chantilly and others in France, so laid out as producing an extraordinary effect of grandeur, under the auspices of Louis XIV. The more frequent and beautiful trees are large beech and fir in every stage of growth and foliage; their trunks are not ex. posed, but handsomely fringe the avenues

“ Nigra nemus abiete cingunt." Æn. viii. 596. To this circumstance the German forests owe their principal beauty. In the deepest recess stands a modern ruin, which, from a iradition of Saxon history is called " Alfred's Hall," conjectured, by a convenient fietion, to have been the place where he signed a territorial treaty with the Danes. To speak the truth, it has no prototype, nor does it resemble any castle of any age or country. The walls, however, are

now

now very happily invested with ivy, and the shade is delightful on a sultry day. Lord Bathurst was not so successful in this imitation as Lord Cobham at Stowe, where the gothic temple is still of no definite style or æra.

England possesses a decided advantage over every nation of Europe with respect to the superb environs of the noblemen's palaces. The forests and parks in Germanyand Italy are left in a state of nature, excepting avenues made for the high roads. We are not prepared for the sight of a castle or palace, as in Engl ind, by a display of superior cultivation or characteristic accompaniments. Their whole expence is confined to the house itself and the gardens, which in their archi. tectural plans are scarcely less sumptuous. But nature, embellished only, and not subdued, and what has been called landscape gardening they do not understand, and are too prejudiced ever to adopt. In France, indeed, the royal country residences, and those of the higher nobility under the former government, are laid out in a style intended to give an immediate impression of the vast extent of the domain which surrounds them. But these are few and peculiar, and do not authorise a national comparison.

In the beginning of the last century, when Lord Bathurst first planted Oakley, the subjecting a whole district of country to the one grand mansion, occurred but in few instances.

ÁN EARLY POEM OF DR. DARWIN,

To the Editor of the Atheneum. Sir,

I SEND you a curiosity, like most curiosities, of no great value, but still I should hope not unworthy your acceptance. It is the juvenile production of a man who, though he will not be ranked with the classical poets of our language, certainly belongs to the distinguished literati of the age: a poem, by Dr. Darwin, written more than half a century ago. This little piece has lately been published in Germany, in an appendix to an interesting pamphlet.

On the 29th of April last Dr. Reimarus,* of Hamburg, a physician of eminence, and a respectable author on a variety of subjects, principally medical and philosophical, celebrated the jubilee of his academical title of M.D. On this occasion the amiable and venerable with the weight of 78 years enjoys a green old age and the unbounded love and reverence of his fellow citizens, after a long life spent in a series of patriotic and benevolent exertions, was presented with a biographical memoir of himself, written by his friend Dr. Veit. In this memoir we learn that Dr. Reimarus studied at Edinburgh in the years

1754-6,

sage, who

+ Son of Reimarus, who wrote a work on the Instinct of Animals, which, if I mistake not, as well as the same author's Defence of Natural Religion, has been translated into English. The elder Reimarus's works have something of the fone and tendency of the popular writings of Derham. Vol. II,

с

The park is very extensive, but nature has in a great degree withheld those beauties and that variety by which alone the true picturesque is constituted.

There is a small artificial lake, but it seldom comes into the composition of the landscape. It is not visible from the house, nor from the more frequented parts of the park. The embellished division of these grounds is a series of linear terraces, flanked by piantations of shrubs and evergreens, and adorned with a few small buildings, of 10 other merit than as they afford shelter and mark the distances. Near the wall a path serpentines under a close covert. Lord Bathurst was engaged in converting an uncultivated down into its present state, at the same time that his friend, Lord Cobham, at Stowe, was creating Ely; sian fields. The sameness of the ground ai Cirencester rendered a picturesque effect difficult, if not wholly impracticable; and the performance confers on Lord Bathurst a superior credit. That of priority of design is certainly due to him, for till the art of modern gardening had been introduced by Kent and Browne, and applied in so universal a degree, this park had no rival, excepting those at Stowe and Mr. Pelham's at Esher. With a liberality, by which the old nobleman was distinguished through life, he extended the advantages of his place to the public, by allowing uninterrupted access, an indulgence which has been continued by his successors.

Connected with the park, about two miles on the road to Stroud. water, a majestic woodland stretches itself, called Oakley, planted by Lord Bathurst, the shade of which he lived to enjoy with philosophic calmness.

Ingentem meminit parvo qui germine qnercum,
Æquævumque videi consenuisse nemus.

Claudian.
A neighbouring wood born with himself he sees
And loves his own contemporary trees.

Cowley.

There are ten very ample and extensive avenues diverging from a

centre, but their terminations are not made, in every instance, by objects of importance. These were planted in a radiated form, iu emůlation of the grove of Chantilly and others in France, so laid out as producing an extraordinary effect of grandeur, under the auspices of Louis XIV. The more frequent and beautiful trees are large beech and fir in every stage of growth and foliage; their trunks are not ex. posed, but handsomely fringe the avenues

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To this circumstance the German forests owe their principal beauty. In the deepest recess stands a modern ruin, which, from a tradition of Saxon history is called " Alfred's Hall," conjectured, by a convenient fiction, to have been the place where he signed a territorial treaty with the Danes. To speak the truth, it has no prototype, nor does it resemble any castle of any age or country. The walls, however, are

now

now very happily invested with ivy, and the shade is delightful on a sultry day. Lord Bathurst was not so successful in this imitation aś Lord Cobham at Stowe, where the gothic temple is still of no definite style or æra.

England possesses a decided advantage over every nation of Europe with respect to the superb environs of the noblemen's palaces. The forests and parks in Germanyand Italy are left in a state of nature, excepting avenues made for the high roads. We are not prepared for the sight of a castle or palace, as in Engl ind, by a display of superior cultivation or characteristic accompaniments. Their whole expence is confined to the house itself and the gardens, which in their architectural plans are scarcely less sumptuous. But nature, embellished only, and not subdued, and what has been called landscape gardening, they do not understand, and are too prejudiced ever to adopt. In France, indeed, the royal country residences, and those of the higher nobility under the former government, are laid out in a style intended to give an immediate impression of the vast extent of the domain which surrounds them. But these are few and peculiar, and do not authorise a national comparison.

In the beginning of the last century, when Lord Bathurst first planted Oakley, the subjecting a whole district of country to the one grand mansion, occurred but in few instances.

AN EARLY POEM OF DR. DARWIN.

To the Editor of the Athenaum. Sir,

I SEND you a curiosity, like most curiosities, of no great value, but still I should hope not unworthy your acceptance. It is the juvenile production of a man who, though he will not be ranked with the classical poets of our language, certainly belongs to the distinguished literati of the age: a poem, by Dr. Darwin, written more than half a century ago. This little piece has lately been published in Germany, in an appendix to an interesting pamphlet.

On the 29th of April last Dr. Reimarus, * of Hamburg, a physician of eminence, and a respectable author on a variety of subjects, principally medical and philosophical, celebrated the jubilee of his academical title of M.D. On this occasion the amiable and venerable sage, who with the weight of 78 years enjoys a green old age and the unbounded love and reverence of his fellow citizens, after a long life spent in a series of patriotic and benevolent exertions, was presented with a biographical memoir of himself, written by his friend Di'. Veit. In this memoir we learn that Dr. Reimarus studied at Edinburgh in the years

1754-6,

Son of Reimarus, who wrote a work on the Instinct of Animals, which, if I mistake not, as well as the same author's Defence of Natural Religion, has been translated into English. The elder Reimarus's works have something of the tone and tendency of the popular writings of Derhanı. Vol. II,

с

1754-6, where he formed a close friendship with Dr. Darwin. On the 29th of April, 1757, Reimarus took his doctor's degree at Leyden, and on this occasion received the congratulatory poem which is now for the first time made public. : This production certainly will not add much tothe author's reputation, and a scrupulous friend of the Doctor's might hesitate before he withdrew it from obscurity; but its publication, though in a foreign country, must sooner or later make it known at home; and after all, it is no disgrace to the writer; for (and this alone would render even a worse performance interesting) the author's poetical taste and character were already formed; and the future author of the Botanic Garden, published so many years afterwards, is discernible in these occasional verses.

We find here the same frigid allegorisation, the same far fetched epithets, and, in endeavour, if not in execution, the same polished phraseology and laboured rhythmus. This gives an unquescionable interest to the poem.

I am, Sir, &c.

H.C.R, Altona, May, 1807.

THE MEDICAL COURTSHIP.

BY E. DARWIN.

In manhood's dawn, when first soft hairs begin
To yield a timorous umbrage to the chin';
Reimarus pray'd, Ye powers celestial hear,
Send me a wife, and bless the loving pair.
Her favourite youth the blue-eyed goddess spy'd,

Father of gods and men, eh Jove! (she cry'd)
“ Grant me unerring wisdom to employ,
" And chuse a damsel for my favourite boy."
The godhead nods—and at her wing'd command
Before the youth three Sister-beauties stand,
Each with soft words his tender bosom warms,
And hand in hand display their rival charms.
First genile Bolany the swain address’d,
One early rose-bud blush'd upon her breast,
She bade the Spring for him her sweets unfold,
Green'd the young herb, and dip'd the flower in gold.
Next pensive Chemia lifts the magic wand,
And changing forms obey her waving hand;
Metallic trees advance their silver stems,
Bud into gold, and blossom into gems.
Last young Analome steps forth, and throws
The clouds of superstition from her brows,
Harmless she smiles upon the crimson kuife,
Untwists each nerve, and treads the walks of life.

He

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