Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity

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Allison Weir sets forth a concept of identity which depends on an acceptance of nonidentity, difference, and connection to others, defined as a capacity to participate in a social world. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational feminists" like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection to others, and poststructuralist feminists like Judith Butler, who view any identity as a repression of nonidentity or difference. Weir traces this conception of identity as domination back to Simone de Beauvoir's theories of the relation of self and other.
 

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Inhalt

in de Beauvoir Derrida and Jessica Benjamin
14
Luce Irigaray and the Critique of Phallogocentrism
90
From the Subversion of Identity
112
Resistance Must Finally Be Articulated
135
Conclusion
184
Bibliography
204
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Über den Autor (1996)

Writer Alison Weir received training to be a teacher with a concentration in history from the North Western Polytechnic. Before becoming a full-time writer, she worked as a civil servant and ran her own school for children with learning difficulties from 1991 to 1997. Her first book, Britain's Royal Families, was published in 1989. She is primarily a non-fiction author who writes about British royalty. Her books included The Six Wives of Henry VIII; Children of England; Eleanor of Aquitaine; Henry VIII: King and Court; Mary, Queen of Scots; and Isabella. Her first novel, Innocent Traitor, was published in 2006. In 2008 her second novel, The Lady Elizabeth, was published. Her works also include The Lady in the Tower - The Fall of Anne Boleyn (this book concerns the last four months of Anne Boleyn's life), The Captive Queen and A Dangerous Inheritance . She lives in Surrey, England.

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