Mapping the Mind: Domain Specificity in Cognition and Culture

Capa
What is the nature of human thought? A long dominant view holds that the mind is a general problem-solving device that approaches all questions in much the same way. Chomsky's theory of language, which revolutionized linguistics, challenged this claim, contending that children are primed to acquire some skills, such as language, in a manner largely independent of their ability to solve other sorts of apparently similar mental problems. In recent years, researchers in anthropology, psychology, linguistics and neuroscience have examined whether other mental skills are similarly independent. Many have concluded that much of human thought is "domain-specific." Thus, the mind is better viewed as a collection of cognitive abilities specialized to handle specific tasks than as a general problem solver. Mapping the Mind introduces a general audience to a domain-specificity perspective, by compiling a collection of essays exploring how several of these cognitive abilities are organized. This volume is appropriate as a reader for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in cultural psychology, psychological anthropology, developmental and cognitive psychology.
 

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Conteúdo

Toward a topography of mind An introduction to domain specificity
3
The origins of domain knowledge Biology and evolution
37
The modularity of thought and the epidemiology of representations
39
The organization of lexical knowledge in the brain Evidence from category and modalityspecific deficits
68
Origins of domain specificity The evolution of functional organization
85
The origins of domain knowledge Conceptual approaches
117
ToMM ToBy and Agency Core architecture and domain specificity
119
Moral belief Form versus content
149
Core domains versus scientific theories Evidence from systematics and ItzaMaya folkbiology
316
Essentialist beliefs in children The acquisition of concepts and theories
341
Domains across cultures and languages
367
First principles can support both universal and culturespecific learning about number and music
369
Cognitive constraints on cultural representations Natural ontologies and religious ideas
391
Universal and culturespecific properties of childrens mental models of the earth
412
Cognitive domains and the structure of the lexicon The case of emotions
431
Implications for education
453

Domainspecific knowledge and conceptual change
169
Is the acquisition of social categories based on domainspecific competence or on knowledge transfer?
201
The birth and nurturance of concepts by domains The origins of concepts of living things
234
Are domains theories?
255
The theory theory
257
Thinking by children and scientists False analogies and neglected similarities
294
Teachers models of childrens minds and learning
455
Situated rationalism Biological and social preparation for learning
474
Author index
495
Subject index
505
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