The Senses and the Intellect

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J. W. Parker, 1855 - 614 páginas
 

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Subject of Function
37
The voice an organ of the expression of feeling
39
Functions of the Spinal Cord and Medulla Oblongata
43
Uncertainty of the functions of these bodies
53
Nerve force derived from the common source of natural
59
Reasons for including Appetites and Instincts in the depart
65
VAGI
67
Tonicity or Tonic Contraction of muscle
72
The muscles act in groups or systems
81
Feelings proper to the muscular system
96
Slow movements
102
Basis of muscular discrimination
108
Classification according to locality or seat
122
o Feeling of Cold
132
taking of food and healthy digestion
139
Feelings of Electrical States 19 Electric and Voltaic shocks
145
Electrical state of the Atmosphere
146
SENSE OF TASTE 1 Bodies acting on the sense of Taste
147
Organ of Tastedescription of the Tongue
149
Local distribution of the sensibility of the tongue
150
Mode of action in taste
151
Sensations of Tastecomplex sensibility of the tongue
152
Order of Classification
153
Relishes ib 8 Disgusts
154
description of feeling of Sweetness ib 10 Bitter tastes
156
Saline tastes ib 12 Alkaline tastes
157
Fiery tastes ib 16 Intellectual aspect of tastes
158
Development of odours
160
Diffusion of odours
161
description of the Nose ib 5 Action of odours
163
their classification
164
Fresh odours
165
sensation of sweetness
166
Bad odours
167
Pungent odours
168
Ethereal odours
169
Appetizing odours ib 15 Flavour
170
Impressions of distinguishable
181
Qualities of Extension and Solidity
193
Action of the parts of the ear in the sensation of sound
199
io Complexity Discord and Harmony
208
Conditions of perfect vision
227
Wheatstones experiments
233
Optical and muscular feelings combined
239
Motionspectacle of moving objects
241
Appetite a species of Volition
249
CHAPTER IV
256
The locomotive rhythm
262
Also an alternate movement of corresponding limbs
265
Lastly a vermicular propagation of movement
267
Associated actions of the two eyes
268
Law of harmony of state of the muscular system
270
One sense instinctively acting for another
271
OF THE INSTINCTIVE PLAY OF EMOTION 13 Movements and effects diffused by Emotion
272
Miiller on Movements due to the passions of the mind
273
Sir Charles Bell on the movements of the face
275
Convulsive outburst of grief
287
OF THE INSTINCTIVE GERM OF VOLITION 26 Volition a compound of spontaneity and something else
289
Spontaneity alone insufficient to constitute voluntary power
291
Voluntary command of the organs not instinctive
292
States of feeling impel to some action or other
293
Coincidence of a state of feeling and a suitable action at first accidental
294
A process of acquisition connects the two together
296
Summary of the theory of volition
297
Instinct of selfpreservation only an example of volition
298
INTELLECT General characters that distinguish the Intellect
315
Acquisition of combined movements
321
Seat of revived impressions the same as that of
333
Objection to the stimulus of terror
339
Sensations of Touch
345
Three different kinds of forms
353
Impressions of Light and Colour
357
SENSATIONS OF DIFFERENT SENSES
359
Meaning or import of Extension
367
to form an abstraction to express the uniform
375
The appreciation of Distance follows the estimate
379
Localization of bodily feelings
385
ASSOCIATES WITH EMOTION
393
Sublimity and beauty of sounds
399
Reading of Emotional expression
401
6 It progresses with the acquired habits
409
Natural persistence of mental movements once begun
420
Method of mechanical training
426
The mother tongue
432
The experimental and concrete sciences
438
their mode of adhesion
443
LAW OP SIMILARITY
451
Hearing the effect of familiarity 10 Identification of objects dimly seen
457
Likeness with unlike accompaniments the principal field
462
Touches
469
The ear concerned in our retentiveness for language
475
Properties common to sensations of different senses
484
25 Objects identified from their uses mechanical invention
490
Classifications of the naturalist Linnaeus
496
Identification among the different classes of successions
501
Scientific Causation Newtons discovery of universal
507
the inductive process demands the power
514
Reasoning by Analogy
523
Persuasion
529
Some of the Fine Arts involve the intellect largely
535
Business acquisitions
541
Connexion of things with uses
549
MIXED CONTIGUITY AND SIMILARITY
555
THE SINGLING OUT OF ONE AMONG MANY TRAINS
562
CHAPTER IV
571
CONSTRUCTIVENES8 IN THE SENSATIONS
579
Combining of two emotions so as to bring out a third
586
CONSTRUCTIVENESS IN SCIENCE
592
The presence of an emotional element in intellectual
599
Terror Anger 601 25 Superstructures reared on Egotistic feeling 604 26 Constructions to satisfy the emotions of Fine Art properly
605
Discrimination of the degree of contraction in a muscle
612

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