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Volume any instructions in the art of Elocution, or to direct the accent or intonation of the student by the abundant use of italics or of large capitals. The principal, if not the only secrets of good reading are, to speak slowly, to articulate distinctly, to pause judiciously, and to feel the subject so as, if possible, "to make all that passed in the mind of the Author to be felt by the Auditor." Good oral example upon these points is far better for the young Student than the most elaborate written system.

A series of Educational Works, in other departments of study, similarly illustrated, and at a price equally small, is in preparation. Among the earliest to be issued, may be enumerated a Sequel and Companion to the Illustrated London Reading Book, designed for a more advanced class of Students, and consisting of extracts from English Classical Authors, from the earliest periods of English Literature to the present day, with a copious Introductory Chapter upon the arts of Elocution and Composition. The latter will include examples of Style chosen from the beauties of the best Authors, and will also point out by similar examples the Faults to be avoided by all who desire to become, not simply good Readers and Speakers, but elegant Writers of their native language.

Amongst the other works of which the series will be composed, may be mentioned, profusely Illustrated Volumes upon Geographical, Astronomical, Mathematical, and General Science, as well as works essential to the proper training of the youthful mind.

January, 1850.

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CONTENT S.

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ABBEY, Account of Strata Florida

Adam and Eve in Paradise

Alfred, Anecdote of King

Character o King

Angling, Lines on

Antioch, The Siege of

Artillery Tactics

Athens, Present Appearance of

Attock, Description of the Fort of

BACON, Remarks on Lord

Balloons, Account of

Baltic, Battle of the

Beetle, The

Bell, The Founding of the

Bible, Value of the

Birds, Appropriateness of the Songs of

Bower-Birds, Description of the

Bridges, Account of Tubular Railway

Bunyan's Wife, Anecdote of

Bushmen, Account of the

CÆSAR, Character of Julius

Canada, Intense Cold of

Canary, Account of the

Charity

Chatterton, Lines by

Cheerfulness, Description of

China, Account of the Great Wall of

Christian Freedom

Clarendon, Account of Lord

Cobra di Capello, Description of the

Condors, Account of

Cruelty to Animals, Wickedness of

Culloden Battle-field, Description of

Cyprus, Description of

DANISH Encampment, Account of a

Deity, Omniscience of the

Dogs, A Chapter on

Dove, Return of the

EDWARD VI., Character of

Elegy in a Country Churchyard

Elizabeth (Queen), at Tilbury Fort

Envy, Wickedness of

FAITH's Guiding Star

Farewell

Filial Love

Fortitude

Fox, Description of the Long-eared

Frederick of Prussia and his Page

GAMBIER Islanders, Account of

Gelert

Gentleness, Character of

Goldsmith, Remarks on the Style of

Goliah Aratoo, Description of the

Greece, Isles of

The Shores of

Gresham, Account of Sir Thomas

Grief, The First

Grouse, Description of the
HAGAR and Ishmael, Story of
Hampden, Account of John
Hercules, The Choice of
Holly Bough
Hope
IGUANA, Description of the
Industry, Value of
Integrity
Ivy in the Dungeon
“Jack the Giant Killer," Origin of
Jalapa, Description of
Jewels, Description of the Crown
Joppa, Account of

(MIDDLETON) 117
(SIR F. HEAD) 150

49
(PBIOR) 178

195
CADDISON) 92

98
(Pollock) 214

191
134

68

(JENYNS) 60

(HIGHLAND NOTE-BOOK) 104

10

86

(ADDISON)

69

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39

(Mackaï) 133

(BURNET) 77

(GRAY) 201

(ENGLISH HISTORY) 65

(DR. JOHNSON) 73

(ELIZA COOK) 64

(BARTON) 248

(DR. DODD) 229
(BLAIR) 52

81
(BEAUTIES OF HISTORY) 18

213

.. (W. SPENCER) 96

(BLAIR) 197

(CAMPBELL) 139

4

(BYRON) 108

(BYRON) 187

154

(MRS. HEMANS) 58

127

140

226

(TATLER) 162

(MACKAY) 142

(CAMPBELL) 209

199

(BLAIR) 50

(DR. DODD) 212

(MACKAY) 53

(CARLYLE) 14

66

218

21

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158

54

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(GAY)

.

Jordan, Description of the River
Jordan's Banks
Juggernaut, Account of the Car of
KAFFIR Chiefs, Account of

Letier-carrier, Account of
Kangaroo, Description of the
Knowledge, on the Attainment of
LEOPARD, Description of the Black
Lighthouse, Description of Hartlepool
Lilies
MANGOUSTE, Description of the
Mariana
Mariners of England ::
Martello Towers, Account of
Mary's (Queen) Bower, at Chatsworth
Microscope, Revelations of the
Midnight Thoughts
Mill-stream, Lines oil &
Music, Remarks on
NAPOLEON, Character of
Nature and its Lord

The Order of

Naval Tactics

Nests of Birds, Construction of

Niagara, Account of the Falls of

Nightingale and Glowworm

OLIVE, Description of the

Othello's History

Owls, Account of

(Two) and the Sparrow

PALM-TREE, Account of the

Lines on a

Parrot, Lines on a

Patmos, Description of the Isle of

Paul and Virginia, Supposed Tombs of

Pekin, Description of

Peter the Hermit Preaching the First Crusade

Poetry, Rise of, among the Romans

Polar Regions, Description of the

Pompeii, Account of

Poor, The Afflicted

Pyramid Lake, Account of the

RAILWAY Tunnels, Difficulties of

Rainbow, Account of a Lunar

Rattlesnake, Account of the

Rome, Lines on

Rookery, Dialogue about a

SARDIS, Description of

Schoolboy's Pilgrimage

Seasons

Shakspeare, Remarks on

Sheep, Description of Thibetan

Sierra Nevada, Description of the

Siloam, Account of the Pool of

Sleep, Henry IV.'s Soliloquy on

Sloth, Description of the

Smyrna, Description of

Staffa, Description of

Stag, The hunted

Starling, Story of a

St. Bernard, Account of the Dogs of

St. Cecilia, Ode to

Stepping-stones, The

Stony Cross, Description of

Stream, the Nameless

Study, Remarks on

Sun Fish, Capture of a

Sydney, Generosity of Sir Philip

TABOR, Description of Mount

Tapir, Description of the

Telegraph, Account of the Electric

Time, What is it?

Turkish Customs

Tyre, the Siege of

UNA and the Lion

Universe, Grandeur he

VOCABULARY

WATERLOO, Description of the Field of

Winter Thoughts

Writing, On Simplicity in

PAGE

51

(BYRON) 52

8

165
236

176
(DE. WATTS) 155

178

210

(MRS. HEMANS) 44

102

(TENNISON) 113
(CAMPBELL) 234

182

230

(DR. MANTELL) 47

(YOUNG) 246

(MARY Howitt) 72

(USHER) 244

(GENERAL FOY) 30

16
(POPE) 190

(STURM)

(SIR JAMES ALEXANDER) 120

(COWPER) 46

74

(SHAKSPEARE) 228

193
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26

37

(MRS. HEMANS) 38

(CAMPBELL) 6

129

100

2

(POPULAR DELUSIONS) 62

(SPENCE) 115

215

44

(CRABBE) 245

136

168

208
(F. T. BUCKLAND) 12

(ROGERS) 33
(EVENINGS AT HOME) 34

180

(JANE TAYLOR) 1

(THOMSON) 238

130

156

(FREMONT'S TRAVELS) 124

148
(SHÄKSPEARE) 200

123

196
(HIGHLAND NOTE-BOOK) 89

(SIR W. Scott) 78

(STERNE) 7
(THE MENAGERIES) 19

(DRYDEN) 145
(WORDSWORTH) 17

94
(MACKAY) 88

(LORD BACON) 186

(CAPTAIN BEDFORD, R.N.) 170

(BEAUTIES OF HISTORY) 18

83

22

(SIR F. HEAD) 206

(REV. J. MARSDEN) 223

184

(LANGHORNE'S PLUTARCH) 119

(SPENSER) 84

(ADDISON) 142

249

24

(THOMSON) 149

(HUME) 224

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THE ILLUSTRATED

LONDON

R E A D I N G

Β Ο Ο Κ.

THE SCHOOLBOY'S PILGRIMAGE.

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OTHING could be more easy and agreeable than my condition when I was first summoned to set out on the road to learning, and it was not without letting fall a few ominous tears that I took the first step. Several companions of my own age accompanied me in the outset, and we travelled pleasantly together a good

part of the way. We had no sooner entered upon our path, than we were accosted by three diminutive strangers. These we presently discovered to be the advance-guard of a Lilliputian army, which was seen advancing towards us in battle array.

Their forms were singularly grotesque: some were striding across the path, others standing with their arms a-kimbo; some hanging down their heads, others quite erect; some standing on one leg, others on two; and one, strange to say, on three; another had his arms crossed, and one was

remarkably crooked; some were very slender, and others as broad as they were long. But, notwithstanding this diversity of figure, when they were all marshalled in line of battle, they had

very orderly and regular appearance. Feeling disconcerted by their numbers, we were presently for sounding a retreat; but, being urged forward by our guide, we soon mastered the three who led the van, and this gave us spirit to encounter the main army, who were conquered to a man before we left the field. We had scarcely taken breath after this victory, when, to our no small dismay, we descried a strong reinforcement of the enemy, stationed on the opposite side. These were exactly equal in number to the former army, but vastly superior in size and stature; they were, in fact, a race of giants, though of the same species with the others, and were capitally accoutred for the onset. Their appearance discouraged us greatly at first, but we found their strength was not proportioned to their size ; and, having

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acquired much skill and courage by the late engagement, we soon succeeded in subduing them, and passed off the field in triumph. After this we were perpetually engaged with small bands of the enemy, no longer extended in line of battle, but in small detachments of two, three, and four in company.

We had some tough work here, and now and then they were too many for us. Having annoyed us thus for a time, they began to form themselves into close columns, six or eight abreast; but we had now attained so much address, that we no longer found them formidable.

After continuing this route for a considerable way, the face of the country suddenly changed, and we began to enter upon a vast succession of snowy plains, where we were each furnished with a certain light weapon, peculiar to the country, which we flourished continually, and with which we made many light strokes, and some desperate ones. The waters hereabouts were dark and brackish, and the snowy surface of the plain was often defaced by them. Probably, we were now on the borders of the Black Sea. These plains we travelled across and across for many a day.

Upon quitting this district, the country became far more dreary: it appeared nothing but a dry and sterile region, the soil being remarkably hard and slatey. Here we saw many curious figures, and we soon found that the inhabitants of this desert were mere ciphers. Sometimes they appeared in vast numbers, but only to be again suddenly diminished.

Our road, after this, wound through a rugged and hilly country, which was divided into nine principal parts or districts, each under a different governor ; and these again were reduced into endless subdivisions. Some of them we were obliged to decline. It was not a little puzzling to perceive the intricate ramifications of the paths in these parts. Here the natives spoke several dialects, which rendered our intercourse with them very perplexing. However, it must be confessed that every step we set in this country was less fatiguing and more interesting. Our course at first lay all up hill; but when we had proceeded to a certain height, the distant country, which is most richly variegated, opened freely to our view.

I do not mean at present to describe that country, or the different stages by which we advance through its scenery. Suffice it to say, that the journey, though always

arduous, has become more and more pleasant every stage; and though, after

years

of travel and labour, we are still very far from the Temple of Learning, yet we have found on the way more than enough to make us thankful to the kindness of the friends who first set us on the path, and to induce us to go forward courageously and rejoicingly to the end of the journey.

Jane Taylor.

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PEKIN. Pekin, or Peking, a word which in Chinese means "Northern Capital," has been the chief city of China ever since the Tartars were expelled, and is the residence of the Emperor. The tract of country on which it stands is sandy and barren ; but the Grand Canal is well adapted for the purpose of feeding its vast population with the produce of more fertile provinces and districts. A very large portion of the centre of the part of Pekin called the Northern City is occupied by the Emperor with his palaces and

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