Varronianus: A Critical and Historical Introduction to the Ethnography of Ancient Italy and to the Philological Study of the Latin Language

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J. W. Parker & Son, 1852 - 476 páginas
 

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They preserve their national integrity in Etruria
11
The Etruscansthe authors theory respecting their origin
14
The names Etbuscus and Rasena cannot be brought to an agreement with Tyrsenus
16
It is explicitly stated by ancient writers that the Etruscans came from Rtctia
17
This view of the case is after all the most reasonable
18
It is confirmed by all available evidence and especially by the contrast between the town and country languages of Etruria
19
Farther inferences derivable from a the traditionary his tory of the Luceres
21
6 Fragmentary records of the early constitution of Rome
23
c Etymology of some mythical proper names
24
General conclusion as to the mutual relations of the old Italian tribes
26
Etymology of the word nXatry6r
28
How tho Pelasgians came into Europe
30
lenic architecture
31
Supported by deductions from the contrasted mythology of the two races
36
Thracians Getse and Scythians
39
Scythians and Medes
40
Mode of discriminating the ethnical elements in this chain of nations
42
Peculiarities of the Scythian language suggested by Aristo phanes
44
Names of the Scythian rivers derived and explained
45
Names of the Scythian divinities
48
Other Scythian words explained
52
fate of the Mon golian race
55
The Pelasgians were of Sclavonian origin
58
Foreign affinities of the Umbrians c
59
Farther confirmation from etymology
61
Celtic tribes intermixed with the Sclavonians and Lithuanians in Italy and elsewhere
62
The Sarmatse probably a branch of the Lithuanian family
64
Gothic or LowGerman affinities of the ancient Etruscans shown by their ethnographic opposition to the Veneti
66
Reasons for comparing tho old Etruscan with the Old Norse
68
Old Norse explanations of Etruscan proper names
69
Contacts and contrasts of the Semitic and the Sclavonian
72
Predominant Sclavonism of the old Italian languages
74
THE UMBRIAN LANGUAGE A8 EXHIBITED IN THE EUGUBINE TABLES 1 The Eugubine Tables
78
guished
79
The Sibilants
80
Some remarks on the other letters
82
Umbrian grammatical forms
83
Tab I a 1
86
OCT FAG1
89
Umbrian words which approximate to their Latin synonyms
99
The Bantine Table
116
The Cippus Abellanus
127
CHAPTER V
139
Alphabetical list of Etruscan words interpreted
151
Etruscan Inscriptionsdifficulties attending their interpre
165
Inscriptions containing the words Suthi and Trce
174
The great Perugian Inscription critically examinedits Runic
180
Harmony between linguistic research and ethnographic tra
189
CHAPTER VI
193
Arvalian Litany
194
Chants preserved by Cato
196
Fragments of Sal inn hymns
197
Old regal laws
200
Remains of the XII Tables
203
Table LL
205
Table III
207
Table rv
208
Table V
209
Table VI
210
The Silian and Papirian laws and the Edict of the curule Ed ilcs
230
The SenattuConsultum de Bacchanalibus
232
The old Roman law on the Bantine Table
234
ANALYSIS OF THE LATIN ALPHABET 1 Organic classification of the original Latin Alphabet
238
The labials
239
The gutturals
245
The dentals
254
The rowels
260
The Greek letters used by the Romans
267
The numeral signs
272
THE LATIN CASESYSTEM an MM
274
General scheme of the caseendings
275
Differences of crudeform
276
Hypothetical forms of the nominative and accusative plural
278
Existing formsthe genitive
280
The dative and locative
282
The accusative singular
283
The ablative
284
The vocative
286
Adverbs considered as cases of nouns
287
Adverbial expression for the day of the month
292
CHAPTER IX
293
General rules for the classification of Latin nouns t
294
First or o Declension
296
A First class or purely consonantal nouns
297
B Second class or semiconsonantal nouns
301
CHAPTER X
307
Indicative Pronouns
310
Distinctive Pronouns
315
Relative interrogative and indefinite Pronouns
318
Numerals and Degrees of Comparison
327
Prepositions
329
Negative particles
337
THE THEORY OF THE LATIN VERB 8BCT PAOB 1 The Latin verb generally defective
341
Doctrine of the Latin tenses
343
The substantive verbs
345
Paucity of organic formations in the regular Latin verb
350
General scheme of tenses in the Latin verb
351
Verbs which may be regarded as parathetic compounds
352
Tenses of the vowelverbs which are combinations of the same kind
353
Organic derivation of the tenses in the consonant verb
355
The modal distinctionstheir syntax
356
Forms of tho infinitive and participlehow connected in derivation and meaning
359
The gerundium and gerundivum shown to be active and present
361
The participle in tilrus
365
The past tense of the infinitive active
369
THE LATIN CONJUGATIONS 1 The conjugations are regulated by the same principles as the declensions
372
The first or a conjugation
373
The second or e conjugation
377
The third or i conjugation
382
The fourth or consonant conjugation A Mute verbs
384
B Liquid verbs
388
Semiconsonantal verbs
390
Irregular verbs A Additions to the present tense
391
B Abbreviated forms
397
Defective verbs
399
DERIVATION AND COMPOSITION 1 A Derivation General principles
400
Derivation is merely extended or ulterior inflexion
401

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