Nature, Addresses and Lectures

Capa
The Minerva Group, Inc., 2001 - 376 páginas
Nature, Addresses and Lectures contains nine chapters on nature, the American scholar, addresses, literary ethics, the method of nature, man the reformer, lecture of the times, the conservative, the transcendentalist and the young American.

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NATURE
13
THE AMERICAN SCHOLAR
81
AN ADDRESS
117
LITERARY ETHICS
149
THE METHOD OF NATURE
181
MAN THE REFORMER
215
LECTURE ON THE TIMES
245
THE CONSERVATIVE
277
THE TRANSCENDENTALIST
309
THE YOUNG AMERICAN
341
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Página 7 - A SUBTLE chain of countless rings The next unto the farthest brings ; The eye reads omens where it goes, And speaks all languages the rose ; And, striving to be man, the worm Mounts through all the spires of form INTRODUCTION.

Sobre o autor (2001)

Known primarily as the leader of the philosophical movement transcendentalism, which stresses the ties of humans to nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson, American poet and essayist, was born in Boston in 1803. From a long line of religious leaders, Emerson became the minister of the Second Church (Unitarian) in 1829. He left the church in 1832 because of profound differences in interpretation and doubts about church doctrine. He visited England and met with British writers and philosophers. It was during this first excursion abroad that Emerson formulated his ideas for Self-Reliance. He returned to the United States in 1833 and settled in Concord, Massachusetts. He began lecturing in Boston. His first book, Nature (1836), published anonymously, detailed his belief and has come to be regarded as his most significant original work on the essence of his philosophy of transcendentalism. The first volume of Essays (1841) contained some of Emerson's most popular works, including the renowned Self-Reliance. Emerson befriended and influenced a number of American authors including Henry David Thoreau. It was Emerson's practice of keeping a journal that inspired Thoreau to do the same and set the stage for Thoreau's experiences at Walden Pond. Emerson married twice (his first wife Ellen died in 1831 of tuberculosis) and had four children (two boys and two girls) with his second wife, Lydia. His first born, Waldo, died at age six. Emerson died in Concord on April 27, 1882 at the age of 78 due to pneumonia and is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord, Massachusetts.

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