The British Angler's Manual, Or, The Art of Angling in England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland: With Some Account of the Principal Rivers, Lakes, and Trout Streams, in the United Kingdom : with Instructions in Fly-fishing, Trolling, and Angling at the Bottom, and More Particularly for the Trout

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Whitehead and Compy. ... and R. Ackermann, 1839 - 410 páginas
 

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Página 319 - But if the breathless chase o'er hill and dale Exceed your strength ; a sport of less fatigue, Not less delightful, the prolific stream Affords. The crystal rivulet, that o'er A stony channel rolls its rapid maze, Swarms with the silver fry.
Página 76 - ... tail ; and then tie the hook and his tail about, very neatly, with a white thread, which will make it the apter to turn quick in the water: that done, pull back that part of your line which was slack when you did put your hook into the minnow the second time ; I say, pull that part of your line back, so that it shall fasten the head, so that the body of the minnow shall be almost straight on your hook : this done, try how it will turn, by drawing it...
Página 89 - He rolls and wreathes his shining body round ; Then headlong shoots beneath the dashing tide, The trembling fins the boiling wave divide. Now hope exalts the fisher's beating heart, « Now he turns pale, and fears his dubious art ; He views the tumbling fish with longing eyes, While the line stretches with th...
Página 274 - ... stood fishing when alarmed. Then our path lay along the margin of the lake, and then through a shady lane which opened into a farm-yard. We came now near the bridge, and were soon to be satisfied how a lake could be crossed by a bridge. In one spot, about halfway along the lake, — which is about two miles and a half in length, and from a quarter to half a mile in breadth, — the shores throw out promontories which leave no very wide space from point to point ; and here there is a rising of...
Página xiv - Which o'er the stream a waving forest throw, When if an insect fall, (his certain guide) He gently takes him from the whirling tide, Examines well his form with curious eyes, His gaudy vest, his wings, his horns...
Página xiv - Oft have I seen a skilful angler try The various colours of the treacherous fly ; When he with fruitless pain hath skiinra'd the brook, And the coy fish rejects the skipping hook, He shakes the boughs that on the margin grow, Which o'er the stream a waving forest throw, When if an insect fall, (his certain guide) He gently takes him from the whirling tide, Examines well his form with curious eyes, His gaudy vest...
Página xi - My next and last example shall be that undervaluer of money, the late provost of Eton College, Sir Henry Wotton, a man with whom I have often fished and conversed, a man whose foreign employThe First Day 41 ments in the service of this nation, and whose experience, learning, wit, and cheerfulness, made his company to be esteemed one of the delights of mankind.
Página 252 - Behind, and strikes them from the book of life. /Now swarms the village o'er the jovial mead : The rustic youth, brown with meridian toil, Healthful and strong ; full as the summer-rose Blown by prevailing suns, the ruddy maid, Half naked, swelling on the sight, and all Her kindled graces burning o'er her cheek.
Página 303 - ... along, but never slowly ; in others, its motion is rapid, impetuous, and even turbulent. The ash, the hazel, the slender osier, and the graceful birch, hung with honeysuckles and wild roses, dip their pensile branches in the stream, and break its surface into beauteous ripples. Huge fragments of stone, toppled from the rocks above, and partly covered with moss and plants that haunt and love the water, divide the stream into many currents ; round these it...
Página 108 - Goritzia — and in the streams which gush forth from the limestone caverns of the Noric Alps. Besides temperature, grayling require a peculiar character in the disposition of the water of rivers. They do not dwell, like trout, in rapid shallow torrents ; nor, like char, or chub, in deep pools or lakes. They require a combination of stream and pool ; they like a deep, still pool, for rest, and a rapid stream above, and a gradually declining shallow below, and a bottom, where marl or loam is mixed...

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