English Grammar on the Productive System: A Method of Instruction Recently Adopted in Germany and Switzerland : Designed for Schools and Academies

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E.H. Butler & Company, 1847 - 192 Seiten

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Seite 158 - Insomuch that the multitude wondered, when they saw the dumb to speak, the maimed to be whole, the lame to walk, and the blind to see : and they glorified the God of Israel.
Seite 185 - We cannot indeed have a single image in the fancy that did not make its first entrance through the sight; but we have the power of retaining, altering, and compounding those images which we have once received, into all the varieties of picture and vision...
Seite 168 - The wisest princes need not think it any diminution to their greatness, or derogation to their sufficiency, to rely upon counsel. God himself is not without, but hath made it one of the great names of his blessed Son : The Counsellor. Solomon hath pronounced that in counsel is stability.
Seite 188 - PUNCTUATION is the art of dividing a written composition into sentences, or parts of sentences, by points or stops, for the purpose of marking the different pauses, which the sense and an accurate pronunciation require. The Comma represents the shortest pause ; the Semicolon, a pause double that of the comma ; the Colon, double that of the semicolon ; and the Period, double that of the colon.
Seite 158 - Then Jesus called his disciples unto him, and said, I have compassion on the multitude, because they continue with me now three days, and have nothing to eat : and I will not send them away fasting, lest they faint in the way.
Seite 161 - This rule arises from the nature and idiom of our language, and from as plain a principle as any on which it is founded; namely, that a word which has the article before it, and the possessive preposition of after it, must be a noun: and, if a noun, it ought to follow the construction of a noun, and not to have the regimen of a verb. It is the participial termination of this sort of words that is apt to deceive us, and make us treat them as if they were of an amphibious species, partly nouns and...
Seite 67 - heard," denote things that are past ; but they occurred in this year, in this week, and today ; and still there remains a part of this year, week, and day, whereof I speak. In general, the perfect tense may be applied wherever the action is connected with the present time, by the actual existence, either of the author, or of the work, though it may have been performed many centuries ago ; but if neither the author nor the work now remains, it cannot be used. We may say, " Cicero has written orations...
Seite 130 - Of this rule there are many violations to be met with ; a few of which may be sufficient to put the learner on his guard. " Each of the sexes should keep within its particular bounds, and content themselves with the advantages of their particular districts:" better thus: "The sexes should keep within their particular bounds," &c. " Can any one, on their entrance into the world, be fully secure that they shall not be deceived?" " on his entrance,
Seite 31 - Tense. Singular. Plural. 1. I shall have been, 1. We shall have been, 2. Thou wilt have been, 2. You will have been, 3. He will have been ; 3. They will have been.
Seite 21 - Lupin was, comforted by the mere voice and presence of such a man; and, though he had merely said 'a verb must agree with its nominative case in number and person...

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