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to unearned freights, gross freights, prospective profits, freights, gains, or advantages, or for wages of officers or seamen for a longer time than one year next after the breaking up of a voyage by the acts aforesaid. And no claim shall be admissible or allowed by said court by or in behalf of any insurance company or insurer, either in its or his own right, or as assignee, or otherwise, in the right of a person or party insured as aforesaid, unless such claimant shall show, to the satisfaction of said court, that during the late rebellion the sum of its or his losses, in respect to its or his war risks, exceeded the sum of its or his premiums or other gains upon or in respect to such war risks ; and in case of any such allowance, the same shall not be greater than such excess of loss. And no claim shall be admissible or allowed by said court arising in favor of any insurance company not lawfully existing at the time of the loss under the laws of some one of the United States. And no claim shall be admissible or allowed by said court arising in favor of any person not entitled at the time of his loss to the protection of the United States in the premises, nor arising in favor of any person who did not at all times during the late rebellion bear true allegiance to the United States.

Provision is made for retaining in the Treasury, as a special fund, subject to future action, the amount which may be undisposed of under this act. And if the sum of all the judgments rendered by the court, together with interest, should exceed the amount of the award, provision is made for ratable reductions of the judgment claims.

THE SAN JUAN BOUNDARY AWARD.

We, William, by the grace of God, German Emperor, King of Prussia, etc., etc., etc.,

After examination of the treaty concluded at Washington on the 6th of May, 1871, between the governments of Her Britannic Majesty and of the United States of America, according to which the said governments have submitted to our arbitrament the question at issue between them, whether the boundary line which, according to the treaty of Washington of June 15, 1846, after being carried westward along the forty-ninth parallel of northern latitude to the middle of the channel which separates the continent from Vancouver's Island is thence to be drawn southerly through the middle of the said channel and of the Fuca Straits to the Pacific Ocean, should be drawn through the Rosario Channel, as the Government of Her Britannic Majesty claims, or through the Haro Channel, as the Government of the United States claims; to the end that we may finally and without appeal decide which of these claims is most in accordance with the true interpretation of the treaty of June 15, 1846.

After hearing the report made to us by the experts and jurists upon the contents of the interchanged memorials and their appendices,

Have decreed the following award:

Most in accordance with the true interpretations of the treaty concluded on the 15th of June, 1846, between the governments of Her Britannic Majesty and of the United States of America, is the claim of the Government of the United States that the boundary line between the territories of Her Britannic Majesty and the United States should be drawn through the Haro Channel.

Authenticated by our autographic signature and the impression of the imperial green seal.

Given at Berlin, October the 21st, 1872. [L. s]

WILLIAM.

POLAND'S GAG LAW.

An Act conferring jurisdiction upon the criminal court of the

District of Columbia, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the criminal court of the District of Columbia shall have jurisdiction of all crimes and misdemeanors committed in said District, not lawfully triable in any other court, and which are required by law to be prosecuted by indictment or information.

Sec. 2. That the provisions of the thirty-third section of the judiciary act of seventeen hundred and eighty-nine shall apply to courts created by act of Congress in the District of Columbia.

Approved, June 22, 1874.

CIVIL RIGHTS BILL OF 1875.

SECTION 1. That all the persons within the jurisdiction of the United States shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of the accommodations, advantages, facilities, and privileges of insurances, public conveyances on land and water, theatres, and other places of public amusement, subject only to the conditions and limitations established by law, and applicable alike to the citizens of every race and color, regardless of any previous condition of servitude.

SEC. 2. That any person who shall violate the foregoing section by denying to any citizen, except for reasons by law applicable to the citizens of every race and color, and regardless of any previous condition of servitude, the full enjoyment of any of the accommodations, advantages, facilities, or privileges in said section enumerated, or by aiding or inciting, shall for every such offense forfeit and pay the sum of five hundred dollars to the person aggrieved thereby, to be recovered in an action of debt, with full costs, and shall also, for every such offense, be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof be fined not less than five hundred nor more than one thousand dollars, or shall be imprisoned not less than thirty days nor more than one year; provided that all persons may elect to sue for the penalty aforesaid, or to proceed under their rights at common law and by State statutes, and having so elected to proceed in the one mode or the other: their right to proceed in the other jurisdiction shall be barred; but this proviso shall not apply to criminal proceedings either under this act or the criminal law of any State: and provided further that the judgment for the penalty in favor of the party aggrieved, or a judgment upon an indictment, shall be a bar to either prosecution respectively.

Sec. 3. That the District and Circuit Courts of the United States shall have, exclusively of the courts of the several Stales, cognizance of all the crimes and offenses against and violations of the provisions of this act, and actions for the penalty given by the preceding section, may be prosecuted in a Territorial district or circuit court of the United States wherever the dependent may be found, without regard to the other party; and the district attorneys, marshals, and deputy marshals of the United States, and commissioners appointed by the circuit and territorial courts of the United States, with powers of arresting and imprisoning or bailing offenders against the law of the United States, are hereby especially authorized and required to institute proceedings against every person who shall violate the provisions of this act, and cause him to be arrested and imprisoned, or bailed, as the case may be, for trial before such court of the United States or Territorial court as by law has cognizance of the offense, except in respect of the right of action accruing to the person aggrieved, and such district attorney shall cause such proceedings to be prosecuted to their termination, as in other cases, provided nothing contained in this section shall be construed to deny or defeat any right of civil action accruing to any person, whether by reason of this act or otherwise; and any district attorney who shall willfully fail to institute and prosecute the proceedings herein referred to shall for every cffense forfeit and pay the sum of five hundred dollars to the party aggriered thereby, to be recovered by an action of debt, with costs, and shall on conviction thereof he deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and be fined not less than one thousand nor more than five thousand dollars; and provided further that a judgment for the penalty in favor of the party aggrieved against any such district attorney, or a judgment upon an indictment against any such district attorney, shall be a bar to either prosecution respectively.

SEC. 4. That no citizen, possessing all other qualifications which are or may be prescribed by law, shall be disqualified for the service of a grand or petit juror in any court of the United States, or of any State, on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude; and any officer or other person charged with any duty of the selection or summoning of jurors, who shall exclude or fail to summon any citizen for the cause aforesaid, shall, on conviction thereof, be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and be fined not more than five thousand dollars.

Sec. 5. That all cases arising under the provisions of this act in the courts of the United States shall be reviewable by the Supreme Court of the United States, without regard to the sum in controversy, under the same provisions and regulations as are now provided by law for review of other causes in said court.

PARLIAMENTARY RULES

FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF PUBLIC ASSEMBLIES.

A knowledge of the rules which regulate the formation and order of business in public assemblies, is essential to every well informed citizen. Every citizen is obliged, at some time, to take part in the primary assemblies of the people. These are constantly held, not merely for political purposes, but for those of business-commercial

, literary, benevolent, or relig. ious. In addition to these primary assemblies, there are vari. ous and numerous organized associations, with some one or more of which almost every citizen is connected. The rules for the transaction of business in the assemblies, or associations, are substantially the same in all of them, the most important of which are substantially as follows:

ORGANIZATION.

1. In regularly organized bodies, such as Congress, the State Legislature, religious, political, or other associations, the constitution under which they act usually designates the title of their presiding officer, defines his duties, and provides for the mode of his appointment.

2. When a primary assembly of the people, or of any part of them, is called together for any purpose, the first thing to be done is to choose a presiding officer, usually designated as chair

Nan.

3. At the proper time some one rises, and moves that A. B. be appointed chairman of the meeting. When this is seconded the person making the motion puts the question, and if it be carried, A. B. takes the chair as presiding officer.

4. Regularly every public assembly should have a secretary, who is chosen in such manner as the body may direct.

5. The assembly may appoint such other officers as is deemed expedient; and on important occasions there are usually appointed several vice-presidents and additional secretaries.

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