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By 2011N ASH, LL. D.

AUTHOR OF GRAMMATICAL INSTI

S; OR, AN EASY IRTROCUCTION TO
DR. LOWTH'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR.

THE SECOND EDITION.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

30253.e.l

LONDON:
PRINTED FOR VERNOR AND HOOD, BIRCHIN LANE, CORNHILL.

1795.

THE ABBREVIATIONS EXPLAINED.

Eld.

Floy.

A. Ar. Arts.

Active. Ad. Addi. Addison.

Adjective. adv.

Adverb,
Ai. Ain. Ains. Ainsworth.
Ajo. Apocry. Apocrypha.
Arab,

Arabic. Arb. Arbuth. Arbuthnot. art.

Article. Ayl. Aylitte. B. Ba. Bai. Bailey. Bar.

Paruch. Blacks. Black stone. Boy.

Boyle. Br.

Brown. C. Ch. Chauc, Chaucer. Camd.

Camden. Cant.

Canticles. Clar, Clarend. Clarendon. Co.

Cole. Col.

Colossians. сопр. . Comparative. ceny.

Conjunction. Cor.

Corinthians.

Davies. D.

Dictionary. D.in.

Daniel. Deut.

Deuteronomy. Dici. Dictionary Dia. Ruft.

Ruiticum. Dis.

Digby. Dr.

Doctor. Dr. Dryd.

Dryden. Eccle.

Ecclefiafics. Eph. Ephesians.

Esdras. Exod. Exodus.

Ezra. Ezek.

Ezekiel.
Falco.

Falconer.
Floyer.

French.
Gen.

Genesis. Hinm.

Hanmer. Har. Horv. Harvey. Hiy. Hay-w.

Hayward. Heb.

Hebrew. Hook.

Hooker. Hu. Hudi. Hudibras.

S John,

2 Johnson. fer. Jere.

Jeremiahı. int.

Intranfitive. interj. Interjection. Jo. John. Johns

Johnson Jl. Joihua. 11. Ijai.

llaiah. Jud. Judges. Kn.

Knowls. L.

Lidy. L. Lat. Laria. L E/tran. L Estrange Levit.

Leviticus. Loc.

Locke. Mac. Maccab. Maccabees. Mand.

Mandeville. M...

Martiew. Mo. Morti, Niortimer. Mic.

Micah.
Mil.

Milton,
Neuter.

Nik.

Nehemiah.
Nu. Num. Numbers.
P. Ph. Phil. Phillips.
p.

Participle.
Panth,

Pantheon.
Pli.

Pliny. plu.

Plural.
Po.

Pope.
Pr.

Prior. prepor: Preposition. prono.

Pronoun.
Rev.

Revelations.
Ro. Rom. Romans.
S. Sc.

Scott.

Sustantive.
S21.

Samuel.
Sax.

Saxon.
Sh. Shakes. Shakespear.
Shar.

Sharp.
Sil.

Sidney.
Sp. Spenf. Spenser.
Spetia.

Spectator.
Stat.

Statute. jup.

Superlative.

Transitive.
Teut.

Teutonic.
Tromf. Thomson.
Thucyd.

Thucydides.
Tob.

Tobit.

Verb.
Tir.

Virgil.
IP..

Walton.
11:1.

Wallace.
Ii. Hick!. Wickliffe.
Wilk.

Wilkinson.
Waal,

Wooiward. Zech.

Zechariah.

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N. B. The accent is so placed, for the most part, as to terminate the syllable and aid the pronunciation :

For Example. Acre . A-cre. | Acrid . Ac-rid. 1 Ta'ble Ta-ble. | Tablet .. Tab-let.

A D V E R T IS E MEN T.

T

THE plan of this work is exten ave beyond any thing that has yet been attempted of the kind in the English Language. It was intended

to introduce not only all the appellatives of common words, whether ndical, derivative or compound, obsolete, cant or provincial; but all proper limes of men and women, heathen gods and goddefies, heroes, princes, poets, bifosians, wife men and philosophers of special note, whether ancient nr modern: Of all the principal kingdoms, cities, towns, feas and rivers in the known world, more especially in Great Britain and Ireland : Of beasts, birds, fishes and infeas: Of trees, plants, herbs, minerals and foffils. The terms of art in chymitry, pharmacy, heraldry, divinity, mathematics, mechanics, manufactures and busbandry. The derivations from the ancient, modern and learned languages, in which special attention has been given to the mere English scholar, by a proper analylis and full explanation of the originals. The various fenfes, with the use and conftru&ion illustrated by examples, and fupported by authorities where any thing appeared to be uncommon or doubtful. The pronunciation pointed out, and affifted by a new method of placing the accent, and by notes on the founds of the letters where it was judged necessary. The different spellings preferved and distinguished as ancient or modern, common or uncommon, correct of incorrect : and, in a word, every thing which might be thought requisite to render the work worthy of the title it bears, and under which it is now recommended to the public. And all this to be comprised in as narrow a compass as poffable, left the size should fupersede che intention of general usefulness, and acceptance to the English reader.

The execution of a plan fo very extensive, and yet in some respects limited, mut doubtless have failed in fome particulars. Errata of the press and other trilling defects, in a work of this nature, could not be avoided. The compounds and transmutations of the English Language are exceedingly numerous; almot any adjective, by an ellipfis, is converted into a subflantive, and almost any fubftantive, by á kind of composition, is transformed into an adjektive. All which compounds and transmutations could not well be collected : they have been and are fill fabricated by the caprice or different cast of the writers who use them ; and are, perhaps, capable of an endless variety. The obsolete {pellings from Chaucer, and other cotemporary authors, might have been greatly increased, but those which are here introduced, may be thought, perhaps, more than sufficient to illustrate the orthography of that period, Nor was it thought necessary or expedient to rake into the mere cant of any profession, much less of gameters, highwaymen, pickpockets and giphes.

The final k, after c, in words derived from the learned languages, though carefully retained by Johnson and other writers, has been omitted, in conformity to modern custom and the originals. For it seems to me to be rather incongruous to write mufick from mufica, especially as the k has been exploded by general consent from the derivatives mufcian and musical. The use of the hyphen in compound words has, of late, been much discontinued. It has 20 awkward appearance in many instances, and is therefore generally omitted

The derivations, for the most part, have been illustrated from the roots of the originals, though the words to be explained might in fomc few instances be more nearly allled to the offspring. For example, when a word comes imme

A 2

diately

in this compilation.

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