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Blasting-powder and tools were immediately procured; but, before they could make any fresh essay, the ground began to quake under their feet, and the workmen got away in time with great difficulty:

They were no sooner landed safely on the pit's edge than, with a noise resembling the roar of a volcano, the whole mass of iron rock shot' up and flew out with inconceivable velocity into mid air.

Whither it went no one knew, for it was never seen to fall to earth. Fragments of half-consumed paper descended in showers; which, upon being handled, flew into dust, not before they were carefully examined, however, and pronounced upon competent authority to be the calcined remnants of BACKAWAY BONDS!

And the men stood by in expectant terror; but I soon reassured them, and ordered in a barrel of beer to revive them. While they had turned to drink, I pronounced the name of Birdie, and to the astonishment of the workmen, the head-gardener, and the assembled spectators, the earth began to close and fill up again, and a lovely fountain was soon playing on the spot in jets of rose-water, scattering its delicious fragrance in their midst, while strains of heavenly music enchanted them, as each hardworking labourer stood leaning over his pick or shovel for hours, just as he was when it began—unable to move or stir; and there they were when I left. It was such a picture! Perhaps the beer added to the warmth of their admiration,-it would have done to mine, had I been able to contain so healthful and refreshing a beverage! And I saw no drawn faces, no livid looks, and but little to distract and worry them,—and there were no Saints to be seen anywhere; and if they got a little jaded by honest toil, they at once resorted to Birdie's• flower-gardenBankers, Merchants, Clerks, Mechanics, all -- and there they bless the name of Birdie !

And whenever the people pray for the reigning Monarch of the Old Countree in the churches of the land, they do not forget to thank Him for the Queen who reigned in those days, coupling Her Name with that of Birdie! Why, sir, those two live as much now in the hearts of the people as they did then !

All things else have faded and passed away, but such hearts never die, and that is very, very long ago !

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CHAPTER XVII.

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*When age chills the blood, when our pleasures are past,

For years fleet away with the wings of the dove
The dearest remembrance will still be the last,

Our sweetest memorial the first kiss of love.'—BYRON. Now, although their loves tired not, becoming, indeed, fresher and stronger every day, yet I thought I perceived, in one of them at least, the veriest shadow of a bit of curiosity.

"You see, dear old boy,' said Birdie to Ralph, when they were sitting together after an unusually busy day at his post,

-for telegram after telegram had come in from Earth, and he had been replying to them- you see, we have been here now,oh, ever so many thousands of years, and yet we have neverShe paused, and Ralph gazed upon her only for a second, for he at once divined her thoughts.

My wee little one,' he said, pressing her fondly to him, his children all looking on in wonderment, 'indeed we have !'

'Have we ? she asked, with a look of indescribable emotion and wonder.

Starting up and trembling violently, she looked around her with visible emotion depicted on her wondrous features, then suddenly exclaimed, “Why so we have, I never thought of that ! He is here-here-here-everywhere; of course He is ! and I not to have known that! Oh, Ralph, Ralph !' exclaimed she, falling into his outstretched arms, “indeed He is ! we see Him every moment of our lives, feel His sweet presence everywhere, and just as we act, so—?

· So what, Birdie ? he asked.
"Ah, you know !' she replied; "and fancy me preaching to you!'
'I love your sermons, Birdie.'
They're never too long, old boy.'

They're never long enough for me. Hullo, there's another fire-cloud !'

And Ralph was at his post in a moment. When he returned he told her that in addition to the business part' there was a short account flashed from Earth of a man having lost a thousand pound

All at once her bright, gay look was gone. Perceiving the cause, he said, embracing her, "Don't shiver so, darling; it isn't here, you know.'

Go on, dear old boy,' she faltered, looking him full in the face, but changing colour every moment.

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"A thousand pou—oh, you little

He could not finish. She interposed with downcast eyes, and implored him with a slight tremble in her accent, 'Go on.'

He continued, '-nd bank no— Birdie, love, it--'

Do go on, old boy,' she besought him, shaking like a leaf at the mention of the word 'note.'

· Yes, dear Ralph, well?' she now said with a little confidence.

• You won't let me, love; you shiver so violently. Well, he put a notice up thus, “Lost, a thou—"oh! and all the rest. “Whoever will bring the same to the landlord of the Hog and Sparrow will receive best thanks."

'Capital ! shrieked Birdie, and the merriment of the youngsters knew no bounds.

· Yes, but the best's to come; within an hour it was brought by a common, or rather an uncommon labourer, with such an honest smile on his face, and he was so delighted, and told the Hog and Sparrow's landlord that it was the happiest day of his life to feel that he hail been trusted, and this was at Fopville. The lines the youngsters were singing last night are commemorative of an event which happened there.

"Get little Reggy to repeat them, said she, will you, Ralph ? for I was absent.'

Little Reginald Ralph Birdie Osborne, who, in company with his younger brother, Alfred Ernest Birdie Osborne, was about to mount his pony for a ride together over to Lord Allan's, immediately responded to the call, and gave them the following version, which was in the main a correct one. Clearing his juve. nile throat he began :

WITHOUT THE LORD. * A girl I met in years bygone,

Who spoke to me about "the word ;"
'Twas night ; said she-we were alone-

“I fear you are without the Lord.'
“Without !" I said ; " then pray who's with ?”

Ah! now I'd struck a tender chord,
As sighing, all her kin and kith

She thought might be “ without the Lord.”
"Now list !" I cried, “ I'm much too hum

To think that I can p'raps afford
To be without! Sure I should tumble

In saddest scrapes without the Lord.'
“ So tell me, please, at your own pace-

Nor cut it short; I sha'n't be bored
What I should do t'avoid disgrace,

For I'd not rest without the Lord.''

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Said she, “On Friday next there'll be

Long prayers to Him-by all adored ; So come, and then you'll quickly see

How loud they groan 'without the Lord.'”
“A
prayer-meeting's a thing I hate-

To see each creature looking toward
They know not what,” I said. “ 'Twould sate

And shunt me quite 'without the Lord.'' “ You hate the meet-" “Not meet of hounds,"

I quickly cried ; " be well assured.” “ You naughty man !" says she. Oh, zounds!

What I now again without the Lord !? Our .meet' is jolly-yours is sad ;

I'm triste enough ! now ain't I broad ?She laugh'd, then sigh'd, “ Come, you're too bad !

You wouldn't die 'without the Lord'?“ Whose Lord ?” I cried in savage haste;

“Faith! to my own I'm stoutly moor'd ! Your sickly one's not to my taste.

Now say, am I'without the Lord'?" She wept ! “ You are a radical !"

Crying's an art that always floor'd Strong natures! Quick fid-fadical,

I then became “ without the Lord.” As soon rebell'd—“Now just you try

A month with mine! and if allured You don't become, and cease to cry

In doleful tones' without the Lord,' I'll eat my hat-your bonnet-you

Your Lord and all-if not too awed !” She wouldn't-sobbing, “ 'Tis too true,

You do exist' without the Lord !"" "Now, dear one, list ! hear once for all"

Straight up she look'd, nor longer jaw'dI smiling asked, “D' you like your Paul ?

Yet long he was without the Lord !' We go two ways about one thing—"

Just then a sober jackdaw caw'd, “By hook or crook, 'tish de shame shing,

You neisher are wishout de Lord !'" "My Lord,” I urged, “is not confined

To churches-brick'd, or built with board ! He dwells in those of spirit kind ;

Now say, am I'without the Lord'?
He dwells in those whose love-so rare-

Urges them on to seek reward
Not in Earth's gay and thoughtless Fair.

Now say, am I'without the Lord'?

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Who was the young wr gallopped off to call upok ta madly as they went along

Not knowing, care
strangers. She was sem
doubt; but I have si
enlightenment,' repied

'I thought I shund some
recital,' said Birdie : 20cmais
for keeping his counteina 1
laughter; and as to Alfrem til
into convulsions! What imar uns
days!

'I had a good langh over fuar sa

replied.

And the boys fully see ances sentiment animating and permeatinę toros

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