The North-western Monthly: A Magazine Devoted to University Extension and to the Problems of Education, Band 7

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Seite 119 - ... too bright, nor good, for human nature's daily food, it is fitted in all its functions for the perpetual comfort and exalting of the heart, for the soothing it and purifying it from its dross and dust. Sometimes gentle, sometimes capricious, sometimes awful, never the same for two moments together ; almost human in its passions, almost spiritual in its tenderness, almost divine in its infinity...
Seite 160 - And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee ; nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you.
Seite 177 - And what is so rare as a day in June? Then, if ever, come perfect days; Then heaven tries the earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays : Whether we look, or whether we listen, We hear life murmur, or see it glisten ; Every clod feels a stir of might, An instinct within it that reaches and towers, And, groping blindly above it for light, Climbs to a soul in grass and flowers...
Seite 57 - Perfect taste is the faculty of receiving the greatest possible pleasure from those material sources which are attractive to our moral nature in its purity and perfection.
Seite 163 - Assembly and the authority thereof, that the conferring of baptisme doth not alter the condition of the person as to his bondage or freedom...
Seite 192 - Go out, in the spring-time, among the meadows that slope from the shores of the Swiss lakes to the roots of their lower mountains. There, mingled with the taller gentians and the white narcissus, the grass grows deep and free ; and as you follow the winding mountain paths, beneath...
Seite 261 - I'll tell you what that means. It's a dreadful picture, isn't it ? But I can't help looking at it. That old woman in the water's a witch ; they've put her in to find out whether she's a witch or no, and if she swims she's a witch, and if she's drowned — and killed, you know — she's innocent, and not a witch, but only a poor, silly old woman. But what good Vvould it do her then, you know, when she was drowned ? Only, I suppose, she'd go to heaven, and God would make it up to her.
Seite 192 - ... heaps, filling all the air with fainter sweetness, — look up towards the higher hills, where the waves of everlasting green roll silently into their long inlets among the shadows of the pines ; and we may, perhaps, at last know the meaning of those quiet words of the 147th Psalm, " He maketh grass to grow upon the mountains.
Seite 134 - ... Roughly speaking, it took a century of Indian fighting and forest felling for the colonial settlements to expand into the interior to a distance of about a hundred miles from the coast. Indeed, some stretches were hardly touched' in that period. This conquest of the nearest wilderness in the course of the seventeenth century and in the early years of the eighteenth, gave control of the maritime section of the nation and made way for the new movement of westward expansion which I propose to discuss....
Seite 192 - ... from the shores of the Swiss lakes to the roots of their lower mountains. There, mingled with the taller gentians and the white narcissus, the grass grows deep and free ; and as you follow the winding mountain paths, beneath arching boughs all veiled and dim with...

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