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Maid of Athens, ere we part
Maid of my love, sweet Genevieve
Martial, the things that do attain
Mary, I believed thee true
Meanwhile, the adversary of God and man
Memory, hither come
Men are but children of a larger growth
Methought I saw my late espoused saint
Mild offspring of a dark and sullen sire!
Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour
Mine be a cot beside the hill.
Money that, like the swords of kings
Moon of harvest, herald mild
Mortality behold and fear!
Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors
Mourn, helpless Caledonia, mourn.
Much have I travelled in the realms of gold
Must all tradition then be set aside?
My author and disposer, what thou bid'st
My baby is sleeping overhead
My days among the dead are passid
My eye, descending from the hill, surveys
My eyes make pictures when they're shut
My Fair, no beauty of thine will last .
My good blade carves the casques of men
My hair is gray, but not with years
“My hawk is tired of perch and hood
My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains
My little love, do you remember
My loved, my honoured, much respected friend!
My mind to me a kingdom is .
My pensive Sara! thy soft cheek reclined
My Phillis hath the morning Sun
My silks and fine array
My soul turn from them; -- turn we to survey
Mysterious Night! when our first parent knew
Nay, do not think I flatter
Near yonder copse, where once the garden smiled
Never any more
Night is the Sabbath of mankind
No coward soul is mine
No man has more contempt than I of breath
No more shall the meads be deck'd with Aowers
No, no, fair heretic, it needs must be
No sooner had the Almighty ceased, but all
No stir in the air, no stir in the sea
No, 'tis slander
None are all evil-quickening round his heart
None remember thee! thou whose heart
Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note
Not far advanced was morning day
Not to know vice at all, and keep true state
Not with more glories, in th' ethereal plain
Now came still Evening on, and Twilight gray
Now, fare-thee-well, England: no further I'll roam
Now glory to the Lord of hosts, from whom all glories are
Now is the winter of our discontent
Now my co-mates, and brothers in exile
Now nature hangs her mantle green
Now that all hearts are glad, all faces bright
Now the bright morning star, day's harbinger .
Now whilst he dreams, o Muses, wind him round!
Nuns fret not at their convent's narrow room
O, and is all forgot?
O'blest of Heav'n, whom not the languid songs

PAGE.
George Gordon, Lord Byron. 435
Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 325
The Earl of Surrey

2
Thomas Moore

367
John Milton

85
William Blake
John Dryden.

113
John Milton

95
Henry Kirke White

395
William Wordsworth

288
Samuel Rogers

256
Samuel Butler

102
Henry Kirke White

394
Francis Beaumont

34
William Shakespeare

47
Tobias Smollett

161
John Keats

477
John Dryden

108
John Milton

83
H. E. H. King

604
Robert Southey

339
Sir John Denham

103
Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 325
Alice Meynell

614
Alfred Tennyson
George Gordon, Lord Byron. 436
Walter Scott
John Keats

474
Owen Meredith

595
Robert Burns

237
Sir Edward Dyer

19
Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

329
Sir Edward Dyer

18
William Blake

228
Oliver Goldsmith

191
Joseph Blanco White
William Shakespeare

37
Oliver Goldsmith

185
Robert Browning
Samuel Butler

102
Emily Brontë.

569
John Dryden.

114
Thomas Carew

67
Sir John Suckling
John Milton
Robert Southey

343
William Shakespeare
George Gordon, Lord Byron. 421
Lady Norton.
Rev. Charles Wolfe
Walter Scott
Ben Jonson

346

556

46

8
Alexander Pope

132
John Milton

83
Robert Bloomfield

259
Lord Macaulay

492
William Shakespeare

53
William Shakespeare

40
Robert Burns

241
William Wordsworth

290
John Milton

100
Bryan Waller Procter

400
William Wordsworth

284
William Shakespeare

43
Mark Akenside

508
438
301

467

619

378

O blithe new-comer! I have heard
“O brightest of my children dear, earth-born
O Brignall banks are wild and fair
o force of faith! O strength of virtuous will!
O God! methinks it were a happy life
O God, whose thunder shakes the sky
O Happiness! our being's end and aim!
O Hearkener to the loud-clapping shears
O, it is hard to work for God.
O lay thy hand in mine, dear!
O listen, listen, ladies gay!
O Love, come back, across the weary, way
O! love of loves! — to thy white hand is given
O lovely Mary Donnelly, it's you I love the best!
O lovers' eyes are sharp to see
O Mary, at thy window be
O may I join the choir invisible
O my Luve's like a red, red rose
O Nightingale, that on yon bloomy spray
O now, for ever
O only Source of all our light and life
“O open the door, some pity to show
O rose! who dares to name thee?
O Sandy, why leaves thou thy Nelly to mourn?

saw you not fair Ines?
O so drowsy! In a daze
O Swallow, Swallow, flying, flying South
O, those little, those little blue shoes!
O'thou, that, with surpassing glory crown'd
O! thou undaunted daughter of desires
O Thou who dry'st the mourner's tear!
O thou, who sit'st a smiling bride
O Time, who knowest a lenient hand to lay
O unseen Spirit! now a calm divine
O were my love yon lilac fair
O! wherefore come ye forth in triumph from the North
O, why should the spirit of mortal be proud?
O wild West Wind, thou breath of autumn's being
O world! O life! O time!
“Oye wild groves, O where is now your bloom!
O yet we trust that somehow good .
O young Lochinvar is come out of the west .
Oh! blame not the bard, if he fly to the bowers
Oh! breathe not his name, let it sleep in the shade
Oh! doubt me not the season
Oh fair to be, oh sweet to be
Oh, Mary, go and call the cattle home"
Oh! may I live exempted (while I live)
Oh, no! we never mention him, his naine is never heard
Oh Reader! hast thou ever stood to see
Oh Rome! my country! city of the soul!
“Oh seek not destin'd evils to divine”
Oh sleep! it is a gentle thing :
Oh! snatched away in beauty's bloom
Oh! that the desert were my dwelling place
Oh, that those lips had language! Life has passed
Oh! the days are gone, when beauty bright.
Oh, thou Parnassus! whom I now survey
Oh! why left I my hame?
Obscurest night involved the sky
O'er the glad waters of the dark blue sea
O'er the level plains, where mountains greet me as I go
O'er the wide earth, on mountain and on plain .
Of a' the airts the wind can blaw
Of all the thoughts of God that are .
Of all the torments, all the cares
Of comfort no man speak.

PAGE.
William Wordsworth

268
John Keats

469
Walter Scott

309
Robert Southey

337
William Shakespeare

52
Thomas Chatterton

216
Alexander Pope

145
John Keats
Frederick William Faber 564
Gerald Massey

586
Walter Scott

297
Philip Bourke Marston
Rev. George Croly

383
William Allingham

587
Walter Scott

315
Robert Burns

231
George Eliot

575
Robert Burns

233
John Milton

94
William Shakespeare
Arthur Hugh Clough

570
Walter Scott

314
Elizabeth Barrett Browning 513
Allan Ramsay

127
Thomas Hood

490
Robert Williams Buchanan 607
Alfred Tennyson

540
William Cox Bennett

576
John Milton

81
Richard Crashaw

74
Thomas Moore
William Collins

171
William Lisle Bowles

248
John Sterling

505
Robert Burns

246
Lord Macaulay

494
William Knox

437
Percy Bysshe Shelley

446
Percy Bysshe Shelley

451
James Beattie

214
Alfred Tennyson

543
Walter Scott

300
Thomas Moore

370
Thomas Moore

367
Thomas Moore

373
Lewis Morris

596
Charles Kingsley

571
William Cowper

196
Thomas Haynes Bayley

485
Robert Southey

339
George Gordon, Lord Byron 415
Walter Savage Landor 349
Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

318
George Gordon, Lord Byron

431
George Gordon, Lord Byron

420
William Cowper .

206
Thomas Moore

371
George Gordon, Lord Byron 409
Robert Gilfillan

528
William Cowper

209
George Gordon, Lord Byron 420
Winthrop Mackworth Praed 500
William Wordsworth

289
Robert Burns.

234
Elizabeth Barrett Browning :

523
William Walsh

115
William Shakespeare

50
107

263

.

Of Heaven or Hell I have no power to sing
Of man's first disobedience, and the fruit
Of Nelson and the North
Of these the false Achitophel was first .
Of this fair volume which we wond do name
Oft I had heard of Lucy Gray
Oft, in the lone church-yard at night I've seen
Ofi, in the stilly night
Oft may the spirits of the dead descend
Oft, oft methinks, the while with thee.
Often rebuked, yet always back returning
On either side the river lie.
On foot they came
On Jordan's banks the Arab's camels stray
On Leven's banks, while free to rove
On Linden when the sun was low
On the green hill top
On the wide level of a mountain's head
On these white cliffs, that calm above the flood
On those great waters now I am
On what foundation stands the warrior's pride
Once did she hold the gorgeous East in see
Once, in the flight of ages past
One day I wrote her name upon the strand
One day, nigh weary of the irksome way
One day, one day, our lives shall seem
“One in herself, not rent by schism, but sound
One more unfortunate
One morn a Peri at the gate
One struggle more, and I am free
One word is too often profaned
“Open the temple-gates unto my love
Opinion governs all mankind .
Or rushing thence, in one diffusive band
Or view the Lord of the unerring bow
Our bugles sang truce — for the night-cloud had lowered
Our pains are real things, and all
“Out in the meadows the young grass springs”
Out of the church she followed them

PAGE.
William Morris

598
John Milton

77
Thomas Campbeli

360
John Dryden.
William Drummond

16
William Wordsworth
Robert Blair

147
Thomas Moore

379
Samuel Rogers

251
Samuel Taylor Coleridge . 325
Emily Brontë.

569
Alfred Tennyson

530
Robert Southey

334
George Gordon, Lord Byron

430
Tobias Smollett

164
Thomas Campbell

361
Charles Lamb

347
Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 327
William Lisle Bowles

248
George Wither

62
Samuel Johnson .

157
William Wordsworth

287
James Montgomery

291
Edmund Spenser

26
Edmund Spenser

20
Lewis Morris.

596
John Dryden

IIO
Thomas Hood

488
Thomas Moore

363
George Gordon, Lord Byron

427
Percy Bysshe Shelley

458
Edmund Spenser

24
Samuel Butler

103
James Thomson

150
George Gordon, Lord Byron
Thomas Campbell
Samuel Butler
Edmund William Gosse 617
Christina Georgina Rossetti .
Algernon Charles Swinburne 600
William Wordsworth

266
John Dryden.

109
William Wordsworth

286
William Drummond

15
Henry Kirke White

391
Thomas Westwood

562
William Blake
Abraham
Cowley

68
William Shakespeare

39
William Shakespeare

58
William Wordsworth

275
William Wordsworth

284
James Montgomery

292
Thomas Campbell

355
Philip Bourke Marston

618

418
358

102

591

229

Pale, beyond porch and portal
Pansies, lilies, kingcups, daisies
Panting and pensive now she ranged alone
Pelion and Ossa flourish side by side
Phæbus, arise!
Pictured in memory's mellowing glass, how sweet
Piped the blackbird, on the beechwood spray
Piping down the valleys wild .
Poet and saint! to thee alone are giv'n
Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are
Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth
Possessions vanish, and opinions change
Praised be the art whose subtle power could stay
Prayer is the soul's sincere desire
Primeval hope, the Aonian muses say
Pure souls that watch above me from afar
Queen and huntress, chaste and fair
Rarely, rarely, comest thou
Read in these roses the sad story
Rear thou aloft thy standard. -- Spirit, rear
Reas'ning at every step he treads
Red rows the Nith, 'tween bank and brae
Remote, unfriended, melancholy, slow
“Rest, rest, perturbed Earth!
Rest! this little fountain runs

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Percy Bysshe Shelley
Thomas Carew
Henry Kirke White
William Cowper .
Allan Cunningham
Oliver Goldsmith
William Wordsworth
Bryan Waller Procter

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Retire; - the world shut out; — thy thoughts call home
Rhyme the rudder is of verses
Rich and rare were the gems she wore
Riches I hold in light esteem :
Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky
Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean - roll !
“Ruin seize thee, ruthless King!”
Sad happy race! soon raised and soon depressed
Sad is our youth, for it is ever going
Say, what is Honor? 'Tis the finest sense
Say, what is Taste, but the internal pow'rs
Scots, wha hae wi' Wallace bled
Seated one day at the organ
See, how the orient dew
See Lucifer like lightning fall
See through this air, this ocean, and this earth
Send home my long stray'd eyes to me
Shades of ev'ning close not o'er us ·
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Shall I, wasting in despair
She dwelt among the untrodden ways .
She is far from the land where her

young

hero sleeps
She is not fair to outward view
She looks upon his lips, and they are pale
She rose – she sprung - she clung to his embrace
She saw a sun on a summer sky
She sleeps amongst her pillows soft
She stood breast high amid the corn
She walks in beauty, like the night
She was a creature framed by love divine
She was a phantom of delight
She was a Queen of noble Nature's crowning
She's gone to dwell in heaven, my lassie
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more .
Signior Antonio, many a time and oft .
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea
Since our Country, our God -oh, my sire! .
Since there's no help, come let us kiss and part
Sing the old song, amid the sounds dispersing
Sing them upon the sunny hills.
Sleep, baby, sleep! what ails my dear
Sleep, little baby, sleep!
Sleep on, my mother! sweet and innocent dreams
Slow sinks, more lovely ere his race be run
So all day long the noise of battle roll'd
So dear to Heav'n is saintly chastity
So ended Saturn; and the God of the Sea
So forth issued the Seasons of the year
So on he fares, and to the border comes
Soe feeble is the thred that doth the burden stay
Soft you; a word or two before you go
Soldier, wake- the day is peeping ·
Some love is light and fleets away
Some say the soul's secure
Some to Conceit alone their taste confine.
Souls of poets dead and gone.
Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea!
Stars! your balmiest influence shed!
Stern daughter of the voice of God!
Still must my partial pencil love to dwell
Still to be neat, still to be drest
Stop, Mortal! Here thy brother lies
Strength too-thou surly, and less gentle boast
Strong Son of God, immortal Love
Sweet and low, sweet and low

PAGL.
Edward Young

123
Samuel Butler

102
Thomas Moore

368
Emily Brontë

569
Alfred Tennyson

543
George Gordon, Lord Byron 419
Thomas Gray

179
George Crabbe

223
Aubrey Thomas De Vere
William Wordsworth

289
Mark Akenside

166
Robert Burns.

245
Adelaide Anne Procter

585
Andrew Marvell .

104
John Keble

439
Alexander Pope

142
John Donne

18
Thomas Haynes Bayley
William Shakespeare

57
George Wither

62
William Wordsworth

265
Thomas Moore
Hartley Coleridge
William Shakespeare,

56
George Gordon, Lord Byron 421
James Hogg
Bryan Waller Procter

401
Thomas Hood

490
George Gordon, Lord Byron 430
Sir Henry Taylor

496
William Wordsworth

269
Hartley Coleridge
Allan Cunningham
Robert Burns

233
William Shakespeare

44
William Shakespeare

41
William Shakespeare
George Gordon, Lord Byron

431
Michael Drayton

12
Aubrey Thomas De Vere 561
Felicia Hemans

461
George Wither

61
Caroline Bowles (Mrs. Southey) 344
Mary Russell Mitford

399
George Gordon, Lord Byron 422
Alfred Tennyson

534
John Milton

100
John Keats

469
Edmund Spenser
John Milton

82
Sir Thomas Wyatt
William Shakespeare
Walter Scott
William Motherwell

482
Samuel Butler
Alexander Pope

129
John Keats

477
Thomas Moore

378
Percy Bysshe Shelley

442
William Wordsworth

273
Samuel Rogers

255
Ben Jonson

7
Ebenezer Elliott

385
Robert Blair

148
Alfred Tennyson

542
Alfred Tennyson

539

480
398

.

58

22

48
316

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Sweet Auburn! loveliest village of the plain
Sweet Auburn! parent of the blissful hour
Sweet bird, that sing'st away the early hours
Sweet daughter of a rough and stormy sire
Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright
Sweet Echo, sweeter nymph, that liv'st unseen
Sweet floweret, pledge o' meikle love
Sweet Highland Girl, a very shower,
Sweet is the rose, but grows upon a brere
Sweet is the ship that under sail
“Sweet is true love, tho’ given in vain, in vain
Sweet maid, if thou would'st charm my sight
Sweet nurslings of the vernal skies
Sweetest love, I do not go :
Swifter far than summer's flight .
Swiftly walk over the western wave
Take, O take those lips away
Tanagra! think not I forget
Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean
Tell me not, sweet, I am unkind
Tell me, on what holy ground
Tell me, thou soul of her I love
Tell thee truth, sweet; no.
That day I oft remembered, when from sleep
That day of wrath, that dreadful day
That stubborn crew
That which her slender waist confined
The Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold
The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne
The blessed damozel leaned out.
The breaking waves dash'd high
The bride she is winsome and bonny
The castled crag of Drachenfels .
The Chough and Crow to roost are gone .
The curfew tolls the knell of parting day
The dead abide with us! Though stark and cold
The evening weather was so bright and clear
The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew
The fountains mingle with the river
The glories of our birth and state
The gowan glitters on the sward
The half-seen memories of childish days
The harp that once through Tara's halls
The harp the monarch minstrel swept.
The heart of man, walk it which

way

it will
The hours are passing slow
The isles of Greece, the isles of Greece!
The keener tempests come: and fuming dun
The King had deem'd the maiden bright .
The lake is calm; and, calm, the skies
The lawns are bright, the paths are wide
The lifelong day Lord Marmion rode
The little flow'rs dropping their honey'd dew
The longer life the more offence.
The lopped tree in time may grow again .
The Lord my pasture shall prepare
The lovely purple of the noon's bestowing
The matron at her mirror, with her hand upon her brow
The midges dance aboon the burn
The mind that broods o'er guilty woes
The Minstrel-boy to the war is gone
The moon is bleached as white as wool
The moon is up, and yet it is not night
The more we live, more brief appear
The news frae Moidart cam' yestreen
The night was winter in his roughest mood

PAGE.
Oliver Goldsmith

182
Oliver Goldsmith

184
William Drummond

16
Mrs. Barbauld

217
George Herbert

65
John Milton

99
Robert Burns

241
William Wordsworth

370
Edmund Spenser

21
Charles Dibdin

227
Alfred Tennyson

546
Sir William Jones

219
John Keble

440
John Donne

17
Percy Bysshe Shelley

455
Percy Bysshe Shelley

443
William Shakespeare

55
Walter Savage Landor

353
Alfred Tennyson

540
Richard Lovelace

71
Samuel Taylor Coleridge . 324
James Thomson

153
Augusta Webster

607
John Milton

83
Walter Scott

297
Samuel Butler
Edmund Waller

64
George Gordon, Lord Byron

432
William Shakespeare

39
Dante Gabriel Rossetti

590
Felicia Hemans

459
Joanna Baillie

249
George Gordon, Lord Byron 413
Joanna Baillie

249
Thomas Gray

177
Mathilde Blind

615
John Keats

467
Samuel Taylor Coleridge 317
Percy Bysshe Shelley

450
James Shirley

33
Joanna Baillie
Aubrey Thomas De Vere.
Thomas Moore
George Gordon, Lord Byron
Sir Henry Taylor
Andrew Lang

боу
George Gordon, Lord Byron 425
James Thomson

149
Walter Scott

311
Owen Meredith

594
H. E. H. King

605
Walter Scott
Michael Drayton

13
Sir Thomas Wyatt
Robert Southwell

30
Joseph Addisor.

116
Letitia Elizabeth Landon .

497
Thomas Haynes Bayley
Robert Tannahill

331
George Gordon, Lord Byron 404
Thomas Moore

372
Jean Ingelow

592
George Gordon, Lord Byron 415
Thomas Campbell
Caroline Oliphant

257
William Cowper

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250
560
368
430
496

298

486

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362

202

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