The Works of Dr. Jonathan Swift ...

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G. Hamilton, J. Balfour, & L. Hunter, 1766
 

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Página 181 - He is without the sense of shame, or glory, as some men are without the sense of smelling ; and therefore, a good name to him, is no more than a precious ointment would be, to these.
Página 179 - I conceive their refinements were grounded upon reason, and that a little grain of the romance is no ill ingredient to preserve and exalt the dignity of human nature, without which it is apt to degenerate into everything that is sordid, vicious, and low.
Página 145 - His unusual dress and figure, when he was in London, never failed to draw after him a great crowd of boys and other young people, who constantly attended at his lodgings, and followed him with huzzas as he went to court or returned from it. As he was a man of humour, he would always thank them for their civilities, when he left them at the door to go...
Página 145 - London, never failed to draw after him a great crowd of boys, and other young people, who constantly attended at his lodgings, and followed him with huzzas, as he went to court, or returned from it. As he was a man of humour, he would always thank them for their civilities, when he left them at the door, to go in to the king ; and would let them know exactly at what hour he intended to come out again, and return to his lodgings.
Página 175 - It now passes for raillery to run a man down in discourse, to put him out of countenance, and make him ridiculous ; sometimes to expose the defects of his person or understanding; on all which occasions, he is obliged not to be angry, to avoid the imputation of not being able to take a jest.
Página 18 - from me vanity and lies ; give me neither poverty nor " riches, feed me with food convenient for me : left I be " full, and deny thee, and fay, Who is the Lord ? or left " I be poor, and fteal, and take the name of my God in " vain," On the fame thing is founded the advice of Solomon, with regard to the fin of fenfuality : Proverbs xxiii.
Página 175 - French, from whence we borrow the word, have a quite different idea of the thing, and so had we in the politer age of our fathers. Raillery was to say something that at first appeared a reproach or reflection, but by some turn of wit, unexpected and surprising, ended always in a compliment, and to the advantage of the person it was addressed to.
Página 172 - I rarely remember to have seen five people together where some one among them hath not been predominant in that kind, to the great constraint and disgust of all the rest.
Página 173 - Of such mighty importance every man is to himself, and ready to think he is so to others; without once making this easy and obvious reflection, that his affairs can have no more weight with other men, than theirs have with him; and how little that is, he is sensible enough.
Página 173 - ... just as they happened; but he would have his own way. Others make a vanity of telling their faults; they are the strangest men in the world; they cannot dissemble; they own it is a folly; they have lost abundance of advantages by it; but if you would give them the world...

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