Imagens da página
PDF
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

THERE have been poets that in verse display
The elemental forms of human passions:
Poets have been, to whom the fickle fashions
And all the wilful humours of the day
Have furnished matter for a polished lay:
And many are the smooth elaborate tribe
Who, emulous of thee, the shape describe,
And fain would every shifting hue pourtray
Of restless Nature. But, thou mighty Seer!
'Tis thine to celebrate the thoughts that make
The life of souls, the truths for whose sweet sake
We to ourselves and to our God are dear.
Of Nature's inner shrine thou art the priest,
Where most she works when we perceive her least.

SONNET

BY SIR THOMAS NO O N TAL FOUR D :

ON THE RECEPTION OF THE POET WORDSWORTH AT OXFORD,

O NEVER did a mighty truth prevail
With such felicities of place and time,
As in those shouts sent forth with joy sublime
From the full heart of England's Youth to hail
Her once neglected Bard within the pale
Of Learning's fairest Citadel! That voice,
In which the Future thunders, bids rejoice
Some who through wintry fortunes did not fail
To bless with love as deep as life, the name
Thus welcomed;—who, in happy silence share
The triumph; while their fondest musings claim
Unhoped-for echoes in the joyous air
That to their long-loved Poet's spirit bear
A nation's promise of undying fame.

If thou indeed derive thy light from Heaven,
Then, to the measure of that heaven-born light,
Shine, Poet, in thy place, and be content:—
The stars pre-eminent in magnitude,
And they that from the zenith dart their beams,
(Visible though they be to half the earth,
Though half a sphere be conscious of their brightness)
Are yet of no diviner origin,
No purer essence, than the one that burns,
Like an untended watch-fire, on the ridge
Of some dark mountain; or than those which seem
Humbly to hang, like twinkling winter lamps,
Among the branches of the leafless trees;
All are the undying offspring of one Sire:
Then, to the measure of the light vouchsafed,
Shine, Poet! in thy place, and be content.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

in anticipation of leaving School, 1786... Page 25

An Evening Walk, 1787-8–9................... Descriptive Sketches taken during a Pedestrian Tour among the Alps, 1791-2.......... - - - "fitten in very early Youth................ --Lines written while sailing in a Boat at Evening, 1789.............. * * * * * * * * * * * . . . . . Remembrance of Collins, composed upon the Thames near Richmond, 1789.............. lines les upon a Seat in a Yew-tree, 1795...... Guilt and Sorrow ; or, Incidents upon Salisbury Plain, 1793-4..... * * * * * * * * * * * * * . . . . . . . . . . . The Borderers. A Tragedy, 1795-6.......... Notes to Poems Written in Youth.............

P0EMS REFERRING TO CHILDHOOD.

My heart leaps up when I behold, 1804 ......... To a Butterfly, 1801....... - -

*ght, 1802......... *** * * * * * * * * * > . . . . . "hometeristics of a Child three Years old, 1811. Address to a Child, during a Boisterous Winter Evening, *................... The Mother's Return, 1807....... Alice Fell; or, Poverty, 1801... * * * * * * * * * * * > . . . o Gray; or, Solitude, 1799.... We are Seven, 1798........... Anecdote for Fathers, 1798... * * * * * * * * * * * . . . . . . Rural Architecture, *01 ................ #. Pet-lamb. A Pastoral, 1800. o: Shepherd-boys ; or, Dungeon-Ghyll T orce. A Pastoral, 1800...... - - - - o C. Six Years old, 1802.... - - - - - - o Natural Objects in calling forth and *"g the imagination; “arly Youth..... - - o - ion in Boyhood and “longest Day Add * * * * * * * * * * . . . . . . . . . - ressed to— he Sparrow's Nest, 1801. --- , 1817 le Norman Boy.... R. ors Dream. Sequel he W moreland Girl..... - o to Poems Referring to t

* * * * * * - - - - - -

[ocr errors]

- - - -

he Period of Child

- - -

POEMs FOUNDED ON

THE AFFECTIONS.

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

THE PERIOD OF

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

The Brothers, 1802.
Artegal and - --
Farewell Li

91 94 94

[ocr errors]

Notes to Poems Founded on the Affections..

Stanzas written in my Pocket-copy of Thomson's Castle of Indolence, 1802.................. 95 Louisa. After accompanying her on a Mountain Excursion, 1805........................... 96 Strange fits of passion have I known, 1799..... . 96 She dwelt among the untrodden ways, 1799 . . . . . 96 I travelled among unknown men, 1799.......... 96 Ere with cold beads of midnight dew, 1826...... 96 To 1824. . . . . . . ........................ 97 'Tis said, that some have died for love, 1800..... 97 The Forsaken .....................

A Complaint, 1806.......................... 98 To-, 1824............................... 98 Yes! thou art fair, yet be not moved........ . . . 98 How rich that forehead's calm expanse, 1824 . . . . 98 What heavenly smiles O Lady mine ........ . . 98 To • * “............................. 98 Lament of Mary Queen of Scots, on the Eve of a New Year. 1817......... - - - - - - - - - - . . . . . . 99 The Widow on Windermere side .............. 99 The Last of the Flock, 1798............ • . . . . . . 100 Repentance. A Pastoral Ballad, 1804.......... 101 The Affliction of Margaret —, 1804 ...... • . . . 101 The Cottager to her Infant, 1805............. • . . 102 The Sailor's Mother, 1800..... ... 102 The Childless Father, 1800......... ... 102 The Emigrant Mother 1802 ............ 103 Vaudracour and Julia, 1805............. ... 104 The Armenian Lady's Love, 1830 107 The Somnambulist, 1833 .......... • . . . . . . . . . . . 107 The Idiot Boy, 1798..................... • . . . . . 110 Michael. A Pastoral Poem, 1800....... • . . . . . . 115 The Russian Fugitive, 1830................ . . . . 119 Grace Darling, 1842........................... 123 The Complaint of a Forsaken Indian Woman, 1798. . . . . . . . . . . ............... • . . . . . . . . . . 124 Maternal Grief................................ 125 Loving and Liking. Irregular Verses, addressed to a Child, 1832........................... 126

The Redbreast. Suggested in a Westmoreland

Cottage, 1834............................. 127 Her Eyes are Wild, 1798...................... 197 . . . . . 129

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic]

POEMS OF THE IMAGINATION.

POEMS OF THE FANCY.

[merged small][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

169

170

170

-------------

The Haunted Tree. To , 1819. . . . . . . . ... 171

Written in March, while resting on the Bridge at

the foot of Brother's Water, 1801 .......... 171

Gipsies, 1807 ----------------. ... . . . . 171

Beggars, 1802--------------------- ... . . . . . . . . 172

Sequel to the Foregoing, 1817..... -------- . . . . . 172

Ruth, 1799 --------------------.

Laodamia, 1814----------------- --

The Triad, 1828 ----------------.............. 177

Lyre though such power do in thy magic live ... 179

A Jewish Family, 1828........................ 180

Weak is the will of man, his judgment blind.... 180

Resolution and Independence, 1807......... . . . . 180

The Thorn, 1798------------.......

Hart-leap Well, 18 -------- ... 184

Song at the Feast of"Brougham Castle, upon the

Restoration of Lord Clifford, the Shepherd,

1807--------------------....... ... 186

Yes, it was the mountain Echo, 1806. ... 188

To a Sky-lark, 1825. -------------------------. 188

It is no Spirit who from Heaven hath flown, 1803 188

French Revolution as it appeared to Enthusiasts

at its commencement, 1805................. 188

Gold and Silver Fishes in a Vase, 1829.......... 189

Liberty (Sequel to the foregoing), .............. 189

The Pass of Kirkstone, 1817.... ... 191

Suggested by a Picture of the Bird of Paradise... 192

Airey-force Valley .................. .......... 192

The Cuckoo-Clock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192

Lines composed a few miles above Tintern Abbey,

on revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a

Tour, July 13, 1798. 1798.. ......... 193

Peter Bell.- A Tale........................ 194

The Egyptian MAID, or Romance of the Water

Lily, 1830 -------------------------------- 206

The Simplon Pass, 1799....................

An Evening Ode, composed upon an Evening of

Extraordinary Splendour and Beauty, 1818. 211

To the Clouds................... ... . . 212

On the Power of Sound 1828................... 213

------------

-------

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
« AnteriorContinuar »