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81

OLIVER CROMWELL.
Still thy meek spirit in thy flock survives,
Consistent still their doctrines rule their lives;
Thy followers only have effac'd the shame
Inscrib’d by SLAVERY on the Christian name!

MORE.

The only in the last line but one, is now happily incorrect, as the British Parliament has also effaced the shame by the abolition of the slave-trade.

At Honiton, Mrs. H , the worthy niece of the late Dr. William Harris, shewed me a curious Latin book of her uncle's, printed in the time of the Protectorate, and executed with typographical beauty. It contained an extravagant panegyric on the character of Oliver Cromwell, and was decorated with a striking likeness of that celebrated man on horseback. The resemblance between the two Latin terms, Olivus, an olive-tree, and Oliverus, Oliver, is the foundation of this very complimentary performance. Accordingly the frontispiece exhibits a fine lofty olive-tree, on the trunk of which, near the root, is inscribed in large letters, Oliverus ; and on its numerous branches, stretching themselves forth on either side, are engraven the chief virtues which adorn humanity. The author having informed us, at the commencement of the treatise, that by the trunk is meant OLIVER CROMWELL, a whole chapter is assigned to each of the virtues, shewing that they are all, in their plentitude, centred in this great man ; and that, therefore, he is entitled to universal admiration! This curiosity convinced me, that an excessive adulation of men in power, is by no means peculiar to monarchical governments.

82

TOSSILS. Nor must I omit to inform you, that a gentleman in this neighbourhood, at whose house I passed an agreeable day, favoured the company with a sight of some fossils, in which the taste of the selector was conspicuous. By particular request, several botanical sketches were also brought out for inspection. The investigation of the beauties of nature is a laudable employ; to the Supreme Author such an exercise of our powers is a tribute of praise, and to the contemplator of them it yields an heartfelt satisfaction. When we thus rise from fossils to vegetables—from vegetables to animals—from animals to Man, it amounts to a full proof of Deity. To talk of Chance insults the human understanding—it is a term invented to conceal our ignorance. Can Chaos produce spontaneously this fair form of nature? Can Fate arrange the various movements of the material creation with such delicacy and harmony? Can a mere nullity conduct and sustain a system thus operating with design and regularity ?

IT CANNOT BE for since this beauteous world
Was rais'd by God, bis PROVIDENCE must rule
The vast machine.-Chance is an idol toy
For fools to play with :-Should fix'd nature change
Her well-known course, and vary from the laws
That guide the system-should the elements,
Whereof all things in this our lower world
Are formed, desert the station which they hold
In concert with the whole---should the great frame
Of that bright beavenly arch, which o'er our heads
Shines with refulgent light, give way, and feel
A dissolution-should celestial spheres
Forget their wonted course, and devious turn,

PROOFS OF THE DEITY.

83 As Chance misguides should the bright lamp of heav'n Withdraw his light, and the pale wand'ring moon Mistake her well-known path-should seasons mix In wild confusion, or expiring minds Breathe their last gasp-should earth's fair fruitage droon Like children on the wither'd breasts that fail Of proper food-should Chance or Fortune reign With arbitrary sway-what would become Of Man himself, for whom these things are made ? Idle surmise! There is a living GOD Who rules supreme, under whose brooding wing ALL NATURE RESTS SECURE!

SOCRATES.

I remain, dear Sir,

Yours, &c.

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TAUNTON; ORIGIN OF ITS NAME; CHARMING SITUATION; MANU.

FACTURES; SINGULAR MODE OF ELECTION ; DR. TOULMAN'S HISTORY OF TAUNTON; MONMOUTH'S REBELLION; THE DUKE CROWNED KING; HIS DEFEAT AND EXECUTION; BARBARITIES OF JEFFERIES AND KIRKE TOWARDS HIS FOLLOWERS; ANECDOTES OF JEFFERIES ; INSCRIPTION BY SOUTHEY ; REFLECTIONS ON CRUELTY.

DEAR SIR, My friend having joined me at Honiton, we next day proceeded eighteen miles onwards towards Taunton, in the county of Somerset. The road was pleasant, and on the right a neat mansion was pointed out to me as the birth-place of our late premier, the Honourable Henry Addington, now Lord Viscount Sidmouth : his being a native of this part of the island may account for his having taken the title by which he is distinguished. His short-lived administration, however the subject of animadversion to jarring and opposite parties, was conducive to peace and to prosperity!

Taunton is a corruption of the original name, Thone Town, or Tone Town, which is derived from its situation upon the banks of the river Thone or Tone. It is 145 miles from London, has been termed the key of the West of England, and Camden calls it one of the eyes of the county. It is situated in one of the richest valleys in the kingdom. The beauties of the vale of TauntonDean are every where known and admired. The

REV. HENRY GROVE,

85 town itself is pleasant, the streets are spacious and handsome, while the lofty tower of St. Mary Magdalen strikes the eye with grandeur and majesty. A castle was built here by one of the Bishops of Winchester, to the prelates of which see, this town and deanery belonged, even before the Conquest. It was a building of extent; and in the hall, which, with the outward gate and porter's lodge, are still standing, are held, for the most part, the assizes for the county. In Taunton many persons are engaged in the manufacture of serges, duroys, shalloons, and other woollen stuffs, in the weaving of which 1100 looms are said to have been once employed! The silk manufactory, however, now begins to flourish here, and must contribute to its prosperity. The town is indebted to the activity of the late Sir Benjamin Hammet, a native of this place, for its modern improvements.

Here are two parish churches, and several respectable dissenting places of worship, a well endowed grammar-school and alms-houses. The election of members of parliament here is singular: for every potwallopper, that is, all who dress their own victuals, are entitled to be ranked among the voters. Hence the inmates, or lodgers, on the eve of an election, have each a fire in the street, at which they dress victuals publicly, lest their votes should be called in question! In the

reign of William, the river Tone was made navi· gable for barges, from Taunton to Bridgewater.

The Rev. Henry Grove was a native of this town; .

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