The British Poets, Volume 1

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Little, Brown & Company, 1866
 

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Página 14 - A sect, whose chief devotion lies In odd perverse antipathies ; In falling out with that or this, And finding somewhat still amiss ; More peevish, cross, and splenetic, Than dog distract or monkey sick...
Página 138 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar-school ; and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used ; and, contrary to the king, his crown, and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill.
Página 25 - Still they are sure to be i' th' right. 'Tis a dark-lanthorn of the spirit, Which none see by but those that bear it ; A light that falls down from on high, For spiritual trades to cozen by ; An ignis fatuus that bewitches And leads men into pools and ditches, To make them dip themselves, and sound For Christendom in dirty pond ; To dive, like wild-fowl, for salvation, And fish to catch regeneration.
Página 5 - And styled of war as well as peace. (So some rats of amphibious nature Are either for the land or water.) But here our authors make a doubt Whether he were more wise or stout.
Página 7 - He'd run in debt by disputation, And pay with ratiocination : All this by syllogism true, In mood and figure he would do. For rhetoric, he could not ope His mouth, but out there flew a trope : And when he happen'd to break off I' th" middle of his speech, or cough, H...
Página xvi - While Butler, needy- wretch, was yet alive, No generous patron would a dinner give; See him, when starved to death and turn'd to dust, Presented with a monumental bust. The poet's fate is here in emblem shown, He ask'd for bread, and he received a stone.
Página 7 - He'd undertake to prove by force Of argument, a man's no horse; He'd prove a buzzard is no fowl, And that a lord may be an owl; A calf an alderman, a goose a justice, And rooks committee-men and trustees.
Página 17 - So learned Taliacotius', from The brawny part of porter's bum, Cut supplemental noses, which Would last as long as parent breech, But when the date of Nock was out, Off dropt the sympathetic snout.
Página 12 - For his religion it was fit To match his learning and his wit: 'Twas Presbyterian true blue, For he was of that stubborn crew Of errant saints, whom all men grant To be the true Church Militant...
Página 3 - When civil dudgeon first grew high, And men fell out they knew not why? When hard words, jealousies, and fears, Set folks together by the ears...

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