The Boy's Summer Book: Descriptive of the Season, Scenery, Rural Life, and Country Amusements

Capa
Harper & Brothers, 1847 - 128 páginas
 

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Página 5 - Under the greenwood tree Who loves to lie with me, And tune his merry note Unto the sweet bird's throat — Come hither, come hither, come hither! Here shall he see No enemy But winter and rough weather. Who doth ambition shun And loves to live i' the sun, Seeking the food he eats And pleased with what he gets — Come hither, come hither, come hither!
Página 114 - Bright guardians of the blue-browed night ! What are ye in your native skies ? I know not ! neither can I know, Nor on what leader ye attend, Nor whence ye came, nor whither go. Nor what your aim or end. I know they must be holy things That from a roof so sacred shine. Where sounds the beat of angel-wings. And footsteps echo all Divine.
Página 121 - Whilst through the quagmires and red water plashes The boys run dabbling thorough thick and thin, One tears his hose, another breaks his shin, This, torn and tatter'd, hath with much ado Got by the briars ; and that hath lost his shoe: This drops his band ; that headlong falls for haste; Another cries behind for being last: With sticks and stones, and many a sounding hollow, The little fool with no small sport they follow...
Página 121 - Then as a nimble squirrel from the wood, Ranging the hedges for his filbert-food, Sits pertly on a bough his brown nuts cracking, And from the shell the sweet white kernel taking, Till with their crooks and bags a sort of boys, To share with him, come with so great a noise That he is forced to leave a nut nigh broke, And for his life leap to a neighbour oak...
Página 114 - Come softened by the distant shore; Though I have heard them many a time, They never rung so sweet before. A silence rests upon the hill, A listening awe pervades the air; The very flowers are shut and still, And bowed as if in prayer. And in this hushed and breathless close, O'er earth and air and sky and sea, A still low voice in silence goes, Which speaks alone, great God, of Thee.
Página 114 - I know not ! neither can I know, Nor on what leader ye attend, Nor whence ye came, nor whither go, Nor what your aim or end. I know they must bo holy things That from a roof so sacred shine, Where sounds the beat of angel-wings, And footsteps echo all Divine. Their mysteries I never sought, Nor hearkened to what Science tells, For oh ! in childhood I was taught That God amidst them dwells.
Página 121 - Got by the briars ; and that hath lost his shoe: This drops his band ; that headlong falls for haste; Another cries behind for being last: With sticks and stones, and many a sounding hollow, The little fool with no small sport they follow, Whilst he from tree to tree, from spray to spray, Gets to the wood, and hides him in his dray.
Página 114 - All, all is mute below. And other eves as sweet as this Will close upon as calm a day. And, sinking down the deep abyss. Will, like the last, be swept away ; Until eternity is gained, That boundless sea without a shore.
Página 113 - O'er earth, and air, and sky, and sea, That still low voice in silence goes, Which speaks alone, great God ! of Thee. The whispering leaves, the far-off brook, The linnet's warble fainter grown, The hive-bound...
Página 95 - Girls and boys come out to play. The moon it shines as bright as day...

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