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ESSAYS

OF

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON THE BIOGRAPHICAL EDITION

OF STEVENSON’S WORKS

NOVELS AND ROMANCES
TREASURE ISLAND
PRINCE OTTO
KIDNAPPED
THE BLACK ARROW
THE MASTER OF BALLANTRAE
THE WRONG BOX
THE WRECKER
DAVID BALFOUR
THE EBB-TIDE
WEIR OF HERMISTON
ST. IVES

SHORTER STORIES
NEW ARABIAN NIGHTS
THE DYNAMITER
THE MERRY MEN, containing DR. JEKYLL

AND MR. HYDE
ISLAND NIGHTS' ENTERTAINMENTS

ESSAYS, TRAVELS & SKETCHES
AN INLAND VOYAGE
TRAVELS WITH A DONKEY
VIRGINIBUS PUERISQUE
FAMILIAR STUDIES
THE AMATEUR EMIGRANT, containing THE

SILVERADO SQUATTERS
MEMORIES AND PORTRAITS
IN THE SOUTH SEAS
ACROSS THE PLAINS
ESSAYS OF TRAVEL AND IN THE ART OF

WRITING
LAY MORALS AND OTHER PAPERS

POEMS
COMPLETE POEMS

THE LETTERS OF ROBERT LOUIS

STEVENSON. 4 vols. THE LIFE OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON By Graham Balfour. Abridged Edition in one volume

Thirty-one volumes. Sold singly or in sets Per volume, Cloth, $1.00; Limp Leather, $1.25 net CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS, NEW YORK

ESSAYS

OF

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SELECTED AND EDITED
WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES

BY

WILLIAM LYON PHELPS

M.A. (HARVARD) PH.D. (YALE)

FORMERLY INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH AT HARVARD
LAMPSON PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH LITERATURE AT YALE

NEW YORK
CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS

Copyright, 1892, 1906, by
CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS

Library
w. B. Hinsdale

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10-7-44

PREFACE

Ol!-!-H4 6. P.

THE text of the following essays is taken from the Thistle Edition of Stevenson's Works, published by Charles Scribner's Sons, in New York. I have refrained from selecting any of Stevenson's formal essays in literary criticism, and have chosen only those that, while ranking among his masterpieces in style, reveal his personality, character, opinions, philosophy, and faith. In the Introduction, I have endeavoured to be as brief as possible, merely giving a sketch of his life, and indicating some of the more notable sides of his literary achievement; pointing out also the literary school to which these Essays belong. A lengthy critical Introduction to a book of this kind would be an impertinence to the general reader, and a nuisance to a teacher. In the Notes, I have aimed at simple explanation and some extended literary comment. It is hoped that the general recognition of Stevenson as an English classic may make this volume useful in school and college courses, while it is not too much like a textbook to repel the average reader. I am indebted to Professor Catterall of Cornell and to Professor Cross of Yale, and to my brother the Rev. Dryden W. Phelps, for some assistance in locating references.

W. L. P.

YALE UNIVERSITY, 13 February 1906.

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