Metamorphoses

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Wordsworth Editions, 1998 - 520 páginas
The Roman poet Ovid's Metamorphoses, completed around 8AD, shows the presence and prevalence of change in the world. Beginning with chaos and creation, Ovid embraces a vast array of mythological tales within his theme of transformation.
 

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INTRODUCTION by Garth Tissol
xi
A PREFACE IN BEHALF OF THE TRANSLATORS
xxv
BOOK THE FIRST by Mr Dryden
3
BOOK THE SECOND by Mr Addison
37
The Story of Alcithöe and her Sisters by Mr Eusden
99
The Story of Leucothöe and the Sun by the same hand
106
Alcithöe and her Sisters transformd to Batts
115
The Transformation of the Theban Matrons
121
BOOK THE SIXTH by Mr Croxall
167
The Story of Medea and Jason by Mr Tate
203
Old Aeson restord to Youth by the same hand
209
The Death of Pelias by the same hand
215
The Story of Ants changd to Men by Mr Stonestreet
225
The Story of Cephalus and Procris by Mr Tate
231
The Story of Nisus and Scylla by Mr Croxall
241
The Labyrinth by the same hand
247

The Story of Medusas Head by the same hand
130

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Sobre o autor (1998)

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC--AD 17/18), known as Ovid. Born of an equestrian family in Sulmo, Ovid was educated in rhetoric in Rome but gave it up for poetry. He counted Horace and Propertius among his friends and wrote an elegy on the death of Tibullus. He became the leading poet of Rome but was banished in 8 A.D. by an edict of Augustus to remote Tomis on the Black Sea because of a poem and an indiscretion. Miserable in provincial exile, he died there ten years later. His brilliant, witty, fertile elegiac poems include Amores (Loves), Heroides (Heroines), and Ars Amatoris (The Art of Love), but he is perhaps best known for the Metamorphoses, a marvelously imaginative compendium of Greek mythology where every story alludes to a change in shape. Ovid was admired and imitated throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Jonson knew his works well. His mastery of form, gift for narration, and amusing urbanity are irresistible.

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