The Science of English Verse

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Charles Scribner's Sons, 1880 - 295 páginas

The Science of English Verse by Sydney Lanier, first published in 1880, is a rare manuscript, the original residing in one of the great libraries of the world. This book is a reproduction of that original, which has been scanned and cleaned by state-of-the-art publishing tools for better readability and enhanced appreciation.

Restoration Editors' mission is to bring long out of print manuscripts back to life. Some smudges, annotations or unclear text may still exist, due to permanent damage to the original work. We believe the literary significance of the text justifies offering this reproduction, allowing a new generation to appreciate it.

 

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Página 295 - The splendor falls on castle walls And snowy summits old in story: The long light shakes across the lakes, And the wild cataract leaps in glory, Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying, Blow, bugle; answer, echoes, dying, dying, dying.
Página 90 - He is dead and gone, lady, He is dead and gone, At his head a grass-green turf, At his heels a stone.
Página 98 - Break, break, break, On thy cold gray stones, O Sea! And I would that my tongue could utter The thoughts that arise in me. O well for the fisherman's boy, That he shouts with his sister at play! O well for the sailor lad, That he sings in his boat on the bay! And the stately ships go on To their haven under the hill; But O for the touch of a...
Página 199 - With fairest flowers, Whilst summer lasts, and I live here, Fidele, I'll sweeten thy sad grave : thou shalt not lack The flower that's like thy face, pale primrose ; nor The azured hare-bell, like thy veins ; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, Out-sweeten'd not thy breath...
Página 189 - Merciful Heaven ! Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt Splitt'st the unwedgeable and gnarled oak Than the soft myrtle...
Página 238 - Noli me tangere ; for Caesar's I am, And wild for to hold, though I seem tame.
Página 88 - ... same, And keep invention in a noted weed, That every word doth almost tell my name, Showing their birth and where they did proceed? O, know, sweet love, I always write of you, And you and love are still my argument; So all my best is dressing old words new, Spending again what is already spent; For as the sun is daily new and old, So is my love still telling what is told.
Página 204 - Cromwell, where instead of the metre of Shakspeare, whose secret is that the thought constructs the tune, so that reading for the sense will best bring out the rhythm, — here the lines are constructed on a given tune, and the verse has even a trace of pulpit eloquence.
Página 239 - Love that doth reign and live within my thought, And built his seat within my captive breast, Clad in the arms wherein with me he fought Oft in my face he doth his banner rest.
Página 314 - ELEMENTS OF PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. By GEORGE T. LADD, DD, Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy in Yale University. With numerous illustrations. 8vo, $4.50.

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