The works of Samuel Johnson [ed. by F.P. Walesby].

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W. Pickering, London; and Talboys and Wheeler, Oxford, 1825
 

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Seite 233 - That they are entitled to life, liberty, and property, and they have never ceded to any sovereign power whatever, a right to dispose of either without their consent.
Seite 234 - That by such emigration they by no means forfeited, surrendered, or lost any of those rights, but that they were, and their descendants now are, entitled to the exercise and enjoyment of all such of them, as their local and other circumstances enable them to exercise and enjoy.
Seite 493 - ... or sepulchre. Nor is this much to believe; as we have reason, we owe this faith unto history; they only had the advantage of a bold and noble faith, who lived before his coming, who upon obscure prophecies and mystical types could raise a belief, and expect apparent impossibilities.
Seite 256 - If slavery be thus fatally contagious, how is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?
Seite 235 - But, from the necessity of the case, and a regard to the mutual interest of both countries, we cheerfully consent to the operation of such acts of the British parliament, as are bona fide, restrained to the regulation of our external commerce, for the purpose of securing the commercial advantages of the whole empire to the mother country, and the commercial benefits of its respective members ; excluding every idea of taxation internal or external, for raising a revenue on the subjects in America,...
Seite 489 - He fell into an age in which our language began to lose the stability which it had obtained in the time of Elizabeth ; and was considered by every writer as a subject on which he might try his plastic skill, by moulding it according to his own fancy. Milton, in consequence of this...
Seite 191 - Qu'on parle mal ou bien du fameux Cardinal, Ma prose ni mes vers n'en diront jamais rien : II m'a fait trop de bien pour en dire du mal, II m'a fait trop de mal pour en dire du bien.
Seite 475 - God hath necessitated their contentment : but the superior ingredient and obscured part of ourselves, whereto all present felicities afford no resting contentment, will be able at last to tell us, we are more than our present selves, and evacuate such hopes in the fruition of their own accomplishments.
Seite 194 - These are the men who, without virtue, labour, or hazard, are growing rich as their country is impoverished; they rejoice when obstinacy or ambition adds another year to slaughter and devastation ; and laugh from their desks at bravery and science, while they are adding figure to figure, and cipher to cipher, hoping for a new contract from a new armament, and computing the profits of a siege or tempest.
Seite 469 - There are many things delivered rhetorically, many expressions therein merely tropical, and as they best illustrate my intention ; and therefore also there are many things to be taken in a soft and flexible sense, and not to be called unto the rigid test of reason.

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