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But cumming to her selfe she knew them, and said thus :
“ What, fryer Lawrence, is it you? where is my Romeus?”

that ere long, as I have been the cause, so shall I be the companion of your death: And, having with difficulty spoken these words, she fainted, and, again returning to life, busied herself in sad endeavours to gather with her sweet lips the extreme breath of her dearest lover, who now hastily approached his end.

“In this interval Friar Lorenzo had been informed how and when the damsel had drunk the potion, as also that upon a supposition of her death she had been buried; and, knowing that the time was now arrived when the powder should cease to operate, taking with him a trusty companion, about an hour before day he came to the vault; where being arrived, he heard the cries and lamentations of the lady, and, through a crevice in the cover, seeing a light within, he was greatly surprised, and imagined that, by some means or other, the damsel had contrived to convey with her à lamp into the tomb; and that now, having awaked, she wept and lamented, either through fear of the dead bodies by which she was surrounded, or perhaps from the apprehension of being for ever immured in this dismal place; and having, with the assistance of his companion, speedily opened the tomb, he beheld Julietta, who, with hair all disheveled, and sadly grieving, had raised herself so far as to be seated, and had taken into her lap her dying lover. To her he thus addressed himself: Did you then fear, O my daughter, that I should have left you to die here inclosed and she, seeing the friar, and redoubling her lamentations, answered: Far from it; my only fear is that you will drag me hence alive !-alas, for the love of God, away, and close the sepulcher, that I may here perish,--or rather reach me a knife, that piercing my breast, I may rid myself of my woes! O, my father, my father! is it thus you have sent me the letter? are these my hopes of happy marriage? is it thus you have conducted me to my Romeo? behold him here in my bosom already dead !-and, pointing to him, she recounted all that had passed. The friar, hearing these things, stood as one bereft of sense, and gazing upon the young man, then ready to pass from this into another life, bitterly weeping, he called to him, saying, 0, Romeo, what hard hap has torn you from me? speak to me at least! cast your eyes a moment upon me! Ó, Romeo, behold your dearest Julietta, who beseeches you to look at her. Why at the least will you not answer her in whose dear bosom you lie? At the beloved name of his mistress, Romeo raised a little his languid eyes, weighed down by the near approach of death, and, looking at her, reclosed them; and, immediately after, death thrilling through his whole frame, all convulsed, and heaving a short sigh, he expired.

* The miserable lover being now dead in the manner I have related, as the day was already approaching, after much lamentation the friar thus addressed the young damsel :-And you, Julietta, what do you mean to do?-to which she instantly replied,--here inclosed will I die. Say not so, daughter, said he; come forth from hence; for, though I know not well how to dispose of you, the means can not be wanting of shutting yourself up in some holy monastery, where you may continually offer your supplications to God, as well for yourself as for your deceased husband, if he should need your prayers. Father, replied the lady, one favour alone I entreat of you, which for the love you bear to the memory of him,--and so saying she pointed to Romeo,---you will willingly grant me, and that is, that you will never make known our death, that so our bodies may for ever remain united in this sepulcher: and if, by any accident, the manner of our dying should be discovered, by the love

VOL. XX.

And much amasde to see in tombe so great a light,
She wist not if she saw a dreame, or sprite that walkd by night..

conducts me to die in the midst of my enemies, of those by me slain, and in their sepulcher; but since, O my soul, thus near my love it delights us to die, here let us die! and, approaching to his lips the mortal draught, he received it entire into his bosom; when embracing the beloved maid, and strongly straining her to his breast, he cried, thou beauteous body, the utmost limit of all my desires, if after the soul is departed, any sentiment yet remains in you, or if that soul now beholds my cruel fate, let it not be displease ing to you, that, unable to live with you joyfully and openly, at the least I should die with you sadly and secretly;--and holding the body, straitly embraced, he awaited death.

“ The hour was now arrived, when by the natural heat of the damsel the cold and powerful effects of the powder should have been overcome, and when she should awake; and accordingly, embraced and violently agitated by Romeo, she awoke in his arms, and, starting into life, after a heavy sigh, she cried, Alas, where am I? who is it thus embraces me? by whom am I thus kissed ? and, believing it was the Frier Lorenzo; she exclaimed, Do you thus, Ofriar, keep your faith with Romeo? is it thus you safely conduct me to him ? Romeo, perceiving the lady to be alive, wondered exceedingly, and thinking perhaps on Pigmalion, he said, Do you not know me, O my sweet lady? see you not that I am your wretched spouse, secretly and alone come from Mantua to perish by you? Julietta, seeing herself in the monument, and perceiving that she was in the arms of one who called himself Romeo, was well nigh out of her senses, and pushing him a little from her, and gazing on his face, she instantly knew him, and embracing gave him a thousand kisses, saying, what folly has excited you, with such imminent danger, to enter here? Was it not sufficient to have understood by my letters how I had contrived, with the help of Friar Lorenzo, tó feign death, and that I should shortly have been with you? The unhappy youth, then perceiving his fatal mistake, thus began : 0 miserable lot! Ő wretched Romeo! o, by far the most afflicted of aŭl lovers ! On this subject never have I received your letters! and he then proceeded to inform her how Pietro had given him intelligence of her pretended death, as if it had been real, whence, believing her dead, he . had, in order to accompany her in death, even there close by her, taken the poison, which, as most subtile, he already felt, had sent forth death through all his limbs.

“ The unfortunate damsel hearing this, remained so overpowered with grief, that she could do nothing but tear her lovely locks, and beat and bruise her innocent breast; and at length to Romeo, who already lay supine, kissing him often, and pouring over him a flood of tears, more pale than ashes, and trem. bling all over, she thus spoke: Must you then, Ö lord of my heart, must you then die in my presence, and through my means! and will the heavens permit that I should survive you, though but for a moment? Wretched me! O, that I could at least transfer my life to you, and die alone!-to which, with a languid voice, the youth replied: If ever my faith and my love were dear to you, live, O my best hope! by these I conjure you, that after my death, life should not be displeasing to you, if for no other reason, at least that you may think on him, who, penetrated with passion, for your sake, and before your dear eyes now perishes! To this the damsel answered: If for my pretended death you now die, what ought I to do for yours which is real? It only grieves me that here in your presence, I have not the means of death, and, inasmuch as I survive you, I detest myself.! yet still will I hope

But cumming to her selfe she knew them, and said thus :
“ What, fryer Lawrence, is it you? where is my Romeus?”

that ere long, as I have been the cause, so shall I be the companion of your death: And, having with difficulty spoken these words, she fainted, and, again returning to life, busied herself in sad endeavours to gather with her sweet lips the extreme breath of her dearest lover, who now hastily approached his end.

“ In this interval Friar Lorenzo had been informed how and when the damsel had drunk the potion, as also that upon a supposition of her death she had been buried; and, knowing that the time was now arrived when the powder should cease to operate, taking with him a trusty companion, about an hour before day he came to the vault; where being arrived, he heard the cries and lamentations of the lady, and, through a crevice in the cover, seeing a light within, he was greatly surprised, and imagined that, by some means or other, the damsel had contrived to convey with her a lamp into the tomb; and that now, having awaked, she wept and lamented, either through fear of the dead bodies by which she was surrounded, or perhaps from the apprehension of being for ever immured in this dismal place; and having, with the assistance of his companion, speedily opened the tomb, he beheld Julietta, who, with hair all disheveled, and sadly grieving, had raised herself so far as to be seated, and had taken into her lap her dying lover. To her he thus addressed himself: Did you then fear, O my daughter, that I should have left you to die here inclosed? and she, seeing the friar, and redoubling her lamentations, answered: Far from it; my only fear is that you will drag me hence alive !-alas, for the love of God, away, and close the sepulcher, that I may here perish,---or rather reach me a knife, that piercing my breast, I may rid myself of my woes! O, my father, my father! is it thus you have sent mê the letter? are these my hopes of happy marriage? is it thus you have conducted me to my Romeo? behold him here in my bosom already dead !-and, pointing to him, she recounted all that had passed. The friar, hearing these things, stood as one bereft of sense, and gazing upon the young man, then ready to pass from this into another life, bitterly weeping, he called to him, saying, 0, Romeo, what hard hap has torn you from me? speak to me at least! cast your eyes a moment upon me! Ó, Romeo, behold your dearest Julietta, who beseeches you to look at her. Why at the least will you not answer her in whose dear bosom you lie? At the beloved name of his mistress, Romeo raised a little his languid eyes, weighed down by the near approach of death, and, looking at her, reclosed them; and, immediately after, death thrilling through his whole frame, all convulsed, and heaving a short sigh, he expired.

“ The miserable lover being now dead in the manner I have related, as the day was already approaching, after much lamentation the friar thus addressed the young damsel :-And you, Julietta, what do you mean to do?-to which she instantly replied, here inclosed will I die. Say not so, daughter, said he; come forth from hence; for, though I know not well how to dispose of you, the means can not be wanting of shutting yourself up in some holy monastery, where you may continually offer your supplications to God, as well for yourself as for your deceased husband, if he should need your prayers. Father, replied the lady, one favour alone I entreat of you, which for the love you bear to the memory of him,--and so saying she pointed to Romeo, you will willingly grant me, and that is, that you will never make known our death, that so our bodies may for ever remain united in this sepulcher : and if, by any accident, the manner of our dying should be discovered, by the love

VOL. XX.

And then the auncient frier, that greatly stoode in feare
Lest if they lingred ouer long they should be taken theare,
In few plaine woordes the whole that was betyde, he tolde,
And with his fingar shewd his corps out-stretched, stiffe, and

colde; And then perswaded her with pacience to abyde' This sodain great mischaunce; and sayth, that he will soone

prouyde In some religious house for her a quiet place, Where she may spend the rest of lyfe, and where in time percase She may with wisdomes meane measure her mourning brest, And vnto her tormented soule call back exiled rest. But loe, as soone as she had cast her ruthfull eye On Romeus face, that pale and wan fast by her side dyd lye, Straight way she dyd ynstop the conduites of her teares, And out they gushe ;-with cruell hand she tare her golden

heares. But when she neither could her swelling sorow swage, Ne yet her tender hart abyde her sicknes furious rage, Falne on his corps she lay long panting on his face, And then with all her force and strength the ded corps dyd em

brace,

As though with sighes, with sobs, with force, and busy payne,
She would him rayse, and him restore from death to lyfe agayne :
A thousand times she kist his mouth, as cold as stone, .
And it unkist agayne as oft; then gan she thus to mone:
“ Ah pleasant prop of all my thoughtes, ah onely ground
Of all the sweete delightes that yet in all my lyfe I found,

already mentioned I conjure you, that in both our names you would implore our miserable parents that they should make no difficulty of suffering those whom love has consumed in one fire, and conducted to one death, to remain in one and the same tomb ;-then turning to the prostrate body of Romeo, whose head she had placed on a pillow which had been left with her in the vault, having carefully closed his eyes, and bathing his cold visage with , tears,-lord of my heart, said she, without you what should I do with life? and what more remains to be done by me toward you but to follow you in death? certainly nothing more! in order that death itself, which alone could possibly have separated you from me, should not now be able to part us! and having thus spoken, reflecting upon the horrour of her destiny, and calling to mind the loss of her dear lover, determined no longer to live, she suppressed her respiration, and for a long space holding in her breath, at length sent it forth with a loud cry, and fell dead upon the dead body."

For the foregoing faithful and elegant translation, as well as that in a former page, I am indebted to a most dear and valued friend, whose knowledge of the Italian language is so much superior to any that I can pretend to, that I am confident.no reader will regret that the task has been executed by another.

1. MALONE.

Did such assured trust within thy hart repose,
That in this place and at this time, thy church-yarde thou hast

chose,

Betwixt the armes of me, thy perfect louing make,
And thus by meanes of me to ende thy lyfe, and for my sake?
Euen in the flowring of thy youth, when vnto thee
Thy lyfe most deare (as to the most) and pleasant ought to bee,
How could this tender corps withstand the cruell fight
Of furious death, that wonts to fray the stoutest with his sight?
How could thy dainty youth agree with willing hart
In this so fowle infected place (to dwell,) where now thou art?
Where spitefull Fortune hath appoynted thee to bee
The dainty foode of greedy woormes, vnworthy sure of thee.
Alas, alas, alas, what neded now anew
My wonted sorowes, doubled twise, agayne thus to renewe:
Which both the tyme and eke my pacient long abode
Should now at length have quenched quite, and vnder foote

haue trode?
Ah wretch and caytiue that I am, euen when I thought
To find my painefull passions salue, I myst the t ng I sought;
And to my mortall harme the fatall knyfe I grounde,
That gaue to me so deepe, so wyde, so cruell dedly wounde.
Ah thou, most fortunate and most vnhappy tombe!
For thou shalt beare, from age to age, witnes in time to comme
Of the most perfect league betwixt a payre of louers,
That were the most vnfortunate and fortunate of others ;
Receaue the latter sigh, receaue the latter pang,
Of the most cruell of cruell slaues that wrath and death ay

wrang." And when our Juliet would continue still her mone, The fryer and the seruant fled, and left her there alone; . For they a sodayne noyse fast by the place did heare, And lest they might be taken there, greatly they stoode in feare. When Juliet saw herselfe left in the vaulte alone, That freely she might worke her will, for let or stay was none, Then once for all she tooke the cause of all her harmes, The body dead of Romeus, and claspd it in her armes ; Then she with earnest kisse sụfficiently did proue, That more then by the feare of death, she was attaint by loue; And then, past deadly feare, for lyfe ne had she care With hasty hand she did draw out the dagger that he ware. “ O welcome death, (quoth she,) end of vnhappines, That also art begginning of assured happines, Feare not to darte me nowe, thy stripe no longer stay, Prolong no longer now my lyfe, I hate this long delaye ;

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