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not rendered secure, and the tornado of last summer overturned and broke it. As a temporary substitute, the flag has been raised on a branch of the high tree on the Cape, but I hope in a few days to see a new staff erected. The delay hitherto has been caused by the difficulty of procuring suitable timber. The expenses of these repairs I intend to charge upon the Colonial treasury, and if it is found too poor, I trust your future legislation will replenish it by a more general tariff and heavier taxes. Indeed the time when the colonists should begin to support themselves, has arrived; and a new jail, court house, buildings for schools and public offices, they ought at once to erect at their own expense.

These constitute the main sources of expenditure hitherto; they are necessarily large, owing to the circumstance before alluded to; but there is one consideration, that they are only temporary, and may not occur again; at least not so many at the same moment. The final accounts relative to them, I have concluded to delay until the period of quarterly reports.

In relation to other transactions, the situation of the Eboes and Congoes early attracted my attention. They were in a state approaching to war, from disputes and jealousies relative to their officers. It was apprehended that I should find considerable difficulty in reconciling them again; however, by permitting each tribe to have a set of officers, as had been done always previously to the last election, all parties seemed satisfied. Concerning their location, I have had more perplexity. By a law made by Mr. Ashmun, they were to have been located three miles from any other settlement. Lott Carey placed them, or rather attempted to place them, immediately back of some lands given the colonists on Stockton, about half way. from Monrovia to Caldwell, hence called the “Half Way Farms," a location very inexpedient, both to the colonists and themselves; however, by mistake, they were actually placed upon lands belonging to individuals.By some neglect they have never been removed by my predecessor, and now it would be cruel and unjust to do so. They certainly are the most enterprising labourers in the Colony, and are making the most rapid advances of any. Last year they left their old town of thatch houses, and have laid out another near the river, containing many frame buildings; and not less than twenty such are now under way.

I could not reconcile it to my sense of duty, to leave them at the mercy of the colonists, on whose lands they had built, and some of whom were already boasting of their advantage; I have therefore determined to make exchanges, even at the expense of parting with town lots of considerable value. By this means, I hope to obtain lands there of sufficient extent to lay them out a town on the Stockton, that the experiment there may have a full trial. When informed of this plan, their joy seemed to know no bounds; and in their efforts to evidence it, by firing a great gun, three were very severely burned. The value of town lots and lands given in exchange for the farms, will be communicated at a future period.

The state of colonial surveys in general, and the disposition of lands, as in the preceding case, may evidence the great confusion that is likely to arise at a future period. At Millsburg, there is at present, no difficulty; and after visiting it, I have ordered deeds to be given to several individu- · als, whose improvements legally permitted it. At Edina, in Bassa, there is no difficulty as to the present surveys, except their paucity, compared with the number of farms wanted. But at Caldwell, and on the Cape, the confusion is complete. Neither the number nor location of a large part are known, even of town lots; and as to farms, the case is still worse. The confusion began in the loss of the copy and records (if any were ever made) of Mr. Ashmun's survey, and was continued by the death of Mr. Shepherd, and the consequent loss of his drafts, and since his time, by the

inattention or incompetence of his successors. I have ordered all who have claims for lots, to leave their names with the Register, and after proceeding to number anew the Caldwell lots and farms, shall assign every man his farm as soon as it can be surveyed. By this procedure, I hope that confusion may be avoided in future, and the excuse of having no farms, be heard no more from the careless and idle. A perfect remedy can be obtained only by employing and sending out a competent surveyor, to lay off the whole country. The plan of the United States' surveys in the western States would be of infinite service in this Colony, and save your Agent much trouble. I trust this subject will occupy a large share of the attention of the Board, and that, too, speedily.

Your Agent has left no means unemployed to excite, if possible, a spirit for agricultural improvement, and may hope not entirely without success. As an auxiliary to these efforts, and to ease the burthen of supporting many poor, whose labours, under proper directions, might support themselves, he has commenced a small farm near Caldwell; and nothing but the want of suitable implements, the poorest kind of which are with difficulty obtained, prevents rapid progress. To reap the full benefit of such a plan will require the erection of a Poor House. In it we could employ the numerous old women, widows, &c. who are now eating, from the Agency store, the bread of idleness. They might be employed in picking oakum, carding and spinning cotton, weaving and making up their own apparel. Thus the colonial largesses, instead of encouraging the idleness, would minister to the industry of the Colony. The importance of such a measure presses upon my mind with peculiar weight. The growth of the Colony will, yes, must be greatly retarded if it is neglected. Cotton might be abun. dantly raised on the farm, though perhaps two or three bales might be sent out profitably at first. Cards, I mean hand cards and wheels, must be supplied from America.

I do trust, that in this matter, the views of the Board may correspond with those just expressed, and that the succeeding Agent may be instructed and enabled to proceed to its accomplishment at once. This subject naturally introduces another, of which it is only a branch. I meau a general and complete code of laws. It is utterly impossible for one who has never had the experience, to imagine, much less realize the difficulties in our Courts.

The Colonial Laws do not touch on one point in a hundred which come before us, and the single direction to be guided by the common law of England and the United States, leads to endless difficulties. In relation to the estates of intestates, the rules of administrators, the courts of probate, the provision and government, &c. &c. of the poor, we are in utter onfusiwis. So also in relation to the port regulations, the tariff for the supply of the treasury, and many other points of vital importance to the interests of the Colony. On some of these points, with the advice of the Council, I have attempted some amendment, until a regular system of laws can be framed and sent out by the Board. They are drawn out in document (B). Connected with the subject also, is the erection of a light, perhaps a light house. Its importance on the coast is very great both to strangers and colonists, and all no doubt would cheerfully submit to pay a "Light duty”, to defray the expense. An ordinance has been passed, but its action is suspended for a time, till the light is or shall be erected. The old house for administering the laws, is now in a ruinous situation, and it is greatly to be hoped the people will unite their energies to build another and larger.

In order that no excuse may arise on the part of the colonists, by which to palliate neglect of duties clearly incumbent upon them, I have directed that all monies due the treasury be paid in money, and that no Agency orders or acceptances be received there; and have even proceeded to draw out the money of that kind now in the treasury, by taking up old acceptances paid out by the Treasurer on treasury drafis, and giving orders, which will become drafts on the Board at a future period.

If you will bear with me, I would offer a few remarks upon the mode of support at present allowed to Officers in the Colony. It appears to me a radical defert to allow any thing in addition to a stated and specific salary. Though delicacy might seem to urge my desisting, conscience will not permit me to be silent. The allowance of a support over and above the salary, has been, I verily believe, the prolific source of abuses and difficulties heretofore, and must continue to be while the system lasts. The Agent may. not have the inclination to check extravagance, either in himselt or others; but if the will exists, he is powerless as to the latter. The least interference will be construed into an infringement of privileges, and therefore he may be compelled to witness the most wasteful expenditure of monies, which, when their source is regarded, may be considered holy, and the act appear a sacrilege. These sentiments are not entirely new to me, but my brief experience has indelibly impressed them on my mind. I have been led to dwell on them by having experienced some of the unpleasant effects of such interference. Economy in expenditure is never so thoroughly practised, as when joined with personal interest, and it is notoriously the case, that men, unless guided by an uncommon sense of future accountability, will be more prodigal of expenditure when the payments come from public bodies, than if their own porkets were to be made to bear them. The Board cannot expert all of their Agents to be immaculate, and therefore, in my opinion, the economy of conducting their affairs demands that every officer have his certain fixed salary, and provide for himself. But independent of this, the consideration of difficulties 10 which Agents will be liable on the present plan, is sufficient, and every menuber of the Board would be convinced of it by one month's experience.

When Dr. Hall and the Baltimore expedition were here, application was made for permission to obtain some of the acclinated citizens of Liberia to assist them. I replied, that the people might go or stay, as they were freemen. Mr. McGill, the Vice-Agent, accompanied the expedition, as did also Mr. Thompson, the Book-keeper; the latter, I believe, intends to remain. Besides these, about twenty of the poorer class from this place, and some from Bassa, left us. The Rev. Mr. Wilson and Mr. Wyncoope, whom I presume you will see shortly, as they have engaged a passage home in the Jupiter, proceeded with Dr. Hall as far as Cape Palmas, and returned here in the Elgar. They report quite favorably of the place, and that Dr. Hall was completely successful in making a large purchase. There is not, so far as my iv formation extends, any considerable prepossession in this place towards the enterprise: most consider it too hazardous and uncertain to justify them in foregoing the certain advantages of their present situation. There is, however, to a considerable extent, a desire to settle both at Junk and Cape Mount. So importunate have been the solici ations in rea lation to the former place, and so favorable the disposition of the natives toward it, according to uniform report, that your Agent has felt it a duty to accede so far to the united desire, as to appoint Messrs. E. Johnson and H. Teage Commissioners to treat for the territory, and thus secure at this lavorable moment, a right, which, if not immediately beneficial, must be of great service eventually in the future operations of your Society, wbile it will secure an indisputable right of jurisdiction to the Colony and fully open an inland communication with Grand Bassa. They proceeded to the Junk according to their iustructions, and, after an absence of six days, returned, having met with complete success. A territory of pearly twenty miles square was obtained for nine hundred bars; by far the cheapest purchase ever made by your Society. The Kings have not yet come for their pay, but the deed is secured (C). The price was only 150 bars more than Mr. McGill paid for the Devil's Bush at Edina, containing not over ten acresthough that was considered cheap.

If circumstances favor, a similar title may be secured to the intermediate territories; i. e. Little Bassa and the country commencing immediately south of Cape Montserado and the Junk river.

The title secured to six acres of land at Bendoo, back of Cape Mount, from King Gray and others, is becoming quite a subject of dispute. For the purpose of allaying difficulties, I visited Cape Mount soon after my arrival, but had poor success in the object of the mission: as I found the very Kings whose names are signed to the deed obtained by Dr. Mechlin, disposed to deny the transaction and charge us with fraud.

I have firmly asserted our right and the determination of the Colony to enforce it if necessary, and thus the matter rests for the present. A healthier or a more delightful country could not be desired. The combined grandeur and beauty of the scenery from Bendoo is thrilling, and the passing visiter feels strongly urged to take up his abode on the borders of the beautiful Pissou. Bendoo is a high bluff at the emboucheur of Pissou ri. ver into the lake of the same name. It is the point of land between the river and lake, which was given to the Society. Before it, spreads out a lake of surpassing beauty, across which, to the side directly opposite, is a distance of 10 or 12 miles. Standing upon the bluff, the outline of the lake to its farthest extremity inland, and thence all around, can be more or less distinctly seen. Its interior, or south-eastern extremity, is an unbroken sheet of water, whose edges are covered with a rank luxuriant growth of vegetation, here and there interspersed with villages; this is on the left hand, as seen froin Bendoo. On the right and in front, westward, a multitude of little islands stud its mouth, as if to relieve the sudden boldness of Cape Mount, which completes the back ground, with an elevation of eight hundred or one thousand feet. The scene is one which painters would love to view. On the high bluff, with a fine lake and river abounding in fish, and securing a free circulation of air at all times, I cannot believe an infant settlement would have to endure half the difficulties from climate, which have been elsewhere encountered; at least, it is worth the trial.

Thus far in relation to pecuniary and political concerns. ' As to the internal police of the Colony, and the state of public offices, there seems even greater need of energetic action. The number of commonwealth cases has been truly alarming, bringing the treasury not less than three or four hundred dollars annually. To remedy this, I have reproved the officers, especially Justices of the Peace, many of whom were placed in commission by my predecessor, utterly ignorant of law, while old and experienced Justices were left out. I have been compelled to put some of the latter in commission. The neglect of several Committees, which receive vo pay for their services, was prominent and hurtful, especially the Committee of Agriculture. These have been directed to act efficiently, in seeing the roads cleared and various nuisances removed, but have hitherto done nothing. The report of this Committee I have called for, but have not yet obtained it.Its contents I can readily anticipate: and with the exception of gardens for families, twelve acres of coffee trees planted by Rev. C. M. Waring, I might venture the assertion, that pot fifty acres are cultivated in the Colony.

Inquiring for the causes of this destructive and humiliating neglect, sera eral were strikingly prominent. First and foremost, stands the fascination of trade: the colonist who shall resist this temptation will be an object of admiration. However, I hope this evil is on the point of curing itself, and

ders or acceptances be received there; and have even proceeded to draw out the money of that kind now in the treasury, by taking up old acceptances paid out by the Treasurer on treasury drafts, and giving orders, which will become drafts on the Board at a future period.

If you will bear with me, I would offer a few remarks upon the mode of support at present allowed to Officers in the Colony. It appears to me a radical defect to allow any thing in addition to a stated and specific salary. Though delicacy might seein to urge my desisting, conscience will not permit me to be silent. The allowance of a support over and above the salary, has been, I verily believe, the prolific source of abuses and difficulties heretofore, and must continue to be while the system lasts. The Agent may not have the inclination to check extravagance, either in himselt or others; but if the will exists, he is powerless as to the latter. The least interference will be construed into an infringement of privileges, and therefore he may be compelled to witness the most wastelul expenditure of movies, which, when their source is regarded, may be considered holy, and the act appear a sacrilege. These sentiments are not entirely new to me, but my brief experience has indelibly impressed them on my mind. I have been led to dwell on them by having experienced some of the unpleasant effects of such interference. Economy in expenditure is never so thoroughly practised, as when joined with personal interest, and it is notoriously the case, that men, unless guided by an uncommon sense of future accountability, will be more prodigal of expenditure when the payments come from public bodies, than if their own pockets were to be made to bear them. The Board camiot expert all of their Agents to be immaculate, and therefore, in my opinion, the economy of conducting their affairs demands thal every officer have his certain fixed salary, and provide for himself. But independent of this, the consideration of difficulties 10 which Agents will be liable on the present plan, is sufficient, and every menaber of the Board would be convinced of it by one month's experience.

When Dr. Hall and the Baltimore expedition were here, application was made for permission to obtain some of the acclinated citizens of Liberia'io assist them. I replied, that the people might go or stay, as they were freemen. Mr. McGill, the Vice-Agent, accompanied the expedition, as did also Mr. Thompson, the Book-keeper; the latter, I believe, intends to remain. Besides these, about twenty of the poorer class from this place, and some from Bassa, left us. The Rev. Mr. Wilson and Mr. Wyncoope, whom I presume you will see shortly, as they have engaged a passage home in the Jupiter, proceeded with Dr. Hall as far as Cape Palmas, and returned here in the Elgar. They report quite favorably of the place, and that Dr. Hall was completely successful in making a large purchase. There is not, so far as my information extends, any considerable prepossession in this place towards the enterprise: most consider it too hazardous and uncertain to justify thein in foregoing the certain advantages of their present sillation. There is, however, to a considerable extent, a desire to settle both at Junk and Cape Mount. So importunate have been the solici ations in relation to the former place, and so favorable the disposition of the natives toward it, according to uniform report, that your Agent has felt it a duty to arcede so far to the united desire, as to appoint Messrs. E. Johnson and H. Teage Commissioners to treat for the territory, and thus secure at this lavorable moment, a right, which, if not immediately beneficial, must be of great service eventually in the future operations of your Society, while it will secure an indisputable right of jurisdiction to the Colony and fully open an inland communication with Grand Bassa. They proceeded to the Junk according to their iustructions, and, after an absence of six days, returned, having met with complete success. A territory of pearly twenty miles

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