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than any other man of his own or of any other time, Mr. Lincoln had but one character and one mode of action, in public and private affairs.

It is the purpose of this work, so far as possible, to facilitate this inquiry. Every public speech, message, letter, or document of any sort from his pen, so far as accessible, will be found included in its pages. These documents, with the narrative by which they are accompanied, may, it is hoped, aid the public in understanding aright the character and conduct of the most illustrious actor, in the most important era, of American history.

ILLUSTRATIONS.

1. PORTRAIT OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN, engraved by A. H. RITCHIB

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& PAC-SIMILE OF PRESIDENT LINCOLNS LETTER TO MR. RAYMOND .589, 590

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CHAPTER VIII.

THE REGULAR SESSION OF CONGRESS, DECEMBER, 1861.—THE MESSAGE.-

DEBATES, ETO.

Meeting of Congress.-President's Message.—Disposition of Congress. —

Slavery in Territories and District of Columbia.—Proposed Aid to Eman-

cipation by Slave States.—The Debate in Congress. The President and

General Hunter.—The Border Stato Representatives.The Border State

Reply.—The Finances.--Tho Confiscation Bill.-The Prosident's Action

and Opinions.—Tho President's Message.—Message in Regard to Mr.

Cameron.-The President and his Cabinet.-Close of the Session of Con-

gress.—The President's Letter to Mr. Greeley.-The President and the

Chicago Convention.—Proclamation of Emancipation....

Pago 212

CHAPTER IX.

THE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION OF 1862.THE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL

M'CLELLAN.

General McClellan succeeds McDowell.-The President's Order for an Ad-

vance.-The Movement to the Peninsula.—Rebel Evacuation of Manas-
sas.-

Arrangements for the Peninsular Movement.--The President's
Letter to General McClellan.-The Rebel Strength at Yorktown.—The

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