The Rudiments of Architecture and Building: For the Use of Architects, Builders, Draughtsmen, Machinists, Engineers and Mechanics

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John Bullock
H.C. Baird, 1865 - 468 Seiten

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Seite 264 - Westward, much nearer by south-west, behold Where on the ^Egean shore a city stands Built nobly, pure the air, and light the soil ; Athens, the eye of Greece, mother of arts And eloquence, native to famous wits Or hospitable, in her sweet recess, City or suburban, studious walks and shades ; See there the olive grove of Academe, Plato's retirement, where the Attic bird Trills her thick-warbled notes the summer long ; There flowery hill Hymettus, with the sound Of bees...
Seite 144 - And though in this respect the Venetians must be allowed extraordinary skill, yet even that skill, as they have employed it, will but ill correspond with the great style. Their colouring is not only too brilliant, but, I will venture to say, too harmonious, to produce that solidity, steadiness, and simplicity of effect, which heroic subjects require, and which simple or grave colours only can give to a work.
Seite 269 - High actions, and high passions best describing : Thence to the famous orators repair, Those ancient, whose resistless eloquence Wielded at will that fierce democratic, Shook the arsenal, and fulmined over Greece To Macedon and Artaxerxes...
Seite 143 - Grandeur of effect is produced by two different ways, which seem entirely opposed to each other. One is, by reducing the colours to little more than chiaroscuro, which was often the practice of the Bolognian schools; and the other, by making the colours very distinct and forcible, such as we see in those of Rome and Florence; but still, the presiding principle of both those manners is simplicity. Certainly, nothing can...
Seite 65 - The most splendid period of the Grecian history was between the sixth and fourth centuries before the Christian era, during the time of the wars that were carried on between the Persians and the principal states of Greece, and to which the greatest prosperity of the Athenians may be attributed : literature was cultivated, and the arts of architecture and sculpture, which were employed to ornament the city, were carried to a degree of excellence that has never been surpassed. Greece was conquered...
Seite 348 - Fig. 57. this roof are formed of planks bent round on templets to the proper curve, and kept from separating by iron straps, and also by the radiating struts which are in pairs, notched out so as to clip the rib between them. The principle of the roof is exceedingly good. The principals, wall-posts, and arched rib, form two triangles, firmly braced together, and...
Seite 199 - Some excellences bear to be united, and are improved by union ; others are of a discordant nature ; and the attempt to join them, only produces a harsh jarring of incongruent principles. The attempt to unite contrary excellences...
Seite 139 - ... and decay within our own observation, the same character of form is observable. In the vegetable kingdom, the infancy or youth of plants is, in general, distinguished by winding forms. The infancy and youth of animals is in the same manner, distinguished by winding or serpentine forms ; their mature and perfect age, by forms more direct and angular. In consequence of this...
Seite 274 - The temple of Theseus is regarded by the same authority as one of the most noble remains of the ancient magnificence of Athens, and the most perfect, if not the most beautiful, existing specimen of Grecian architecture. It is built of Pentelic marble ; the roof friezes and cornices still remain ; and so gently has the hand of time pressed upon this venerable edifice, that the first impression of the mind in beholding it, is doubt of its antiquity.
Seite 416 - ... rule moved in every direction on the plaster while it is soft, for giving a perfectly plane surface to the second coat of work. Floats are of three sorts : the hand float, which is a short rule that a man by himself may use ; the quirk float, which is used on or in angles ; and the Derby, which is of such a length as to require two men to use it. Plaster, float, and set is the term for three coats of plaster on laths. The first or pricking-up coat is of coarse stuff put on with a trowel to form...

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