Selections in English Prose from Elizabeth to Victoria (1580-1880).

Capa
James Mercer Garnett
Ginn, 1890 - 701 páginas
 

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Página 133 - Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties.
Página 141 - For the time is come that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if it first begin at us, what shall the end be of them that obey not the gospel of God?
Página 124 - Christ was the word that spake it; He took the bread and brake it; And what the word did make it, That I believe, and take it.
Página 241 - He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul, All the images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too.
Página 504 - Piece out our imperfections with your thoughts ; Into a thousand parts divide one man, And make imaginary puissance ; Think, when we talk of horses, that you see them Printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth : — For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings; Carry them here and there ; jumping o'er times, Turning the accomplishment of many years Into an hour-glass...
Página 454 - There is, however, a circumstance attending these colonies, which, in my opinion, fully counterbalances this difference, and makes the spirit of liberty still more high and haughty than in those to the northward. It is that in Virginia and the Carolinas they have a vast multitude o'f slaves. Where this is the case in any part of the world, those who are free, are by far the most proud and jealous of their freedom. Freedom is to them not only an enjoyment, but a kind of rank and privilege.
Página 169 - Time which antiquates antiquities, and hath an art to make dust of all things, hath yet spared these minor monuments. In vain we hope to be known by open and visible conservatories, when to be unknown was the means of their continuation, and obscurity their protection.
Página 359 - I will say of the Lord, he is my refuge and my fortress, my God, in him will I trust Surely he shall deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, and from the noisome pestilence...
Página 128 - Lords and Commons of England, consider what nation it is whereof ye are and whereof ye are the governors : a nation not slow and dull, but of a quick, ingenious, and piercing spirit, acute to invent, subtle and sinewy to discourse, not beneath the reach of any point the highest that human capacity can soar to.
Página 546 - It is but lost labour that ye haste to rise up early, and so late take rest, and eat the bread of carefulness : for so he giveth his beloved sleep.

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