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Election for the Nineteenth Term, commencing March 4, 1861,

and terminating March 3, 1865.

PRESIDENT.

VICE PRESIDENT.

STATES.

No. of Electors from

oach Btato.

Abraham Lincoln,
Jno. C. Breckenridge

of Kontucky.
:::John Bell, of

Stephen A. Douglas,
Tennesrov.
of Illinois.
Hannibal Hamlin,
Joneph Lane, or

.
Mannacbusotis.
Herschel V. Johnson

Техня.

... Edward Everett, of no Soares e colof Illinois.

of Georgia. in an Eu am 0 of Maine.

S 6 13 4 4 6 6 85 7

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8

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Maine..
New Hampshire..................
Massachusetts...
Rhode Island..
Connecticut...
Vermont.
New York,
New Jersey...
Penneylvania...
Delaware..
Maryland..
Virginia...
North Carolina.
South Carolina.
Georgia......
Kentucky............
Teunessee.
Ohio...
Louisian&..
Mississippi..
Indiana.
Illinois.
Alabama.
Missouri....
Arkansas..
Michigan.
Florida..
Texas.
bowu..
Wisconsin...
California..
Minnosota....
Oregon...

23

3 8 15 10

8 10 12 12 23 6 7 13 11 19 9 4 6 3

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Whole No. of Electors...... Majority........

180 157

Abraham Lincoln took the oath of office as President, and entered upon his duties, March 4th, 1861. Hannibal Hamlin took the oath of office as Vice-President, and attended in tho Senate as its President, on the 4th of March, 1861. The docession of Mr. Lincoln to the Presidency was made the pretext for the great rebellion of 1861.

Election for the Twentieth Term, commencing March 4,

1865, and terminating March 3, 1869.

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Maine.
Now Hampshire...
Massachusetts...
Rhode Island.
Counecticut.
Vermont.
New York...
New Jersey...
Pennsylvania....
Delaware...
Maryland..
Virginia..
Western Virginia
South Carolinu
North Carolina..
Georgin...
Kentucky.
Teupeuses
Obio.
Louisiana..
Mississippi.
ludinga..
Illinois.
Alabama,
Missouri,
Arkansas.
Michigan
Florida.
Toxas....
low&......
Wisconsin.
California. .....
Minnesota.
Oregon...
Novada.
Kansas.

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891

2121

21

213

21

Virginia, South Carolipa, North Carolina, Georgia, Tennesseo, Louisiana, Misvissippi, Alabama, Arkansas, Florida and Texus, being in rebellion, did not voto for Prusident and Vice President.

Whole nuwbor of Electorul votos, cast woro 233-for Lincoln and Johnson, 212; for McClellan and Pendleton, 21. Lincoln and Job nson's majority 191, the greatogt majority attuived since the organization of the Government.

Abrubam Lincoln took the oath of otico a. Prosidout and entered upon his deties March 4, 1865.

Andrew Johnson took the oath of ofice as Vico Prosident, and attended in the Seliute as its Presidont March 4, 1866.

ANDREW JOHNSON

Was born at Raleigh, North Carolina, December 29th, 1808, and is now in his sixtieth year. He lost his father when only four years old. At the age of ten he was apprenticed to a tailor in Raleigh, and served with him an apprenticeship of seven years. His mother was poor, and had been unable to give him any educational advantages ; but young Andy, whose unconquerable spirit was not to be restrained by any disadvantages, became stimulated with a desire for knowledge. He acquired the alphabet with no other instructions than those obtained from the journey. men with whom he worked. He learned to read from an old volume of speeches, loaned him by a friend, and thenceforward, after ten hours' work with his goose, needle, and scissors, applied himself with vigor to study for three or four hours each evening. In 1824, having completed his apprenticeship, he went to Laurens Court-house, South Carolina, where he worked as journeyman for two years. In 1826, he set out for the West; taking his mother, whom already, at his early age, and with his scanty wages, he was supporting. He made his home at Greenville, Tennessee, where he remained, and commenced business, and where he became a thriving and popular man. With the indefatigable thirst for knowledge which had characterized his early career, he still pursued his studies, and, in the evenings which followed a day of labor, with his wife an instructress, pushed on in the road to knowledge.

He entered early into political life, being elected to the first office he ever held--that of Alderman of the village of Greenville-in 1828. He was reëlected to the same office in 1829. In 1830, he was elected Mayor, and retained that position for three years. In 1835, he was sent to the Legislature, where he chiefly distinguished himself by taking strong grounds against a scheme of internal im. provements, which, he argued, was extravagant and useless. The measure was popular, however, and he was defeated in 1837. In 1838, he was a candidate again, and was this time successful. In 1840, he served as Presidential elector for the State at large on the Democratic ticket, and during

measures.

the campaign rendered efficient service to the party as a stump speaker. In 1841, he was elected to the State Senate, and, in 1843, at the age of thirty-five, he was elected to Congress, where he held his seat, being four times reëlected, until 1853. During this time he was thoroughly identified with the old Democratic party, and supported all the party

In 1853, he was elected Governor, after a very exciting contest, over Gustavus A. Henry. He was reëlected in 1855, over Meredith P. Gentry, the Whig candidate. At the expiration of his Gubernatorial term, in 1857, he was chosen United States Senator by a Democratic majority in the Legislature of Tennessee. In that body he commanded the respect of all his compeers, as an able, eloquent, and patriotic statesman. At the breaking out of the rebellion, Senator Andrew Johnson still proclaimed his allegiance to the United States, and continued to hold his seat in the Senate, though his course subjected him to much unpopularity, and even danger.

When, in the spring of 1862, our army had penetrated Tennessee to Nashville, and the northern and central portions of the States were wrested from rebel control, the President desired the services of a wise and sagacious man, of unquestionable loyalty, to act as Military Governor of that State; and he did not have long to look-Andrew Johnson was at once recognized as the man for the place, and, being commissioned a Brigadier-General, he repaired to Nashville, where he for two years discharged the delicate and responsible duty of his charge with a degree of wisdom and efficiency which challenged general admiration. Under his administration, the rebellion had steadily been losing its hold in Tennessee, and loyalty was as constantly cultivated and developed.

He was nominated for the Vice-Presidency by the Union Convention at Baltimore, June 8th, 1864, and was elected November 8, 1864, and was sworn into office March 4th, 1865.

President Lincolo died April 15. Andrew Johnson was sworn into office as President of the United States, on the same day, by Chief Justice Chase.

Soon after entering upon the duties of his office, he vetoed the Civil Rights Bill, the Constitutional Amendment, the Military Government Bill, and all the important bills passed by Congress; also suspended Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War, from office, during the recess of Congress; on the assembling of which, he sent them his reasons for so doing. Upon considering which, they reinstated Secretary Stanton. Whereupon the President is. sued an order removing him, and ordering Major-General Thomas, Adjutant-General of the army, to act as Secretary ad interim-the same being done without the consent or advice of the Senate-for which and many other acts committed by him, and by Congress deemed unconstitutional, the House did, on the 25th of February, 1868, impeach Andrew Johnson of high crimes and misdemeanors; and he was accordingly tried for the same by the Senate

the result of which trial will be found in the Impeachment Act, on another page.

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