Occasional, Critical, and Political Writing

Capa
Oxford University Press, 2000 - 360 páginas
"James Joyce's non-fictional writings address diverse issues: aesthetics, the functions of the press, censorship, Irish cultural history, England's literature and empire. This collection includes newspaper articles, reviews, lectures, and propagandizing essays that are consciously public, direct, and communicative. It covers forty years of Joyce's life and maps important changes in his opinions about politics, especially Irish politics, about the relationship of literature to history, and about writers who remained important to him such as Mangan, Blake, Defoe, Ibsen, Wilde, and Shaw." "These pieces also clarify and illuminate the transformations in Joyce's fiction from Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man to the first drafts of Ulysses. Gathering together more than fifty essays, several of which have never been available in an English edition, this volume is the most complete and the most helpfully annotated collection." --Book Jacket.
 

Conteúdo

Introduction
ix
Translators Introduction
xxxiii
A Chronology of James Joyce
xliii
Trust Not Appearances
3
The Study of Languages
12
Drama and Life
23
Ibsens New Drama
30
The Day of the Rabblement
50
James Clarence Mangan 1907
125
The Irish Literary Renaissance
137
Ireland at the
145
The Centenary of Charles Dickens
183
The Shade of Parnell
191
Italian Memories in an Irish Port
197
Politics and Cattle Disease
206
From a Banned Writer to a Banned Singer
212

An Irish Poet
61
A Suave Philosophy
67
The Soul of Ireland
74
Aristotle on Education
80
Unequal Verse
87
The Bruno Philosophy
93
Borlase and
99
Island of Saints and Sages
108
Explanatory Notes
289
95
302
97
308
127
320
The
327
Index
349
Realism and Idealism in English Literature Daniel
353
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Sobre o autor (2000)

James Joyce was born on February 2, 1882, in Dublin, Ireland, into a large Catholic family. Joyce was a very good pupil, studying poetics, languages, and philosophy at Clongowes Wood College, Belvedere College, and the Royal University in Dublin. Joyce taught school in Dalkey, Ireland, before marrying in 1904. Joyce lived in Zurich and Triest, teaching languages at Berlitz schools, and then settled in Paris in 1920 where he figured prominently in the Parisian literary scene, as witnessed by Ernest Hemingway's A Moveable Feast. Joyce's collection of fine short stories, Dubliners, was published in 1914, to critical acclaim. Joyce's major works include A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, Finnegans Wake, and Stephen Hero. Ulysses, published in 1922, is considered one of the greatest English novels of the 20th century. The book simply chronicles one day in the fictional life of Leopold Bloom, but it introduces stream of consciousness as a literary method and broaches many subjects controversial to its day. As avant-garde as Ulysses was, Finnegans Wake is even more challenging to the reader as an important modernist work. Joyce died just two years after its publication, in 1941. Kevin Barry was born in 1969 in Ireland. He is the author of two collections of short stories and the novel City of Bohane. He started out as a frelance journalist writing a column for the Irish Examiner. He soon focused all of his time on writing. In 2007 he won the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature for his short story collection There are Little Kingdoms. In 2011 he released his debut novel City of Bohane, which was followed in 2012 by the short story collection Dark Lies the Island. Barry won the International Dublin Literary Award for his novel City of Bohane in 2013. He also won the Goldsmiths Prize 2015 with his title Beatlebone.

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