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Mr. Dundas then moved, That a Precedent be read for pafsing a Bill, in its several stages, through the House, in one day.

A Precedent was accordingly read.

The Speaker said, that it was not usual, except upon urgent occasions, to pass a Bill with such promptitude.

Mr. Dundas now moved for leave to bring in a Bill for the better administration of Justice in India, and for preventing the lending of Money to the Native Princes.

Sir John Sinclair faid a few words against paffing a Bill with such speed.

Mr. Baker opposed the Motion.
Leave was given to bring in the Bill.

The Bill was brought in, read a first and second time, and committed.

In the Committee Mr. Baker moved, that the period after which Judges should be entitled to Pensions ihould be extended to Ten Years.

After some conversation, it was settled that the period should be Seven Years.

, The Bill was then read a third time, passed, and ordered to the Lords.

Mr. Dent gave notice, that early in the next Session he should move for leave to bring in a Bill to regulate the roads; amongst the regulations he meant to propose was, that at each end of every village, the Trustees of the roads should be obliged to put up, in some conspicuous place, the name of the village, and that some regulations Thould be proposed respecting weighing engines, by which one hundred thouíand a-year might be added to the revenue. Adjourned.

HOUSE OF LORDS.

Thursday, July 20. As soon as his Majesty was leated upon the Throne, a Melfage was sent to the House of Commons, commanding the immediate attendance of the House.

The Speaker, attended by a considerable number of Members, accordingly appeared at the Bar of the House, and addessed his Majesty in a speech, in which he noticed the measures adopted by the Commons to preserve internal peace and tranquillity, and the unusually large Supplies that had been granted, which he trusted would be applied with a strict and vigilant economy. He concluded by expreffing a firm reliance upon the wisdom and benevolence of his Majesty. The Speaker then presented several Bills, to which he requested his Majesty's Royal Aflent.

After the Royal Allent had been given to the several Bills upon the Table, his Majelty delivered the foilowing most Graci. ous Speech :

" diyMy Lords and Gent!, men, I cannot put an End to this Sefion of Parliament without returning you my inost finere and cordial Thanks for the ijs duity and Zeal with wich yout have applied yourselves to the important Objects which have required your Attention, and for the Wisdom and Firmness which you have manifested in the new and diffi ult Emergencies for which you have had to provide.

I must particularly express the jujt Sense I entertain of the falutary and effectual Provisions which you made for strengthening 'the Means of National Defence; and the Measures adopted for obviating the Inconveniencies which were to be apprehended to Crea dit, from the temporary Suspension of Payments in Cash by the Bank; as well as of the Promotitude, Vigour, and Effect with which you afforded Me your Allistance and Support in suppressing the daring and treasonable Mutiny which broke out in a Part of My Fleet; and in counteracting fo d'angerous and pernicious an Example.

I have the Satisfaction to acquaint you, that, finie the Aiceffion of the present Emperor of Russia, the Cominercial Engagements between the two Countries have been renewed, in such a Manner as will, I doubt not, materially conduce to their mutual Interests.

« Gentlemen of the House of Cominons, " I must return you my particular Thanks for the liberal and extensive Provision which you have made for the various Exigen:ies of the Public Service, and while I lament the N: esity which increased them to fo large an dingunt, it is a Confolation to Me to obferve the Attention you employed in distributing the heavy Burides, which they occafionéd, in such a vower as to render their Press fure as little fevere as possible to My People.

My Lords and Gentlemen, « The Issue of the important Negotiation in which I am engaged is yet uncertain; biit, whatever may be the Event, nothing will have been wanting on My Part to bring it to a fucis ful Termination, on such Conditions as may be consistent with the Secu

rity, Honour, and effential Interejts of Vy Dominions. In the mean Time, nothing can lo much tend to forward the Attrinment of Peace, as the Continuan e of that Ziai, Exertion, and public Spirit, of which Aly Suljetts have givin such conspicuous and honourable Proofs, and of which the Perfeverance and Firmness of Parliament has afforded them [ftriking an Example." The Lord Chancellor, by his vlajesty's coinmand, then said:

“ My Lords and Gentlemen, " It is his Maj-sty's Royal will and pl asure that this Parliament be prorogued to Thursday the fifth day of October vext, to b: then here holden; and this Parliament is accordingly prorogued to Thursday the fifth day of October next.

HOUSE

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HOUSE OF COMMONS.

Thursday, July 20. Writs were ordered to be iflued for Members to serve in Para liament for

The Burghs of Anstruther, Pitteneven, &c. in the room of John Anstruther, Esq. who has accepted the office of Chief Jultice of the Supreme Court of Judicature at Calcutta ;

And for Old Sarum, in the room of the Earl of Mornington, who has accepted the Chiltern Hundreds.

At a quarter before four o'clock, the Uther of the Black Rod commanded the attendance of the House in the House of Peers.

The Speaker accordingly, attended by a considerable number of Members, went up to the Upper House ; and, upon his return, read his Majesty's Speech at the Table.

IND OF THE FIRST SESSION OF THE EIGHTEENTH

PARLIAMENT.

AA for enabling his Majesty to convene the Parliament in the space of four-

teen days, introduced and palled in the House of Lords, 1684. In the

House of Commons, 17.1.
Adair, Mr. Serjeant, his speech in opposition to the motion of Mr. Fox for

the repeal of the treason and fedition bills, 1423. Objections to the title
of the bill introduced by Mr. Pitt for the punishinent of ledition, mutiny,

&c. 1604.
Adams, Mr. William, opposes the motion for the disinisTal of Ministers, 1407.
Address voted by the Commons to his Majesty on his message respecting their

making provision for the marriage of the Princess Royal, 1262. To their
Majesties and the Prince and Princess of Wirtemberg on that event taking
place, 1395. By the Lords to his Majesty on his message relpecting the
mutiny in the fleet, 1989. By the Commons on the same, 1600.
American Treaty Bill, proceedings concerning, &c. 1565.
Anderson, Mr. Alderman, opposes the motion of Mr. Alderman Combe for

the dismissal of Ministers, 1402.
Artificers in the dock-yards petition, substance of, 1267.
Athol, Duke of, his animadverfion on some parts of the Duke of Bedford's

speech previous to his motion of resolutions respecting the order of council
for a restriction on the bank, 1341. On the speech of the same noble Duke

in support of his motion for the disinisal of Ministers, 1535.
Auckland, Lord, vindicates the Minister from divers charges respecting the

order of council for a restriction on the bank, 1341. His observations on
some parts of the Duke of Bedford's speech in support of his motion for the
dismissal of Ministers, 1543.

B

.

Baker, Mr. applauds the loyalty of the soldiers, 1597.
Bank, new, motion for, debates on, 1560. Negatived, 1565. Restriction

bill pafled, 1647.
Barham, Mr. opposes the motion for the abolition of the Nave trade, 1349.

The motion for a reform of Parliament, 1487.
Baltard, Mr. opposes the motion of Mr. Pitt for alleviating the loses sustained

by the subscribers to the loyalty loan, 1573.
Bedford, Duke of, his speech previous to his motion for resolutions respecting

the causes which produced the order of council for a restriction upon the
bank 1231, &c. Remarks in reply to Lord Grenville, 1344. Speech

previous to his motion for the dismissal of Ministers, 1523.
Bill for more effe&tually restraining intercourse with crews of certain of his
majesty's ships in a state of mutiny and rebellion, and for the more effectual
suppression of the same, copy of, 1613. Debates on discussing the several
clauses of, 1616 to 1625. Passed in the Houf: of Commons, 1625. With
amendments in the House of Lords, 1626. For the issuing of finall notes
passed, 1655. For allowing Roman Catholics an 1 Protestant Disfenters to
serve as officers in the Suppkinental Militia. Debates on 1685 to 1688.

Negatived, ib.
Bootle, Mr. opposes the motion for the dismissal of Ministers, 1401.
Brandling, Mr. opposes the motion of Mr. Alderman Combe, for the dis-

mifial of Ministers, 14 4.
Bread, asfize of, bill for lettling of passed, 1637.
Browne, Mr. I. H. his speech in opposition to the motion for the dismissal

of M nifters, 1399.
Budgei, statement of, 1208 to 1213. Recapitulation of articles comprised
in, ib. Conversation and questions concerning, 1231 10 12 34. Statement

of 1664, &c. India, Statement of, 1695 to 1704.
Burdert, Sir Francis, his speech in support of Mr. Grey's motion for a reform

in Parl ament, 1475.
Burdon, Mi, opposes the motion for the dismisal of Ministers, 1411.

C.
Cavalry, volunteer corps, sum of 30,000l. voted to defray the expences of

clothing and accoutrements of, 1683.
Cavendish, Lord George, his remarks on the motion of Mr. Whitbread for a

vote of censure on the conduct of the Minister, 1317.
Chelmondeley, Mr. opposes the motion for the repeal of the treason and sedi-

tion bills, 1440.
Comb, Mr. Alderman, his observations previous to his motion for the dir-

millal of Ministers, 1396.
Corn Bill, proceedings on, 1140.
County Rites, bill for a more equitable adjustment of, debates on, 1204, 1260.

Paslod, 1320.
Courtney, Mr. his remarks on the county rates bill, 1261.
Curtis, Mr. Alderman, opposes the motion of Mr. Alderman Combe for the

dismislil of Ministers, 1402.
Curwen, Mr. his remarks in support of the motion of Mr. Whitbread for a

yole of cenfiire on the conduct of the Minister, 1317. Of the motion of Mr.
Aldurman Combe for the dilmissal of Ministers, 1403.

D.
Darnley, Earl of, opposes the motion of the Duke of Bedford for the dismissal

of Ministers, 1951.
Debtors, b3l for an increase of allowance to, passed, 1381, Insolvent bill for

their reliet pilled, 1688.
Dent, Mr. oppofis the motion for the dismislil of Ministers, 1409. The
motion of Mr. Pitt for repairing the lolles fustained by the original sub-

fcribers to the loyalty loan, 1956.
Dismissal of Ministers, motion for in the House of Commons, debates on,

1399 to i}lI. Negatived, ib. In the House of Lords, 1935 to 1553.

Negatived, ib,
Dihen, Sir William, supports the motion of Mr. Wilberforce for the aboli.

tion of the Save trade, 1349.
Domingo, Illind of, motion for withdrawing the troops from, 1385.
Duntas, Mr. his observations in reply to the allegations of Mr. Fox in sup.

port of the motion of Mr. Whitbread for a vote of censure on the conduct
of the Minilier, 1313. In reply to the speech of Mr. St. John, in support
of his inotion for withdrawing the troops from the Illand of St. Domingo,
1385. In vindication of the conduct of the admiralty froin the censure of
Mr. Sheridan, 1595. After his statement of the India budget, 1705.

E.
East India Company's oath bill, moved for and negatived, 1345.
Edwards, Mr. Bryan, opposes the motion for the abolition of the flave trade,

1349. For withdrawing the troops from the island of St. Domingo, 1391.
Elford, Major, opposes the motion for the repeal of the trtaion and sedi:ion

bills, 1429.
Ellis, Mr. his observations in opposition to the motion of Mr. Wilberforce

for the abolition of the slave trade, 1346. To the motion of Mr. Alderman

Combe for the dismiffal of Ministers, 1408.
Ellison, Mr. his observations in opposition to the motion for the repeal of the

trealou and sedition bills, 1431.
Errol, Earl of, validity of his titles to the peerage declared by the Lord Chan-

cellor, and confirmed, together with his election as representative peer of
Scotland in the House of Lords, 1394.

Erfkine,

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