The Imagery of Foreign Travel: Or Description Extracts from Scenes and Impressions in Egypt, India, &c. &c. &c

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Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, & Longmans, 1838 - 376 páginas
 

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Página 154 - Who passes the desert and says all is barren, all lifeless ? In the grey morning you may see the common pigeon, and the partridge, and the pigeon of the rock, alight before your very feet, and come upon the beaten camel-paths for food. They are tame, for they have not learned to fear, or to distrust the men who pass these solitudes. The camel-driver would not lift a stone to them ; and the sportsman could hardly find it in his heart to kill these gentle tenants of the desert: the deer might tempt...
Página 308 - To describe my feelings throughout this. wild scene with fidelity, would be impossible : at intervals, a shriek or groan told that men were falling around me ; but it was not always. that the tumult of the contest suffered me to catch these sounds. A constant feeling to the centre of the line, and the gradual diminution of our front, more truly bespoke the havock of death.
Página 79 - ... see, I suppose, our salaam. Next, in a common native palkee, its canopy crimson, and not adorned, came Scindiah himself. He was plainly dressed, with a reddish turban, and a shawl over his vest, and lay reclined, smoking a small gilt or golden calean. We stood up in our howdah and bowed ; he half rose in his palkee, and salaamed rather in a courteous manner. At this there was a loud cry of all his followers near, who sung out his titles, and the honour he had done us, &c. And all salaamed themselves...
Página 165 - We purchased a few trifles which these men, taught ty us to " ransack up the quiet grave," bring eagerly for sale, and then returned across the plain to our boat, passing and pausing before those celebrated statues so often described : they are seated on thrones, looking to the east, and on the Nile : in this posture they are upwards of fifty feet in height ; and their bodies, limbs, and heads, are large, spreading, and disproportioned. A frantic victor, baffled by the secret of its strange music,...
Página 308 - ... of death. As we moved, though slowly, yet ever a little in advance, our own killed and wounded lay behind us ; but we arrived among those of the enemy, and those of the Spaniards who had fallen in the first onset : we trod among the dead and dying, all reckless of them.
Página 161 - ... the colossal skeletons of giant temples are standing " in the unwatered sands, in solitude and silence. They are neither grey, nor blackened ; there is no lichen, no moss, no rank grass or mantling ivy, to robe them and conceal their deformities. Like the bones of man, they seem to whiten under the sun of the desert.
Página 167 - On either side are small apartments which you stoop down to enter, and the walls of which you find covered with paintings : scenes of life faithfully represented ; of every-day life, its pleasures and labours ; the instruments of its happiness, and of its crimes ! You turn to each other with a delight, not however unmixed with sadness, to mark how much the days of man then passed, as they do to this very hour. You see the labours of agriculture — the sower, the basket, the plough ; the steers ;...
Página 259 - ... that the traveller forgot, or forgave, the absence of the corn-field, the vineyard, and the cottage. " As the chill dews of evening were descending on our bivouack, near this last village, a staff-officer, with a courier, came galloping into it, and alighted at the quarter of our general. It was soon known among us, that a severe and sanguinary action had been fought by our brother soldiers at Talavera. Disjointed rumours spoke of a dear-bought field, a heavy loss, and a subsequent retreat. I...
Página 286 - They occupied themselves in removing their wounded from the foot of our position ; but as none of their troops broke up, it was generally concluded that they would renew their attacks on the morrow. In the course of the day, our men went down to a small brook, which flowed between the opposing armies, for water ; and French and English soldiers might be seen drinking out of the same narrow stream, and even leaning over to shake hands with each other. One private, of my own regiment, actually exchanged...
Página 154 - ... camel is impatient to rise ere you are well seated on him ; gives a shake, too, to warm his blood, and half dislodges you ; marches rather faster than by day, and gives, occasionally, a hard quick stamp with his broad callous foot. Our moon was far in her wane. She rose, however, about an hour after we started, all red, above the dark hills on our left ; yet higher rose, and paler grew, till at last she hung a silvery crescent in the deep blue sky. I claim for the traveller a love of that bright...

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