American Literature and the Destruction of Knowledge: Innovative Writing in the Age of Epistemology

Capa
Duke University Press, 1991 - 391 páginas
In this challenging work, Ronald E. Martin analyzes the impulse of major nineteenth- and twentieth-century American writers to undermine not only their inherited paradigms of literary and linguistic thought but to question how paradigms themselves are constructed. Through analyses of these writers, as well as contemporaneous scientists, mathematicians, philosophers, and visual artists, American Literature and the Destruction of Knowledge creates a panoramic view of American literature over the past 150 years and shows it to be a crucial part of the great philosophical changes of the period.
The works of Melville, Emerson, Whitman, and Dickinson, followed by Crane, Frost, Pound, Stein, Hemingway, Dos Passos, Aiken, Stevens, and Williams, are examined as part of a cultural current that casts doubt on the possibility of knowledge itself. The destruction of concepts, of literary and linguistic forms, was for these writers a precondition for liberating the imagination to gain more access to the self and the real world. As part of the exploration of this cultural context, literary and philosophical realisms are examined together, allowing a comparison of their somewhat different objectives, as well as their common epistemological predicament.

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Conteúdo

The Destruction of Knowledge in the Prescientific
1
Science and the Knowledge of Knowing
65
Realisms in a Relativistic World
101
Nonreflexive Perception
121
The Revolution in Visual Arts
145
The American Writer in the Age of Epistemology
175
The Discipline
208
The Mind
231
Thinking a World Without Thought
270
Actuality Montage the Real Event and
311
Notes
353
Bibliography
372
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