The Principles of the Administrative Law of the United States

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1905 - 480 Seiten
 

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Seite 169 - It is a general and undisputed proposition of law that a municipal corporation possesses and can exercise the following powers, and no others : First, those granted in express words; second, those necessarily or fairly implied in or incident to the powers expressly granted ; third, those essential to the accomplishment of the declared objects and purposes of the corporation — not simply convenient, but indispensable. Any fair, reasonable, substantial doubt concerning the existence of power is resolved...
Seite 389 - Claims, of all claims not exceeding ten thousand dollars founded upon the Constitution of the United States or any law of Congress, or upon any regulation of an Executive Department, or upon any contract, express or Implied, with the Government of the United States...
Seite 265 - The duties of all public officers are, or at least admit of being made, so plain and simple that men of intelligence may readily qualify themselves for their performance...
Seite 166 - A municipal corporation proper is created mainly for the interest, advantage, and convenience of the locality and its people. A county organization is created almost exclusively with a view to the policy of the state at large, for purposes of political organization and civil administration, in matters of finance, of education, of provision for the poor, of military organization, of the means of travel and transport, and especially for the general administration of justice.
Seite 32 - ... in the government of this commonwealth, the legislative department shall never exercise the executive and judicial powers, or either of them ; the executive shall never exercise the legislative and judicial powers, or either of them ; the judicial shall never exercise the legislative and executive powers, or either of them ; — to the end that it may be a government of laws, and not of men...
Seite 437 - ... on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude...
Seite 357 - It is manifest that it was not left to the legislative power to enact any process which might be devised. The article is a restraint on the legislative as well as on the executive and judicial powers of the government, and cannot be so construed as to leave congress free to make any process 'due process of law
Seite 401 - But where jurisdiction over the subject-matter is invested by law in the judge, or in the court which he holds, the manner and extent in which the jurisdiction shall be exercised are generally as much questions for his determination as any other questions involved in the case, although upon the correctness of his determination in these particulars the validity of his judgments may depend.
Seite 357 - That the warrant now in question is legal process is not denied. It was issued in conformity with an act of Congress ; but is it due process of law ? The Constitution contains no description of those processes which it was intended to allow or forbid. It does not even declare what principles are to be applied to ascertain whether it be due process. It is manifest that it was not left to the legislative power to enact any process which might be devised.

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