An historical and critical review of the civil wars in Ireland, from the reign of queen Elizabeth to the settlement under ki ng William. With the state of the Irish Catholics from that settlement to 1778

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Puritan bishops in Ireland
74
The king thanks the Irish for their supply but order
84
The state of the Irish under Charles I
92
CHAY
96
Lord Wentworths manner of modelling the Irish parlia
105
A convocation of the clergy of Ireland 119
119
BOOK VIII
125
The court of wards and high commission in Ireland
135
Complaints of grievances
143
The catholic clergy of Ireland unjustly accused of stirring
149
BOOK V
159
The origir al depositions now in the possession of the uni
174
V The original examinations further considered
177
Concerning the number of murders
178
The humanity of the chiefs of the insurgents
181
The conduct of the catholic clergy during the insurrection
189
The first cause of the insurrections increasing
192
The same subject continued
194
Further misconduct of the lords justices
197
The nobility and gentry of the pale banished from Dublin
200
The justices invite the lords of the pale to a conference
201
The gentlemen of the pale assemble at Swords
204
The lords justices violate the public faith
205
The order for a general pardon limited by the justices
207
Lords justices orders concerning Roman catholic priests
211
The cause of the insurrection in Munster
213
The cause of the insurrection in Connaught
217
Further severities of the lords justices
220
The gentlemen of the pale petition the king and parlia ment
222
Barbarous orders of the lords justices and council to the earl of Ormond
225
Orders of the English parliament relative to Ireland
227
BOOK VI
229
174
232
The king consents to hear the grievances of the insur gents
233
Another contrivance of the justices to hinder the cessation
235
Sir William Parsons displaced from the government 239 IV Sir William Parsons displaced from the government V His majestys commissioners meet t...
241
The cessation at last concluded
243
The advantages of the cessation to his majestys army
246
The cessation violated by his majestys forces in Ulster 248 VIII The cessation violated by his majestys forces in Ulster IX The covenant brought into ...
250
The revolt of lord Inchiquin
253
The confederates send supplies to the king
255
The confederates press the marquis of Ormond to take the command of their forces
260
The king sends Ormond a commission to conclude a peace with the confederates
263
The treaty of peace adjourned
265
XV The earl of Clanrickard expostulates with Ormond upon his last answer to the confederates commissioners
268
CHÁY PAOLA
271
Glamorgan now freed from his confinement treats with
279
BOOK VII
288
IV Lord Digby arrives in Dublin and causes the peace with
296
The bad effects of the clergys proceedings 909
303
Dublin
313
Clanrickards engagement with Preston th Preston 918
320
Ormond delivers up the kings authority to the English
326
Reasons assigned for the marquis of Ormonds surrender
333
The Marquis of Ormond returns to Ireland
341
The happy effects of this peace Ormonds defeat at Rath
347
The marquis of Ormond desires leave to quit the kingdom
358
The duke of Ormonds design in permitting this meeting of the Irish clergy
419
The king confesses his obligation to make good the peace of the year 1648
421
Ormonds reasons for his opposition to the Irish considered
422
The earl of Orrery abuses the kings confidence with re spect to the settlement of Ireland
424
The affairs of Ireland brought before the English council
426
The sufferings of the Irish set forth by their agents before the king and council
428
A court of claims appointed in Ireland
432
The conditions of the innocency and nocency of the claim ants
435
The time limited for holding these courts found too short and not suffered to be enlarged
436
An enlary ement of time for hearing all the claimants by whom hindered
439
Some reflections on the foregoing acts
443
A dangerous conspiracy of the puritans
446
The duke of Ormond apologizes for the favour he had shewn to the Cromwellian party in Ireland
448
The probable motives of the duke of Ormonds past and present conduct with respect to the Irish
450
The duke of Ormond befriends the Irish
453
BOOK X
459
The same subject continued in general
461
Particular facts related in Archbishop Kings book proved false concerning popish judges and juries
462
The execution of captain Ashton
464
The affair of the quowarrantos against the corporations not truly stated by Dr King
465
VI The behaviour of the Irish priests and new recruits under King James impartially considered
469
The conduct of the Irish and English army compared
471
Irish rapparees
474
A conspiracy of the protestants of Dublin against the go vernment
478
The disarming of the protestants further considered
482
General De Rosens cruelty before Derry considered
483
King James countermands De Rosens order
487
FAP PAGE XIV King Williams treatment of the episcopal clergy in Scotland compared with King Jamess behaviour towards the protestant clergy in I...
494
The true cause of the decline of the protestant religion in Ireland in the reign of King James II
496
The perplexity of the established clergy of Ireland after the coronation of King William
498
The established clergy of Ireland laboured under a particu lar difficulty on this occasion
500
The good faith of King Williams and King Jamess officers compared
501
A short sketch of the cruelties inflicted on the Irish prisoners in this war and also on those even under protection
506
Surrender of Limerick with the articles of capitulation
509
Infringement of the articles of Limerick
526
Severe laws made against catholics
528
The catholics of Limerick cruelly treated
531
Penal laws to prevent the further growth of popery
533
Persecution of the catholics in the reign of Q Anne
541
Penal laws of discovery and gavel kind enacted
544
Reasons assigned for making those laws 546 VIII Reasons assigned for making those laws IX Persecution in the reign of King George 1
548
The catholics address his majesty King George II
551
Penal laws enforced in the reign of King George II
552
The conduct of the catholics of Ireland in the time of the rebellion in Scotland 1745
556
A bill for nuturalizing the Jews passes the house of commons
558
The catholics address the lord lientenant
560
humble remonstrance to be presented to his majesty
566
Tumults in Munster considered
568
The same subject continued
575
Some prospect of mitigating the rigour of the popery laws
579
APPENDIX No I A brief declaration of the governmenment of Irelandby captain Thomas Lee 1594
587
concerning the Irish parliament in 1613
609
To the kingThe faithful protestation of the Roman
644
XVI The several arguments of sir Theobad Butler counsellor
651
XVII The coronation oath of James II
660
412

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Página 21 - ... and if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time...
Página 18 - ... and images; nay even their transubstantiation. But while they acknowledge a foreign power, superior to the sovereignty of the kingdom, they cannot complain if the laws of that kingdom will not treat them upon the footing of good subjects.
Página 501 - Mount-Leinster, now belonging to the regiments in the aforesaid garrisons and quarters of the Irish army, who were beyond the seas, and sent thither upon affairs of their respective regiments, or the army in general, shall have the benefit and advantage of the second article, provided they return hither within the space of eight months from the date of these presents, and submit to their Majesties' government, and take the above-mentioned oath.
Página 500 - Mayo, or any of them ; and all the commissioned officers in their majesties' quarters that belong to the Irish regiments now in being, that are treated with, and who are not prisoners of war, or have taken protection, and who shall return and submit to their majesties...
Página 501 - ... provided also, that no person whatsoever shall have or enjoy the benefit of this article, that shall neglect or refuse to take the oath of allegiance,* made by act of parliament in England, in the first year of the reign of their present majesties, when thereunto required.
Página 500 - The Roman catholics of this kingdom shall enjoy such privileges in the exercise of their religion, as are consistent with the laws of Ireland, or as they did enjoy in the reign of king Charles II.; and their majesties, as soon as their affairs will permit them to summon a parliament in this kingdom, will endeavour to procure the said Roman catholics such further security in that particular, as may preserve them from any disturbance upon the account of their said religion.
Página 504 - ... should be inserted and be part of the said articles, which words having been casually omitted by the writer, the omission was not discovered till after the said articles were signed, but was taken notice of before the second town was surrendered ; and that our said Justices and...
Página 140 - Some time before the rebellion broke out,'x says Mr. Carte, " it was confidently reported, that sir John Clothworthy, who well knew the desigus of the faction that governed the house of commons in England, had declared there in a speech, that the conversion of the papists in Ireland, was only to be effected by the bible in one hand and the sword in the other; and Mr.
Página 504 - ... that our said Justices and General, or one of them, did promise that the said clause should be made good, it being within the intention of the capitulation and inserted in the foul...
Página 52 - This bred such comfort and security in the hearts of all men as thereupon ensued the calmest and most universal peace that ever was seen in Ireland.

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