David Levy's Guide to Observing Meteor Showers

Capa
Cambridge University Press, 2008 - 128 páginas
Meteors occur when a meteoroid, a speck of dust in space, enters the Earth's atmosphere. The heat generated when this happens causes the surrounding air to glow, resulting in 'shooting stars'. During the most spectacular meteor storms larger particles give rise to fireballs and firework-like displays! Meteors are a delightful observing field - they do not require a telescope, and they can be seen on any clear night of the year, even in bright twilight. It was the sight of a single meteor that inspired David Levy to go into astronomy, and in this book he encourages readers to go outside and witness these wonderful events for themselves. This book is a step-by-step guide to observing meteors and meteor showers. Any necessary science is explained simply and in clearly understandable terms. This is a perfect introduction to observing meteors, and is ideal for both seasoned and budding astronomers.
 

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Conteúdo

1 July 4 1956
1
2 What is a meteor?
5
3 Some historical notes
10
4 Small rocks and dust in space
18
5 Observing meteors
27
6 Recording meteors
38
7 A New Year gift the Quadrantids
48
8 The Lyrids an April shower
53
12 Tears of St Lawrence Perseid trails and trials
72
13 The August Pavonids
77
14 The Orionids
81
15 The Taurids
86
16 The Leonids
90
17 The Geminids
96
18 The Ursids
100
19 A catalog of meteor showers throughout the year
103

9 The Eta Aquarids
58
10 The Omicron Draconids continued
63
11 The Delta Aquarids
68
Appendix
125
Index
126
Direitos autorais

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Sobre o autor (2008)

David H. Levy is one of the most successful comet discoverers in history. He has discovered 22 comets, nine of them using his own backyard telescopes. Together with Eugene and Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California he discovered Shoemaker-Levy 9, the comet that collided with Jupiter in 1994 producing the most spectacular explosions ever witnessed in the solar system. He is involved with the Jarnac Comet Survey, and Science Editor for Parade magazine, and contributing editor for Sky and Telescope. He has been awarded five honorary doctorates, and asteroid 3673 (Levy) was named in his honor. His other recent books include David Levy's Guide to Observing and Discovering Comets and David Levy's Guide to Variable Stars (Cambridge University Press).

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