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Fen have the banner of the
The starry Flower of Liber
Mure Henelell Home

Flower of Libert

POEMS OF PATRIOTISM AND FREEDOM.

BREATHES THERE THE MAN

In the clear heaven of her delightful eye,
An angel-guard of love and graces lie ;
Around her knees domestic duties meet,
And fireside pleasures gambol at her feet.
“Where shall that land, that spot of earth be

found ?" Art thou a man? -- a patriot ?— look around; 0, thou shalt find, howe'er thy footsteps roam, That land thy country, and that spot thy home!

BREATHES there the man with soul so dead Who never to himself hath said,

This is my own, my native land ! Whose heart hath ne'er within him burned, As home his footsteps he hath turned

From wandering on a foreign strand ! If such there breathe, go, mark him well; For him no minstrel raptures swell ; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim, Despite those titles, power, and pelf, The wretch, concentred all in self, Living, shall forfeit fair renown; And, doubly dying, shall go down To the vile dust from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonored, and unsung.

Man, through all ages of revolving time,
Unchanging man,

in every varying clime, Deems his own land of every land the pride, Beloved by Heaven o'er all the world beside ; His home the spot of earth supremely blest, A dearer, sweeter spot than all the rest.

JAMES MONTGOMERY.

SIR WALTER SCOTT.

HOW SLEEP THE BRAVE

MY COUNTRY.

How sleep the brave, who sink to rest By all their country's wishes blessed ! When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod.

There is a land, of every land the pride,
Beloved by Heaven o'er all the world beside,
Where brighter suns dispense serener light,
And milder moons imparadise the night;
A land of beauty, virtue, valor, truth,
Time-tutored age, and love-exalted youth :
The wandering mariner, whose eye explores
The wealthiest isles, the most enchanting shores,
Views not a realm so bountiful and fair,
Nor breathes the spirit of a purer air.
In every clime, the magnet of his soul,
Touched by remembrance, trembles to that pole ;
For in this land of Heaven's peculiar race,
The heritage of nature's noblest grace,
There is a spot of earth supremely blest,
A dearer, sweeter spot than all the rest,
Where man, creation's tyrant, casts aside
His sword and sceptre, pageantry and pride,
While in his softened looks benignly blend
The sire, the son, the husband, brother, friend.
Here woman reigns; the mother, daughter, wife,
Strew with fresh flowers the narrow way of life :

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THE DEATH OF LEONIDAS.

But down swept all his power, with

with charge ; It was the wild midnight, - a storm was on the Down poured the arrows' shower, sky;

Spartan targe. The lightning gave its light, and the thunder Thus fought the Greek of old ! thus echoed by.

again! The torrent swept the glen, the ocean lashed the Shall not the selfsame mould bring shore ;

same men! Then rose the Spartan men, to make their bed in

G

gore !

PERICLES AND ASPA

Swift fro the deluged ground three hundred took

the shield ; Then, in silence, gathered round the leader of the

field ! All up the mountain's side, all down the woody

vale, All by the rolling tide waved the Persian banners

pale.

This was the ruler of the land

When Athens was the land o This was the light that led the

When each was like a living The centre of earth's noblest ri Of more than men the more tha

And foremost from the pass, among the slumber

ing band, Sprang King Leonidas, like the lightning's living

brand. Then double darkness fell, and the forest ceased

its moan ; But there came a clash of steel, and a distant dy

ing groan. Anon, a trumpet blew, and a fiery sheet burst high, That o'er the midnight threw a blood-red canopy.

Yet not by fetter, nor by spear,

His sovereignty was held ory Feared – but alone as freemen

Loved -- but as freemen love He waved the sceptre o'er his k By nature's first great title,

Resistless words were on his toi

Then eloquence first flashed ? Full armed to life the portent

Minerva from the thunderer:

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