Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

CONTENTS.

OHAPTER I.

Organ ization of National Government.-- Constitutional powers. — Universal

equality.-Sovereignty of the people.-Elective franchise.....

CHAPTER II.

Colonial condition.— Early settlement. The first Constitution.-Signers of

the first Constitution. --Landing of the Pilgrims....

.23

CHAPTER III.

The Revolutionary War. - Throwing the tea into Boston Harbor.- Battle of

Lexington. — Battle of Bunker Hill. Declaration of Independence.

Articles of Confederation....

..32

CHAPTER IV.

Period immediately preceding the adoption of the Constitution.-Cession of

Territory to he United States.-Ordinance of 1784.--Vote on the slave

question.-One vote only wanted to prohibit Slavery.

.43

CHAPTER V.

Convention to amend the Articles of Confederation. They frame a Constitu-

tion. - Debates and proceedings of the Convention. — The negro in the

basis of representation.--Sermon of the Rev. Jonathan Edwards.-Letter

of Washington to Lafayette.-Ordinance of 1787.- Harrison advocates

Slavery...

...48

CHAPTER VI.

Meeting of first Congress under the Constitution.-George Washington elected

President.-John Adams, Vice-President.–Vote at the election. — First

business of Congress.-Powers of the President to remove from office.

Debates upon the powers of the President. — Tenure of civil office.-

Amendments to the Constitution...

.64

CHAPTER VII.

Slavery.-Its origin.-Laws concerning.-Abolition of.-Slavery amongst the

Ancients. - Address of the Anti-Slavery Association.-Divinity of Slav-

ery.....

CHAPTER VIII.

Territory of the United States. --- Government of the Territory. - Slavery in

the Territory.-Admission of Missouri.–Opposition to her admission.-

Missouri Compromise.-Position of the friends of Freedom and Slavery.-

Speeches upon both sides.....

CHAPTER IX.

Admission of Missouri. -- Annexation of Texas. - War between Mexico and

Texas.- Santa Anna in the field.-- Houston makes him prisoner.- War

between the United States and Mexico.-- Result of the war...

CHAPTER X.

Conquest and settlement of California. -Occupation of by Americans.- Rais-

ho 3xr Etsy.- Establishment of Government.-Debates in Con-

u. -kiusen ot. - Protest against.-Speeches of Clay, Webster,
in mo lang and others. — Calhoun will make California the “test

.. page 110

CHAPTER XI.
es do people to take Slaves into the Territories.- Interest and com-

l'united States and State Court decisions on. — Status of col-
PERU PORUS Saves real estate.- Runaway negroes may be tracked with
Las i Jone with circumspection ...

...128
CHAPTER XII.
We Proviso.-Slavery in Mexico.-In the Territories.- Laws of Spain and

v reitiag to.- Dred Scott decision.-Fugitive slave laws of Califor-
Picha - State Court decisions in case of Perkins and Archey.

.143
CHAPTER XIII.
Xpean party.-Its first organization.-Democratic party, 1840 to 1861.--

detouists. -- James G. Birney, Abolition candidate, Success of the
party.- Presidential elections of 1840, 1844, 1848, 1852 and 1856.-Nom-
ination of Harrison, Scott and Polk.- Whigs nominate Clay.-Birney re-
Ih unted. -- Settlement of the Oregon claims.- Treaty respecting Ore-
812 - Thomas H. Benton's views on the Oregon boundary.-Gen. Taylor
electxi President. — “Hunkers" and "Barnburuers.”—Lewis Cass nom-
inated. -- Franklin Pierce nominated.--Election of Pierce.-Nomination of
Buchanan and Fremont. — Buchanan's Cabinet. – Floyd moves arms
South. His resignation. - Speeches of Southern leaders. — Southern
journals.-Slavery is Divine.- Would "extend it even to Yankees."..161

CHAPTER XIV.
Presidential campaign of 1860.-Nomination of Abraham Lincoln.—Stephen

A. Douglas, — John C. Breckinridge. – John Bell. -- Lincoln elected. --
Soession of Slave States.-Last days of Buchanan's Administration. -
The Loudon “Times" on Buchanan's official conduct.-Platforms of the
parties. - Officers of the Southern Confederacy..

..199
CHAPTER XV.
Meeting of Thirty-sixth Congress. Second session, December 30, 1860. —

Closing scenes of Buchanan's Administration.-Southern Senators and
Representatives.--Organization of the “Southern Confederacy.”— Officers
of Alexander H. Stephens.-His politics.—"Corner-stone and other
speeches. Jefferson Davis.--He desires more arms sent South....... 232

CHAPTER XVI.
President Lincoln leaves Springfield for Washington.--James Buchanan leaves

the Executive Chair. - Republican party enter upon the administration of
ntirirs. - Attack on Sumter.-War begun.- Democrats join the rebels.
Jeterson Davis issues a Proclamation.—War spirit of the Free States.
Massachusetts sends the first soldiers. They are attacked at Bal imore.
The President calls for troops. – Terms of compromise. — Horatio Sey-

His complicity with the rebels.-Letter from George N. Sanders.
Seeming success of the rebels.-Southern speeches, resolutions and the
pross agninst compromise.-Fernando Wood, Mayor of New York City,
recommends its secession.- He predicts a Pacific Confederacy.- Pod.cy of
the Federal Government during the first two years of the war.-Announce-
ment of Emancipation Proclamation.- Effect of.-Extracts from Lins
message of 1861.- Harmony of the Government.-Democrats plot to fire
Northern cities. —- Confession of Kennedy. Contagious disease spread
among Union soldiers....

.260
CHAPTER XVII.
Grant takes command of the Armies of the Republic. — His address to his

soldiers. - His letter to Hon. E. B. Washburne. - Jefferson Davis still
hopeful of success.-A. H. Stephens' views of peace.--Gen. Sherman's

mour.

Field Order No. 68. His letter to Gen. Burbridge. - Makes President

Lincoln a Christmas gift of Savannah. - His letter to Maj. R. M. Saw-

yer.- Massacre at Fort Pillow.-Sheridan's victory at Winchester.--Havoc

of the war in 1864.–England supplies the rebels with ships.--Effects of

the Presidential election of 1864. -- Treasonable organizations of the

Democrats of the Free States.--" Knights of the Golden Circle."--Their

plans.

CHAPTER XVIII.

Presidential election of 1864.–Platforms of the parties.- Removal of Gen.

McClellan. – Democratic National Convention. Sheridan appointed a

Major-General.-Vote in the Presidential election.--Policy of the Repub-

lican party.--Victories of the Union armies.-President Lincoln's annual

message of 1864.–Jefferson Davis' message to the rebel Congress....313

CHAPTER XIX.

Perplexities of the President of the “Confederacy.”—His message to Con-

gress. He relies upon the "unquenclable" spirit of the people. He is

grieved at the non-recognition of his Government by other nations.-His

views upon placing the negro in the Army.--Peace Commissioners from

the South.--Second inauguration of Abraham Lincoin as President.-His

inaugural address.-Hopeful prospects of the Union cause.-9.ength of

and operations of the Navy.-Attack on and fall of Fort Fisher.-Rebel

privateers. - Where built. —Capture of.–Sinking of the “Alabama" by

the “Kearsarge.' United States Navy in the war of 1812. Colored

soldiers in the Army...

.333

CHAPTER XX.

Strength of the Army.-Important battles.-Fall of Richmond. Disordered

Aight of the inhabitants.-Surrender of Lee and Johnston.-Number of

troops in the field.-Number slain.-Number of colored soldiers.-Popu-

lation of North and South.-Grant's and Sherman's farewell addresses to

their soldiers.—Jefferson Davis issues a Proclamation. His flight South-

ward.-His capture..

.350

CHAPTER XXI.

Enthusiasm at the fall of Richmond.-Assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Attempt to nurder W. H. Seward.—Andrew Johnson sworn in President

of the United States.-Capture of Booth, the assassin of Lincoln.-Cap-

ture of the other conspirators. – Trial and sentence of.-Rewards offered

for Jefferson Davis, Jacob Thompson, Clement C. Clay, Beverly Tucker,

George N. Sanders and W. C. Cleary.

.378

CHAPTER XXII.

Reconstruction.-Status of the rebel States.-The President's policy.- Atti-

tude of the Democracy.-Action of Congress.-Amendments to the Con-

stitution.-Civil Rights Bill..

.390

CHAPTER XXIII.

Federal Union.--Constitutions of the several States.-Elective franchise in the

several States. Who are eligible to office.—Colonial royal charters.-

Adoption of State Constitutions.-Of the Federal Constitution.-Admis-

sion of States into the Union....

..407

CHAPTER XXIV.

Constitution of the United States.—Amendments to.-Powers and duties of

officers under.-Citizenship.-Laws of South Carolina.–Attempt to sell

British subjects..

.440

CHAPTER XXV.

Total area and population of the United States.-Foreigners in America.-

Their numbers, influence, politics, peculiarities, conditions.--Archbishop

Hughes as a citizen.-His letter....

.453

CHAPTER XXVI.

Naturalization laws of the United States.--Decisions of United States and

State Courts upon.-Pre-emption laws of the United States.-Rights of

... page 469

aliens to settle upon and hold lands. - United States and State Court
decisions on...

CHAPTER XXVII.
Arraignment of Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, on charges
of high crimes and misdemeanors.– Final vote....

.483
CHAPTER XXVIII.
Citizenship in the Southern Confederacy:-Confederate Constitution. No

citizens of the Confederacy.—Conscripting the sovereign people.The
South tired of feeding foreigners; they must leave the Confederacy.--All
the people must labor.--Southern Congress on Lincoln's Emancipation
Proclamation.-The “black flag" to be hoisted..

.493
CHAPTER XXIX.
Political parties.-Washington's Administration.- Federal and Anti-Federal

parties.-First “Democratic clubs.”—Friends of Robespierre.- Washing-
ton condemns the Jacobin clubs.-First National Convention in America.
Origin of the Democratic party. - First called Republican. - National
Republicans.-Origin of the Whig party.-Republicans and Democrats.-
Their principles and practices.....

.....503
CHAPTER XXX. .
Education in America before the Revolution.-Freg schools first established

in New England. --Whisky, its cost and influence.-Colleges and profes-
sional schools. - Number of Colleges and Schools in 1860. — Number of
pupils, foreign and native.-Libraries in the Union.---Newspapers.-His-
tory of.-Number in the Union.-California issues most papers......517

CHAPTER XXXI.
Presidential election of 1868.--Ulysses S. Grant elected President.-Schuyler

Colfax, Vice-President.--Horatio Seymour and Francis P. Blair detented.--
Republican and Democratic Conventions.-Votes cast for each party.--
Jolinson's Amnesty Proclamations. - Biographical sketch of Grant.
“Unconditional surrender.”—"Fight it out on this line."-How Pres-
idents are elected..

....530
CHAPTER XXXII.

.
The New Nation.— Progress of Republicanism. — Influence of political par-
ties.-Elective franchise.—“Woman's Rights.".

.551
CHAPTER XXXIII.
Beauties of Democracy.-Spirit of Republican liberty..

..565
CHAPTER XXXIV.
General of the American Armies..

..585
CHAPTER XXXV.
Existing Republics of the world in 1869..
APPENDIX.-Presidents of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Con-

federation; Presidents of the United States under the Constitution; votes
for and by what political party elected; Electoral College and popular
vote; Senators and Representatives in Forty-first Congress; party elected
by; population of the United States from 1790 to 1860; composition of
the American population; area of all the States and Territories; vative
citizens in America; foreigners in America-Germans and Irish; paupers
and crime in the United States; soldiers in the wars of 1776 and 1861-5;
Army furnished by the several States; composition of the Army; newspa-
pers in America; finance of the United States; banks, railroads, canals,
real and personal property in the United States; speeches of W. H. Sew-
ard, Joshua R. Giddings, Charles Sumner, William Lloyd Garrison, Thad-
deus Stevens, Edward D. Baker, Andrew Jackson, Josiah Quincy, Col.
Isaac Barré, Daniel Webster, Mr. Morris, Abraham Lincoln, Henry Clay,
Patrick Henry; first American Constitution; United Colonies of New
England; Declaration of Independence; Articles of Confederation; Con-
stitution of the United States; Confederate Constitution...

..601

.591

« ZurückWeiter »