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AN INDUCTIVE STUDY

Frederick Welton BY

F. W. COLEGROVE, PH.D., D.D.
Professor of Philosophy in the University of Washington

WITH AN INTRODUCTION

BY

G. STANLEY HALL, LL.D.

"And slight withal may be the things which bring
Back on the heart the weight which it would fling
Aside forever!

It may be a sound-

A tone of music-summer's eve-or spring-

A flower-the wind-the ocean which shall wound,
Striking the electric chain wherewith we are darkly bound."
-Childe Harold.

NEW YORK

HENRY HOLT AND COMPANY

1900

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PREFACE

An effort has been made to study the memory or memories by the inductive method. More than one-third of the work is new material, and the aim has been to restate the remainder in accordance with the latest scientific facts, yet in language so simple as to be easily understood. As to the success of the effort the reader will judge. Although more than one-half of the manuscript was rewritten after a visit to several German universities, most of the facts were collected and put in much their present form at Clark University. To President G. Stanley Hall, one of the most scholarly and suggestive of classroom lecturers, the writer is chiefly indebted. Professor W. H. Burnham and other members of the philosophical faculty gave valuable judgments and criticisms. Mr. Louis N. Wilson, the librarian, rendered efficient aid. The writer desires, furthermore, to acknowledge his indebtedness to Dr. Adolph C. Meyer of the Worcester State Hospital for frequent assistance. He is also deeply indebted to the superintendents and physicians in the State Hospitals

of New York, Middletown, Conn., and the Hartford Retreat; also to the many professors and instructors in colleges, normal schools, academies, and high schools who have sent returns to the questionnaire edited in Chapter VI. If space permitted, it would be pleasant to mention a long list of names. The large amount of assistance, unselfishly given by many individuals, constitutes a most pleasing recollection of a task for the present, at least, reluctantly brought to a close.

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON,
January, 1900.

INTRODUCTION

BY G. STANLEY HALL, PH.D., LL.D.

THE author of the following treatise has had a rich and varied experience as academic principal, professor, and, later, president of Ottawa University, and has been an experienced and successful academic teacher of philosophical subjects. As Honorary Fellow in Psychology at Clark University, he has devoted two years to a careful and comprehensive study of the most recent literature upon the many phases of memory, and herewith presents to psychologists and teachers a general survey of his subject, such as has been long desired but long delayed.

The points of view represented by the different chapters are so varied that they have required an unusually large range of methods. The history of previous and current theories on memory had to be carefully gone over and concisely epitomized; the biological orientation gives breadth of view; the recent and striking advances in the study of the minute anatomy of the brain, so far as this is thought to be asso

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